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Submission + - Resolve all the facebook hiccups with the association of tech support (

judewatson writes: With the globalization in the world, the mean of the living standard are grooming at the fast pace. Obviously, internet technology imparts the best option to imitate communication to the large number of the people. So, various websites are uploaded on the web to make the international value. Amongst the group of those websites, nobody can ignore the importance of the social media channel. Its voice is echoed among the different age people.

Submission + - Check Point Finds Dangerous Vulnerabilities In LG Mobile Devices (

An anonymous reader writes: Check Point found two vulnerabilities which can be used to elevate privileges on LG mobile devices to attack them remotely. These vulnerabilities are unique to LG devices, which account for over 20% of the Android OEM market in the US. The first vulnerability allows a malicious app installed on an LG device to abuse the lack of bind permissions in an LG service and to elevate its privileges, allowing additional control of the device. The second vulnerability allows a remote attacker to delete or modify SMS messages received on a device. This could be used as part of a phishing scheme to steal a user’s credentials or to install a malicious app.

Submission + - The sea levels are now reducing in Washington and New York (

An anonymous reader writes: After December 2009, the last month of data considered by Sallenger & co. in their June 2012 paper, corrected online June 2013 with the publishing in the supplementary of the actual numbers, a positive phase of the oscillations has been replaced by a negative phase.

The sea levels have declined in both Washington DC and The Battery NY, -3.3 mm/year in Washington DC and -10.7 mm/year in The Battery NY.

Submission + - Court bans smart meter blueprints from public, requester sued amid terror fears (

schwit1 writes: Phil Mocek, the sysadmin-activist at the center of a bizarre legal battle over a smart meter network in Seattle, Washington, says he never expected a simple records request to turn into a lawsuit.

"We all assume these meters simply monitor the amount of energy usage in the home," Mocek explained. "But they monitor it in real time in ways that other meters did not." When he asked Seattle City Light, a public power utility, to provide details on the designs and rollout of its smart power meter grid, he was simply hoping to find out what security safeguards the city and hardware providers Landis+Gyr and Sensus USA planned to use.

This, says Mocek, is where things started to get real odd.

After an email exchange with Seattle City Light officials, he obtained a mix of unredacted and redacted documents by the city, which he uploaded to the web – only to be told that the smart meter suppliers objected to the release of the information on the grounds that the unredacted documents would disclose their trade secrets and open the public to terrorist attacks on their infrastructure. Landis+Gyr and Sensus promptly sued the city, Mocek and Muckrock, and filed for an injunction: ultimately, the suppliers wanted the documents taken down, and the unredacted copies banned from public view.

On Thursday, a temporary restraining order was granted by the King County Superior Court in Washington – and Muckrock founder Michael Morisy confirmed the unredacted documents have been taken down pending the outcome of the case.

Submission + - Walking robot simulation using two motors (

mikegilmore2015 writes: If you have ever tried to make a walking robot, you know that it is not easy. The trick is usually about finding a way to convert simple rotary motion into a walking action. Here is a novel approach that takes the output from two motors to create a four-legged walker. Very cool!

See more great mechanical simulations on engineer Nguyen Duc Thang's YouTube channel.

Submission + - Asus Unveils $599 Home Robot 'Zenbo' (

An anonymous reader writes: In addition to the razor thin ZenBook 3, Asus unveiled a cute talking robot for the home at this week's Computex trade show in Taipei. The robot, called Zenbo, is priced at $599 and is pitched as a personal assistant that can help look after elderly relatives or read stories to the kids. It's about two feet tall and rolls around on wheels, with a display that can show animated faces or be used for making video calls and streaming movies. When asked, "Hey Zenbo, is it true you can take pictures?" by Asus Chairman Jonney Shih, the robot replied with, "Yes, I can take photographs." Zenbo took a photo of him on stage with the audience in the background when Shih told it to. The robot doesn't have an official release date yet, but developers can sign up for a software kit to build applications for it.

Innocent Until Predicted Guilty 430

theodp writes "Gizmodo has an angry piece on IBM helping Florida to predict how delinquent your child's going to be. The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice has decided to start using IBM predictive analytics software to help them determine which of the 85,000 kids who enter their system each year poses the biggest future threat. From IBM's sales pitch: 'Predictive analytics gives government organizations worldwide a highly-sophisticated and intelligent source to create safer communities by identifying, predicting, responding to and preventing criminal activities. It gives the criminal justice system the ability to draw upon the wealth of data available to detect patterns, make reliable projections and then take the appropriate action in real time to combat crime and protect citizens.'"
Role Playing (Games)

Submission + - Wesnoth 1.2 released

An anonymous reader writes: "More than one year has gone by since we released Wesnoth 1.0. As a Christmas present for you, and to thank you for more than 1,000,000 downloads via, we now proudly present Wesnoth 1.2."

Submission + - Telefactoring - are Waldoes getting closer?

ferd_farkle writes: Science Daily has an article about engineering advances to help steady the hands of surgeons working in really cramped spaces like eyes and throats.

From the article:
"The tools include a snakelike robot that could enable surgeons, operating in the narrow throat region, to make incisions and tie sutures with greater dexterity and precision. Another robot, the steady-hand, may curb a surgeon's natural tremor and allow the doctor to inject drugs into tiny blood vessels in the eye, dissolving clots that can damage vision."

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