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Slashback

Slashback: Hatred, Glass, Identification 207

Slashback brings you another source for the Unix Haters' Handbook, along with more news on the Caldera v. IBM lawsuit and other updates on topics from XPde to creating a stained-glass computer. Read on below for the details.

Why Yes, you can sell the Free books. ProteusQ writes "Project Gutenberg has released a 'Best Of' CD, April 2003 Edition. The CD compilation is copyrighted and licensed under a Creative Commons license that allows unlimited non-commercial duplication and distribution. You can even sell it, provided that you share 20% of the gross profits with Project Gutenberg. It contains almost 500 books, and the 'Best Of' project itself based on the Open Source model. All of the work was performed by volunteers (mostly by me, in this case), with the goal of building a volunteer base to create about three editions per year."

Welcome to the American legal system, mind your footing. An anonymous reader submits: "In an e-mail discussion that took place 24 and 25 April, SCO-Caldera Senior Vice President Chris Sontag told MozillaQuest Magazine that there is SCO-owned code in Red Hat and SuSE Linux distributions. He also told MozillaQuest Magazine that the tainted code is not in the Linux kernel that Linus [Torvalds] and others have helped develop. We're talking about what's on the periphery of the Linux kernel."

On this topic, Random BedHead Ed writes "IBM has released its denial of SCO Group's charges that it borrowed proprietary UNIX code in its development of the GNU/Linux system. Story at News.com.com.com.etc. The battle continues.

Also, check out PCLinuxOnline.com for a good summary of the events thus far. They also have a Boycott SCO page if you're interested."

The height of practicality. Jerami Campbell writes "I just saw your article in Slashdot 'Building a stained glass computer case?' I have made several stained glass computer cases, I thought you might be interested in checking them out. You can see all of my cases at lucentrigs.com. I will have a new one finished in a couple of days. It is black glass with a red lava lamp mounted in the front."

Gun buffs have well-adjusted sights. In regards to the MP3-player-in-a-rifle-magazine posted the other day, Mat S. writes "I would be reaaaaally surprised if this fit a standard AK-47, as it is an SVD (Russian infantry rifle, as opposed to the AK, which is in fact a carbine, although called an assault rifle) mag. It accommodates much more powerful ammo, and the cartridges are about 50% longer than the AK's. Thank you for your attention. I still WANT this player. Might be a bit on the heavy side, though. this case is stamped steel, about 3 mm thick :)"

Fair and balanced, naturally. An anonymous reader writes "For those of you who were unable to obtain the Microsoft propaganda about Unix, it's up at MIT."

Note for the humorless: the UHH is not "Microsoft propaganda."

The best Congress money can buy. If you thought Hilary Rosen writing Iraq's copyright law was an isolated incident, don't worry, she's not alone. theodp writes "The RIAA paid $18,000 for the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee to travel to Taiwan and Thailand to make it clear to government officials that the pressure to enforce U.S. laws against pirating of music and movies 'is a unified message coming from all levels of the U.S. government.' Watchdog groups say the trip may have violated House ethics rules, and one is calling for a House Ethics Committee investigation. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., said he could have used committee funds to pay for the trip but, 'I thought I would save the taxpayers some money on this.'"

Thanks a bundle.

A considerate way to fool your friends and family. We've mentioned the blink-twice Trompe L'Oeil Windows-looking desktop XPde a few times before; now xexen writes "On April 26th 2003, I received an email. The XPde Team released XPde 0.3.5, a major upgrade to the XPde desktop environment and window manager. Check out the announcement, view the screenshots, or read the detailed ChangeLog."

Build up your frequent flyer miles. A few weeks ago we mentioned that the proceedings of the most recent linux.conf.au (a Linux gathering Down Under) were available as an ISO; hemos, who was on hand at the conference, passes on word that the CDs have been sent out, and points to some more info on the next LCA.

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Slashback: Hatred, Glass, Identification

Comments Filter:
  • MP3 Rifles? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Santos L. Halper ( 591801 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:02PM (#5858303)
    All my rifles play ogg.
    • All of my rifles play an open-source audio compression format that developed myself. They also can be hooked up to a computer with a coax cable so that source can be read at all times.:)
  • Yes (Score:2, Funny)

    by The Bungi ( 221687 )
    Fair and balanced, naturally.

    Like coverage of Linux. Naturally.

  • by SHEENmaster ( 581283 ) <travis AT utk DOT edu> on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:06PM (#5858332) Homepage Journal
    So I didn't have to "wget -r" their entire FTP server from the local college's multiple T3 lines? Sorry guys.

    (Just a joke, no need for you to do the same to my server.)
    • Personally, I made a copy of PG a while back. I made it from my (at the time) 256kbps connection. I would rather have downloaded the files compressed, but since they don't provide that option, the PG guys must not care about bandwidth.

      I took all the files and compressed them (bzip2 -9) so they would all fit on a CD, along with programs that could uncompress them on a few platforms. I contacted PG, basically asking if they would like me to make my ISO available, so people wanting to do the same wouldn't
  • lava lamps (Score:3, Interesting)

    by shird ( 566377 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:06PM (#5858336) Homepage Journal
    As cool as it might look, I cant imagine having a lava lamp on the front of your case is too practical - those things get verrry hot. If your anything like me, youd prefer to have it as bare bones as possible, concentrating more on temperature, in order to get the fan speeds down ( = less noise).
    • Re:lava lamps (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Ulalume ( 669591 )
      The way I designed the case the lava lamp has two fans mounted above it, venting hot air out. and once it is heated to the "flowing" temp. I can turn off two of the lights and it flows without generating any heat to the case. Nothing actually touches the glass the lava is in. it is completely surrounded by air. so their isn't much for the heat to transfer too, and air flow is excelent.
    • Re:lava lamps (Score:2, Insightful)

      by billtom ( 126004 )
      Huh? This guy is building *stained glass* computer cases and you're pointing out that he's not being very practical by including a lava lamp?

  • um (Score:4, Insightful)

    by GigsVT ( 208848 ) * on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:09PM (#5858357) Journal
    "The RIAA paid $18,000 for the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee to travel to Taiwan and Thailand

    Why is this buried in a Slashback? Come on! This is huge news.
    • Re:um (Score:5, Interesting)

      by philovivero ( 321158 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:58PM (#5858654) Homepage Journal
      Yeah, this is huge news. A U.S. congressman spent $18,000 to go to Taiwan and Thailand? I know for a fact that at the most expensive hotels and with the most expensive food, you can only spend about $8,000 on a trip to those countries. So the other $10,000 went to prostitutes, drugs, and... what? Into his pocket?
    • Re:um (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Otter ( 3800 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @08:49PM (#5858961) Journal
      Why is this buried in a Slashback? Come on! This is huge news.

      No it's not. "Fact-finding"junkets like this are perfectly routine. You may find that reassuring or you may find it cause for even more concern. (In any case, the story of a British MP taking hundreds of thousands of pounds from an Iraqi intelligence agency has gone almost unnoticed in the US.)

      Meanwhile, I had a story rejected today that seems like it would be of interest: Boycott Hollywood [boycott-hollywood.us] had their domain revoked after legal threats from the William Morris Agency. They posted contact information for anti-war celebrities and their agents, incurring the wrath of a powerful firm.

      Keep that in mind the next time you hear Susan Sarandon and Martin Sheen whining about being silenced.

      • Re:um (Score:4, Interesting)

        by abe ferlman ( 205607 ) <(bgtrio) (at) (yahoo.com)> on Thursday May 01, 2003 @09:25PM (#5859179) Homepage Journal
        It's not huge news because the junket was paid for - It's huge news because Sensenbrenner, the Chairman of the *House Judiciary Committee*, was actually *criticized* for it - and Rupert Murdoch's news empire took notice. It even ran on the front page of foxnews.com for a while.

        Unfortunately, THAT is not at all routine, and should be front page news here.

      • Re:um (Score:2, Interesting)

        by u38cg ( 607297 )
        I think the reason the story about George Galloway has gone unnoticed is that no-one believes a word of it.

        The story, for those that missed it, is that Galloway was a big anti-war, anti-sanctions guy. He went out to Iraq several times and appeared more than once in public cosily chatting to Saddam-may-he-rest-in-peace. Then, last week, the Daily Telegraph (very right-wing, whereas George Galloway is kinda not), produced documents apparently showing Galloway had taken piles of money for it.

        It's intere

  • by baximus ( 552800 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:12PM (#5858377)
    PlanetMirror [planetmirror.com] has the UHH here [planetmirror.com].

    Enjoy (yeah, second time i've posted this - the last time got deleted - thanks guys)
    • by Doom Ihl' Varia ( 315338 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @08:31PM (#5858833)
      MIT? Get Slashdotted? Pardon me while I die of laughter.
      These guys have more bandwith than Jesus. Of course Jesus never owned a computer but if he did you could betcha he would have some pretty heavy fiber.
      • Well, I'm not sure how much bandwidth they have, but as an aside, I do remember they have an insane amount of IP space.

        In fact when I was there in the early 90's, the student paper kept making jokes about how even the lightsockets in the hallways had their own IP addresses. the entire 18.x.x.x space is (or at least *was* at the time) MIT, giving them over 16 million IP addresses to assign to students.

        • That's pretty cool!
          whois 18.0.0.0

          OrgName: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
          OrgID: MIT-2
          Address: Laboratory for Computer Science
          Address: 545 Main Street
          City: Cambridge
          StateProv: MA
          PostalCode: 02139
          Country: US

          NetRange: 18.0.0.0 - 18.255.255.255
          CIDR: 18.0.0.0/8
          NetName: MIT
          NetHandle: NET-18-0-0-0-1
          Parent:
          NetType: Direct Assignment
          NameServer: STRAWB.MIT.EDU
          NameServer: W20NS.MIT.EDU
          NameServer: BITSY.MIT.EDU
          Comment:
          RegDate:
          Updated: 1998-09-26

          TechHandle: JIS-ARIN
          T
          • You're about 10 years too late for that. Guess who has 17.*.*.* [iana.org]

            017/8 Jul 92 Apple Computer Inc.
            018/8 Jan 94 MIT

            Plenty of other interesting class A owners there too:

            034/8 Mar 93 Halliburton Company
            044/8 Jul 92 Amateur Radio Digital Communications
            051/8 Aug 94 Deparment of Social Security of UK
          • When do I get my own class A subnet?

            When you're one of the first people on the web. :) "Back in the day," no one imagined the Internet would be what it is today, and they gave out huge chunks of IP space without thinking twice.

            BTW, I wrote a script to do whois lookups on all the Class A's (although I don't know where the output went... I though I saved it somewhere). There have to be at least 25 Class A's that the US Government owns.
    • Only folks like Microsoft complain about a Slashdotting. It has something to do with eating thier own dog food, hating Unix and hating Slashdot. Oh wow, look, they took down that silly remark about Slashdoting [microsoft.com]. Slashbacking must be something they can deal with.
      • Only folks like Microsoft complain about a Slashdotting. It has something to do with eating thier own dog food, hating Unix and hating Slashdot.

        Wow...with the way you manage to make everything you write an anti-Microsoft screed, I bet you're a ton of fun [penny-arcade.com] to be around.

        Get a life.

  • Microsoft propaganda (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:13PM (#5858389)
    Note for the humorless: the UHH is not "Microsoft propaganda."

    I note that since the original story was posted, a disclaimer has been put up at the site (no doubt in response to the humorless):

    Due to being announced on Slashdot.org, the book has gotten a lot of fresh attention. I've added this page so that those downloading the book can be aware of some history before starting their read.

    • This book is ten years old . I started work on it in 1992 (maybe even 1991) while I was a professor at Stanford. My co-editors took over after I started work at Microsoft. (So no, it's not a Microsoft conspiracy.) A lot has happened in the intervening decade.
    • This book's target audience was people who themselves have noticed certain weaknesses in Unix at that time and could relate to our stories. Our goal was humor. Many readers have told us we succeeded in this. Even Eric Raymond liked it (his name is in the acknowledgements).
    • The book is not meant to be balanced, it is a screed, pure and simple. Is it over the top? Yes.
    • We wrote the contract with our publisher to have the copyright revert to us once the book went out of print. So yes, we have the right to publish it online. Feel free to mirror it where ever you want, print it out, and bind it.
    • Do I have any regrets? Yes, that the funniest item in the book probably isn't anything we wrote, but is Dennis Ritchie's anti-forword. (We had asked Dennis to write a forword, thinking that since he was doing Plan 9 at that time, it would give him an opportunity to talk about how he had moved on from Unix and fixed its flaws in his next OS. (We were young and had a lot chutzpah then.) He read the Preface, and then sent back his essay. We thought it was great and tremendously funny, so we added it in (with permission). To this day, I don't know if he expected us to publish it.)
    • If you enjoyed reading this book and felt it was worth the price of a least a movie and popcorn, send a $10 check to your favorite charity.
    • A care-ware license? Good choice
    • Do I have any regrets? Yes, that the funniest item in the book probably isn't anything we wrote, but is Dennis Ritchie's anti-forword. (We had asked Dennis to write a forword, thinking that since he was doing Plan 9 at that time, it would give him an opportunity to talk about how he had moved on from Unix and fixed its flaws in his next OS.

      Well first off, Plan 9 did not attempt to address a single one of the problems identified in the haters handbook. So it should not be a surprise that Ritchie did not re

    • Since the first article (well both of them) I have had a chance to download and read the book. I was expecting to be outraged at the authors' lack of knowledge about my favourite operating system but in fact found myself squirming with embarrassment because many of their criticisms seemed to be perfectly valid.

      The lack of a proper undelete support and/or versioning, the utter abortion that is/was ufs and its derivatives, the total lack of consistency in commands and their switches, the other abortion that

  • by Ozan ( 176854 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:15PM (#5858407) Homepage
    I don't exactly know what the u.s. equivalent is, but in Germany there is something called negative Feststellungsklage which means that Suse could apply for a court order declaring that SCOs claims are false and prohibits them to repeat their allegations.

    If SCO seeks to achieve a precedent by sueing Suse this might be the appropriate backfire.

    Just a thought.
    • by Cyberdyne ( 104305 ) * on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:38PM (#5858541) Journal
      I don't exactly know what the u.s. equivalent is, but in Germany there is something called negative Feststellungsklage which means that Suse could apply for a court order declaring that SCOs claims are false and prohibits them to repeat their allegations. If SCO seeks to achieve a precedent by sueing Suse this might be the appropriate backfire.

      There's a similar mechanism in the US (nothing to do with "affirmative action", at least in the US sense): you can petition the court for a "Declaratory Judgement". Effectively, winning such a judgement in your favor would mean SCO had already lost the first court case - they'd have to start off by appealing an existing ruling in your favor, instead of starting a new case against you. Definition here [gsm.com].

  • by mrt300 ( 580362 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:17PM (#5858415) Homepage
    I grabbed the UHH from the MIT guy and threw it on a Purdue server. Download away.

    http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~anthontj/random/ugh.pdf [purdue.edu]
  • by yeoua ( 86835 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:18PM (#5858419)
    So which of the 4 poor saps sued by the RIAA (and then settled) paid for the congressman's trip?
    • So which of the 4 poor saps sued by the RIAA (and then settled) paid for the congressman's trip?

      $18,000 only bought the congressman and does not cover promotion of the tour. There's money for the officials he will meet, money for the "advisors" to follow them all, a couple of fancy suits, stage hands and all that. When it's all said and done, the congressman, the advisors, Tiwan, Korea, Eastasia, Eurasia and Airstrip One will all owe the RIAA for this trip. You can never have too much promotion if you

  • by MoThugz ( 560556 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:20PM (#5858427) Homepage
    including this personal favourite of mine:

    I'm a avid reader of Slashdot, I'm a Linux guru, I'm a BOFH, I'm a geek, Why the hell would I want this f#@#ng software?

    Sorry, but I think this is not the project for you. (well, at least geeks like any kind of tech, so if you want to look at the source code.. ;-)

    • by BigBlockMopar ( 191202 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @10:47PM (#5859552) Homepage

      I'm a avid reader of Slashdot, I'm a Linux guru, I'm a BOFH, I'm a geek, Why the hell would I want this f#@#ng software?

      Heh... Yeah, I liked that, too.

      Actually, I think XPde goes a long way toward getting Linux ready for mass adoption on the desktops of the corporate world.

      Microsoft has spent millions of dollars on focus groups to have ordinary Joes and Janes sit down and play with Windows, telling them what's good and bad, from a user's perspective.

      The open source desktop metaphors don't have that resource - but Windows XP - ugly and inefficient as it may be to most Slashdot readers - does represent a lot of UI design experience.

      XPde goes the right way to adopting and trying to learn from the expertise of Microsoft and Apple.

      Having a Linux distro ship KDE with fluorescent pink menus and background wallpaper that looks like it was designed by a 14-year-old Run Lola Run fan from East Berlin does very little to encourage IT buyers that they can take the risk and leave Microsoft's comfortable if expensive and unreliable embrace.

      XPde also works to try to migrate casual users who don't have very specific or great requirements. There's one in every office: the 66-year-old executive to whom Outlook *is* e-mail, and who gets confused when you present another program with exactly the same features and operations but different icons. Just as there's no way to explain to this user that the Send button still sends e-mail and have him confidently understand it, there's also no reason for that person to run Windows with its vulnerabilities to mailbox Klez and Nimbda attacks.

      I can think of a few desktops which I'm going to migrate from XP to XPde.

      And I won't tell them they're running Linux until they've been using it for a couple of weeks.

  • by Omega Hacker ( 6676 ) <omega@omeERDOSgacs.net minus math_god> on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:22PM (#5858443)
    Wow, that'll affect all of SCO's 3 customers...?
  • IP Patents (Score:1, Troll)

    by minion ( 162631 )
    I just filled a patent for printf("Hello World\n"):!

    Soon every elementary C Book will be violating my IP, and thus be required to pay me royalites.

    PS: Thanks SCO for giving me such a great idea on how to make money fast, easy, and sleasy
    • Ummm.... I'm not a C genius, but wouldn't

      printf("Hello, World\n");

      be more of a problem for them? The comma is optional, but I though those things terminated with ; and not :. :-)
  • from the FAQ of XPde (Score:4, Interesting)

    by vivek7006 ( 585218 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:30PM (#5858497) Homepage
    Can this project be sued by Microsoft?

    We don't know, we are not lawyers. But in any case, we are ready for that. We don't use any of Microsoft's registered trademarks, graphics, logos, or anything. This means someone could create a complete theme that mimics the Windows XP environment - where the dialogs are the same, the controls are positioned in the same places and with the same text.

    Maybe that would be illegal, but *we* don't include *copyrighted* material. In the case Microsoft have ownership over (for example) a-dialog-that-shows-running-processes (i.e. TaskManager) and our dialog has the controls in the same positions as the Windows one, we are right now creating the translation system. This translation system will also allow "anyone" to position the controls of any dialog in any place. We can create a version with completely different dialogs (the same controls in different places) and *someone* could create a theme which modifies these controls to the Windows XP places.

    But this is not our problem. Could Microsoft have copyrighted an environment like the taskbar concept? Could Microsoft have copyrighted the start menu concept? Could Microsoft have copyrighted the tray icon concept? Could Microsoft have copyrighted the desktop concept? In that case every desktop has a problem ;-)

    The solution here is that we are not going to ship a complete Windows XP interface clone out-of-the-box, but it will be so easy to configure that *someone* could make it look *exactly* like the Windows XP interface. We won't provide this configuration.
  • IBM's court filing would seem to be public information. Has anyone managed to locate a copy of it on the web somewhere?

  • oh (Score:4, Funny)

    by labratuk ( 204918 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:35PM (#5858527)
    At first I read that line

    ...RIAA paid $18,000 for the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee to travel to Taiwan and Thailand...

    as

    ...RIAA paid $18,000 for the chairman of the House Ludicracy Committee to travel to Taiwan and Thailand...

    Telling thing is, it made perfect sense to me the first time I scanned it.

    • At first I read that line as:
      Telling thing is, it made perfect sense to me the first time I scammed it.

      Telling thing is, it made perfect sense.

      Mod me up to +5 now.
  • can someone tell me what these terms mean? thanks.
    • by bobbozzo ( 622815 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:52PM (#5858627)
      A carbine is a short rifle (barrel length under 20").

      "assault rifle" is a general term some anti-gun activists and politicians and media have created.
      In the People's Republic of California, it is (defined by law as) a semiautomatic centerfire rifle with any of the following characterics:
      a pistol grip
      a flash suppressor
      magazines holding more than 10 rounds
      folding or collapsible butt stock ...
      See here [state.ca.us] or here [state.ca.us] for more exact PRC legal info.
      • by Zirnike ( 640152 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:58PM (#5858653) Journal
        Just to be clear, until about 1990 or so, any dictionary and encyclopedia (as people have been missing the obvious lately, I feel the need to say 'that I was able to get my hands on to look at') defined assault rifle with the additional charactaristic 'Must be capable of burst fire and fully automatic fire'.
      • by JimmytheGeek ( 180805 ) <jamesaffeld&yahoo,com> on Thursday May 01, 2003 @08:04PM (#5858685) Journal
        the term was in use circa WWII to denote automatic weapons firing cartridges more powerful than pistol ammunition (used in submachine guns), but less powerful than a typical rifle bullet. The rationale is that most infantry combat took place at shorter range than what made a regular rifle necessary, and it's difficult to fire an automatic rifle using the more powerful cartridges.

        Germany had a couple in WWII, the Russians had one too, I think. The U.S. went with the M14 (looks a lot like the M1, but has a detachable magazine and automatic fire) for a while, which was an automatic rifle by this definition. Then the M16.

      • http://club.guns.ru/manual/svd/ [club.guns.ru] some information about the svd dragunov.

        most notably why it isn't an 'assault rifle' like ak is the lack of full automatic fire(though, some versions with it were tested).

        it's a _sniper_ rifle to be exact, russians first to be designed from scratch for sniping(and quite good at that, supposedly 'good enough' accuracy up to 1100-1300m), and can't see why it wouldnt have been cloned quite widely like ak47.
      • Basically, the guns that have been singled out for special restrictions have been:
        • "Saturday Night Specials" (cheap handguns)
        • "Military-style handguns" (expensive handguns)
        • "Assault rifles" (cheap rifles)
        And then last summer, they started in on "sniper rifles", or expensive rifles. If I didn't know better, I'd think they were trying to eliminate guns entirely!
        • No! They would never do that, it would violate the 2nd Amendment. But who can be against common sense regulations to protect the children from another Columbine Massacre?

          After all, we have an X-Stop here in my library's network stack to block anything that somebody thinks might be harmful to a minor from reaching any patron, regardless of their age. And yup, it was done to 'protect the children' and therefore Congress assures us it doesn't violate the 1st Amendment. Would our leaders lie to us? What k
  • $18000 eh ? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Rosco P. Coltrane ( 209368 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:37PM (#5858533)
    The RIAA paid $18,000 for the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee to travel to Taiwan and Thailand

    Now you know what they needed those students' money [com.com] for.

  • by Phantasmo ( 586700 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:40PM (#5858554)
    I know that ibiblio exists to serve up stuff like this, but is there someone out there with a compressed copy of April's CD that could post a .torrent?
    Slashdotters have been good lately about using BitTorrent to shoulder some of the bandwidth load (for example, when the Matrix Reloaded trailer was released.)
  • by philovivero ( 321158 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:51PM (#5858621) Homepage Journal
    I know Unix like I know the back of my hand. I love Unix like I love the palm of my hand.
  • XPDE (Score:2, Informative)

    by zzxc ( 635106 )
    I noticed that the XPDE screenshots use mozilla/netscape with the classic skin. There is an Internet Explorer skin [mozdev.org] at mozdev.org they could be using. (if they want to copy windows explorer, this would be a must)
  • by r00zky ( 622648 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @07:57PM (#5858649)
    Best PG book ever:
    Square Root of 4 To A Million Places, The [ibiblio.org]
    A must read...
  • by hayden ( 9724 ) on Thursday May 01, 2003 @08:14PM (#5858747)
    The book was published before Windows NT was released. They then went quiet after Windows NT was released.

    Given a choice between Unix and Windows ...

  • That rusted case is so cool! Redefines 'old and busted'.
  • Anybody know anything about SUSE and SCOs' relationship now? The last I heard they "were re-evaluating their position" or something like that. I am very interested in what Redhat and SUSE has to say...
  • This is not about 10 lines of code, it's about 20 years of extremely valuable intellectual property we're trying to protect...Am I supposed to lie down and not say anything about it?" McBride asked. "There's a certain point here where you stand up for what's right and let the chips fall where they will."

    Geesh.

  • I've been impressed with the Mozilla quest SCO series. Obviously, it's not hard to tell which way the author is biased, but the interviews were good and the answers were recorded verbatim.

    Fascinating stuff.

  • I found the code that matches up exactly, the top five matches are ( drum roll )

    5) for ( int x=0;x<10;x++)
    4) while ( x<10 ) {
    3) #include stdio.h
    2) #include math.h
    1) int main( String args[] )

    Number 1) shows up in every .cpp file! Linux developers will pay for this blatant violation of SCO's IP rights!

  • by ader ( 1402 ) on Friday May 02, 2003 @04:26AM (#5860582) Homepage


    Boycotting Amazon or music companies is hard work and a great personal loss, but boycotting SCO? Sure, can do!! Done it my whole life and honestly, it hasn't degraded my quality of living at all!

    ...Uh wait, I use Red Hat though. Darn.


    Ade_
    /
  • by varjag ( 415848 )
    I would be reaaaaally surprised if this fit a standard AK-47, as it is an SVD (Russian infantry rifle, as opposed to the AK, which is in fact a carbine, although called an assault rifle) mag.

    SVD is an acronym from "Snaiperskaya Vintovka Dragunova" (Dragunov sniper rifle). It is clearly not a carabine.

    Also, the term 'assault rifle' is absent from the official Russian military lexicon. I have no idea who would call SVD an assault rifle.

    You are correct though that it was not an AK mag depicted.
  • Caldera is not SCO, SCO is not Caldera. I've worked for both (now I work for neither). SCO is a different company with a different direction, different management, different employees, different products, different everything.

    Saying SCO is Caldera is like saying Red Hat is the ACC Bookstore, or whatever it was called before the name was changed to Red Hat, Inc.
  • The height of practicality. Jerami Campbell writes "I just saw your article in Slashdot 'Building a stained glass computer case?' I have made several stained glass computer cases, I thought you might be interested in checking them out. You can see all of my cases at lucentrigs.com. I will have a new one finished in a couple of days. It is black glass with a red lava lamp mounted in the front."

    Anyone else disappointed that the Lava Lamp case [lucentrigs.com] uses 40-Watt lamps? I was kinda hoping there was a overclocked

  • "Unix survives only because everyone else has done so badly." - Donald A. Norman

    As true today as when it was written...

To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk. -- Thomas Edison

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