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Submission + - Celebrity nude pictures leaked due to apparent iCloud hack ( 1

swinferno writes: Hundreds of nude, semi-nude, and revealing pictures of female celebrities were leaked overnight after being stolen from their private collections. Hunger Games actress Jennifer Lawrence, Kirsten Dunst, and pop star Ariana Grande were among the celebrities apparently shown in the pictures, which were posted on infamous web forum 4chan.

It's unclear how the images were obtained, but anonymous 4chan users said that they were taken from celebrities' iCloud accounts. The accounts are designed to allow iPhone, iPad, and Mac users to synchronize images, settings, calendar information, and other data between devices, but the service has been criticized for being unreliable and confusing. Earlier this year, Jennifer Lawrence herself complained about the service in an interview with MTV.

Several media contacted Apple for more information but they have not commented on this yet.

Submission + - Deputy who fatally struck cyclist while answering email will face no charges

Frosty Piss writes: The LA County District Attorney’s Office declined to press charges against a sheriff’s deputy who was apparently distracted by his mobile digital computer when he fatally struck cyclist and former Napster COO Milton Olin Jr. in Calabasas last December. The deputy was responding to routine work email when he drifted into the bike lane and struck and killed Mr. Olin. As with a lot of Law Enforcement behavior, let's see a "regular" citizen get away with that.

Submission + - Yahoo Stops New Development on YUI (

dnebin writes: Yahoo announced that they will cease new development on their javascript framework YUI, bowing to industry trends towards Node.js, Angular, etc.

The consequence of this evolution in web technologies is that large JavaScript libraries, such as YUI, have been receiving less attention from the community. Many developers today look at large JavaScript libraries as walled gardens they don’t want to be locked into. As a result, the number of YUI issues and pull requests we’ve received in the past couple of years has slowly reduced to a trickle. Most core YUI modules do not have active maintainers, relying instead on a slow stream of occasional patches from external contributors. Few reviewers still have the time to ensure that the patches submitted are reviewed quickly and thoroughly.

Submission + - Feynman Lectures Released Online, Free 2

Anna Merikin writes: In 1964, Richard Feynman delivered a series of seven hour-long lectures at Cornell University which were recorded by the BBC, and in 2009 (with a little help from Bill Gates), were released to the public. The three-volume set may be the most popular collection of physics books ever written, and now the complete online edition has been made available in HTML 5 through a collaboration between Caltech (where Feyman first delivered these talks, in the early 1960s) and The Feynman Lectures Website. The online edition is "high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman's legendary lectures," and, thanks to the implementation of scalable vector graphics, "has been designed for ease of reading on devices of any size or shape; text, figures and equations can all be zoomed without degradation."

Volume I deals mainly with mechanics, radiation and heat; Volume II with electromagnetism and matter; and Volume III with quantum mechanics.

Submission + - Facebook's Ukrainian office is in Russia. Blocks Ukrainians...

mi writes: Ukrainian media are reporting (link in Ukrainian), that Facebook is getting increasingly heavy-handed blocking Ukrainian bloggers. The likely explanation for the observed phenomenon is that Facebook's Ukrainian office is located in Russia and is headed by a Russian citizen (Catherine Skorobogatov). For example, a post calling on Russian mothers to not let their sons go to war was blocked "Due to multiple complaints". Fed up, Ukrainian users are writing directly to Zukerberg to ask him to replace Catherine with someone, who would not be quite as swayed by the "complaints" generated by Russian bots. The last link (in both Ukrainian and English) is also on Facebook. Will it survive for long?

Submission + - The Apache Software Foundation now accepting BitCoin for donations (

rbowen writes: The Apache Software Foundation is the latest not-for-profit organization to accept bitcoin donations, as pointed out by a user on the Bitcoin subreddit.

The organization is well known for their catalog of open-source software, including the ubiquitous Apache web server, Hadoop, Tomcat, Cassandra, and about 150 other projects. Users in the community have been eager to support their efforts using digital currency for quite a while.

The Foundation accepts donations in many different forms: Amazon, PayPal, and they’ll even accept donated cars.

On their contribution page the Apache Software Foundation has published a bitcoin address and QR code. As of this afternoon, the address has already collected on the order of 4 BTC.


Submission + - RIM Gets Defensive At BlackBerry World (

gabbo529 writes: "Research In Motion came out guns blazing at its annual Blackberry World event in Orlando, Fla., this week in order to prove its still got game in the consumer electronics industry. Along with new Blackberry Bold phones, updates to the Playbook and the announcement involving Microsoft, the company directly addressed some of its doubters, namely financial analysts."

Submission + - Microsoft, Juniper won't fix dangerous IPv6 hole (

Julie188 writes: "Security experts are urging Microsoft and Juniper to patch a year-old IPv6 vulnerability so dangerous it can freeze any Windows machine on a LAN in a matter of minutes. The hole is in a technology known as router advertisements, where routers broadcast their IPv6 addresses to help clients find and connect to an IPv6 subnet. Microsoft has downplayed the risk, and refuses to even post a Security Advisory about it, because it says the hole requires a physical connection to the wired LAN. (Experts point out that Microsoft routinely patches less dangerous holes that also require a connection to the LAN.) Juniper says it has delayed a patch because the hole only affects a small number of its products and it wants the IETF to fix the protocol instead. BTW, Linux and Cisco have long ago issued patches. In the past couple of weeks, public disclosure and video demonstrations of how to exploit the vulnerability on Windows have become more available by security professionals trying to get Microsoft to take action."

Submission + - Furniture rental co. spies on PC users (

Joe The Dragon writes: By JOE MANDAK

The Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — A major furniture rental chain provides its customers with computers that allow the company to track keystrokes, take screenshots and even snap webcam pictures of renters using the devices at home, a Wyoming couple said in a lawsuit Tuesday.
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Computer privacy experts said the firm has the right to equip its computers with software it can use to shut off the devices remotely if customers stop paying their bills, but they must be told if they're being monitored.

"If I'm renting a computer ... then I have a right to know what the limitations are and I have a right to know if they're going to be collecting data from my computer," said Annie Anton, a professor and computer privacy expert with North Carolina State University.

But the couple who sued Atlanta-based Aaron's Inc. said they had no clue the computer they rented last year was equipped with a device that could spy on them.

Brian Byrd, 26, and his 24-year-old wife, Crystal, said they didn't even realize that was possible until a store manager in Casper came to their home on Dec. 22.

The manager tried to repossess the computer because he mistakenly believed the Byrds hadn't paid off their rent-to-own agreement. When Brian Byrd showed the manager a signed receipt, the manager showed Byrd a picture of Byrd using the computer — taken by the computer's webcam.

Brian Byrd demanded to know where the picture came from, and the manager "responded that he was not supposed to disclose that Aaron's had the photograph," the lawsuit said.

Byrd told The Associated Press in an exclusive telephone interview, the day before the suit was filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Erie, that he believes the store manager showed him the picture because he "was just trying to throw his weight around and get an easy repossession."

That's when the Byrds contacted police who, their attorney said, have determined the image was shot with the help of spying software, which the lawsuit contends is made by North East, Pa.-based Designerware LLC and is installed on all Aaron's rental computers. Designerware is also being sued.

"It feels like we were pretty much invaded, like somebody else was in our house," Byrd told the AP. "It's a weird feeling, I can't really describe it. I had to sit down for a minute after he showed me that picture."

David Katz, an attorney at Atlanta-based Aaron's, said he was not familiar with the lawsuit, but was hoping to issue a response after reviewing a copy. The company's website says it has more than 1,500 stores in the United States and Canada.

Tim Kelly, who said he is one of the owners of Designerware, also wasn't aware of the lawsuit and declined to comment.

Two attorneys who are experts on the relevant computer privacy laws, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, said it's difficult to tell if either was broken, though both agree the company went too far.

Peter Swire, an Ohio State professor, said using a software "kill switch" is legal because companies can protect themselves from fraud and other crimes.

"But this action sounds like it's stretching the self-defense exception pretty far," Swire said, because the software "was gathering lots of data that isn't needed for self-protection."

Further, Swire said the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act "prohibits unauthorized access to my computer over the Internet. The renter here didn't authorize this kind of access."

Fred Cate, an information law professor at Indiana University agrees that consent is required but said the real question might be: "Whose consent?"

Courts have allowed employers to record employee phone calls because the employers own the phones. Similar questions arise as digital technology becomes more omnipresent, Cate said.

"Should Google let you know they store your search terms? Should Apple let you know they store your location? Should your employer let you know 'We store your e-mail?'" Cate said.

If the Byrds' claims are true, Cate said Aaron's made an error in not notifying customers.

"We always talk about deterrence value. Well it doesn't make sense to put (the software) on there" without telling people what it can do," Cate said. "That's why we all put alarm signs in front of our houses, even if we don't have alarms."

According to the lawsuit, the PC Rental Agent product includes components soldered into the computer's motherboard or otherwise physically attached to the PC's electronics. It therefore cannot be uninstalled and can only be deactivated using a wand, the suit said.

The couple's attorney, John Robinson, of Casper, said the computer is currently in police evidence. Prosecutors in Natrona County, Wyo., did not immediately return a call about the progress of any criminal investigation.

The Byrds want the court to declare their case a class-action, and are seeking unspecified damages and attorneys' fees. The privacy act allows for a penalty of $10,000 or $100 per day per violation, plus punitive damages and other costs, the lawsuit said.

"Crystal gets online before she gets a shower and checks her grades," Brian Byrd said. "Who knows? They could print that stuff off there and take it home with them."

He added: "I've got a 5-year-old boy who runs around all day and sometimes he gets out of the tub running around for 20, 30 seconds while we're on the computer. What if they took a picture of that? I wouldn't want that kind of garbage floating around out there."

Submission + - Man Gouges Eyes After 1 Hour Reading Slashdot v3 (

An anonymous reader writes: After merely one hour of reading articles and comments from the new SLASHDOT v3 interface a man from Unkerville, MD has gouged out his eyes. He is quoted as saying "I would have liked to have kept them, but the pain was unbearable. Additionally, by removing my eyes I have prevented myself from any further viewing of the site which I'm certain would have resulted in either insanity or a shooting spree." Thank god for rusty spoons.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Fox News: IPv6 = six digit IP addresses! ( 3

An anonymous reader writes: Fox News on IPv6: "Web developers have tried to compensate for this problem by creating IPv6 — a system that recognizes six-digit IP addresses rather than four-digit ones". Be sure to get the full story from the trusted science and technology folks at Fox!

Comment Like unfinished books... (Score 1) 2

The way I see it is that little scripts, a snippets of code and other misc libraries are really like writers unfinished manuscripts. They, unless wrapped in the covers and marketed will have very little value to the end buyer (they are not indendent for). So, your best bet would be to wrap at least some of them in finished, well documented product - targeted to someone - fresh developers, small business owner, student or large business it is unlikely that you will make money from it. Good luck.
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Source code marketplace? 2

doesntbyte writes: I spend a lot of my free time writing little programs and libraries that help me accomplish a task or are just a pet project. I'm sure nearly everyone here does this, too. I also contribute to opensource projects a fair amount, too, but sometimes what I'm working on in my free time doesn't match any of their needs very well. After suffering a series of injuries and racking up some medical bills I got to thinking: I have all these great little libraries and algorithms I've created and I'm sure they would be useful to someone.

I guess what I'm wondering is, does anyone know any way I could put these things up for sale? Some of my friends suggested joining RentACoder or ScriptLance, but that's more for selling my time in the future which isn't what I'm really looking for. A friend pointed me to SourceSale, but that looks like it's not getting much action right now. My brother suggested just putting some code up on my personal blog with a PayPal link, but that seems less than optimal as well. Anyone have any ideas?

"You need tender loving care once a week - so that I can slap you into shape." - Ellyn Mustard