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+ - Ukraine launches "Information Army"->

Submitted by mi
mi (197448) writes "When America invaded Iraq in 2003, the world exploded in what Time magazine would later call biggest coordinated protest in history. As New York Times remarked back then, it showed, that the "public opinion" is the second super-power — rivaling the United States.

But, when Russia invaded Ukraine in 2014, the world's reaction was much more muted — and what few protests there were, the organizers were Ukrainian expatriates, not sympathetic locals. The subsequent annexation of a jewel of a province after a "referendum" barely registered too.

President Putin's little undeclared war against its neighbor was given media cover by both Left and Right. While some accused Ukraine's new leaders of being anti-Semitic "Nazis", others — catering to a different audience — dismissed them all as "Jews". Somehow or other, all these people never argued with each other, and their opinions — even when directly opposite — all supported Russia's actions.

Explaining the differences in the world's attitudes by Russia's cunning and precisely-targeted propaganda campaigns (starting in advance of any actual invasions), Ukraine is launching its own "Information Army"..."

Link to Original Source

+ - Developers Race to Develop VR Headsets that Won't Make Users Nauseous

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Nick Wingfield reports at the NYT that for the last couple of years, the companies building virtual reality headsets have begged the public for patience as they strive to create virtual environments that don't make people physically sick. “We’re going to hang ourselves out there and be judged,” says John Carmack, chief technology officer of Oculus, describing what he calls a “nightmare scenario” that has worried him and other Oculus executives. “People like the demo, they take it home, and they start throwing up,” says Carmack. "The fear is if a really bad V.R. product comes out, it could send the industry back to the ’90s." In that era, virtual reality headsets flopped, disappointing investors and consumers. “It left a huge, smoking crater in the landscape,” says Carmack, who is considered an important game designer for his work on Doom and Quake. “We’ve had people afraid to touch V.R. for 20 years.” This time around, the backing for virtual reality is of a different magnitude. Facebook paid $2 billion last year to acquire Oculus. Microsoft is developing its own headset, HoloLens, that mixes elements of virtual reality with augmented reality, a different medium that overlays virtual images on a view of the real world. Google has invested more than $500 million in Magic Leap, a company developing an augmented reality headset. “The challenge is there is so much expectation and anticipation that that could fall away quite quickly if you don’t get the type of traction you had hoped,” says Neil Young

At least one company, Valve, believes it has solved the discomfort problem with headsets. Gabe Newell says Valve has worked hard on its virtual reality technology to eliminate the discomfort, saying that “zero percent of people get motion sick” when they try its system. According to Newell, the reason why no one has gotten sick yet is thanks to Valve’s Lighthouse motion-tracking system, a precise motion-tracking system that is capable of accurately tracking users as they move around a space. In the meantime the next challenge will be convincing media and tech companies to create lots of content to keep users entertained. “Virtual reality has been around for 20 years, and the one thing that has been consistent throughout this is that the technology is not mature enough,” says Brian Blau,. “Today there’s the possibility for that to change, but it’s going to take a while for these app developers to get it right.”"

Comment: Re:Ah, come one, don't we trust the Feds? (Score 0) 88

by mi (#49190739) Attached to: US Marshals Service Refuses To Release Already-Published Stingray Info

Put it this way, Obama can't fire Wheeler without just cause.

He does not need to fire him — he just hired him in the first place. FCC is part of the Executive branch and the commissioners are appointed by the President.

Do you not think, full agreement with the President is one of the job-requirements for the Chairman? It better be, or else the President is not doing his job...

Comment: Re:Ah, come one, don't we trust the Feds? (Score -1, Troll) 88

by mi (#49190655) Attached to: US Marshals Service Refuses To Release Already-Published Stingray Info

WE DONT trust them

Ah, but you do! The well-moderated comment I quoted states, that the Federal Government is the most trust-worthy institution in America...

It must take some special kind of schizophrenia to trust FCC and not trust NSA or the Marshas Service at the same time...

Comment: Ah, come one, don't we trust the Feds? (Score -1, Troll) 88

by mi (#49190433) Attached to: US Marshals Service Refuses To Release Already-Published Stingray Info
If we trust FCC to ensure "fairness" of Internet Service Provision:

If the Federal Government can't determine what's fair, then who can?

why don't we trust the Marshals Service to be fair as well? Are they being controlled by a different President or something?

Comment: Re:US Man? (Score 1) 246

by mi (#49190357) Attached to: Facebook Rant Lands US Man In UAE Jail

nobody can refute your argument without being attacked by feminists

Yes, we have so many of them here on /., it is frightening.

regardless of how poor an analogy it is.

Fortunately, it is not poor at all. Own mistakes, that lead one into trouble, are rarely an excuse for those, who cause the actual trouble itself.

It does not matter, whether the "trouble" is rape or unjust incarceration.

+ - How GE used IT to help make buying a turbine as easy as ordering a pizza online

Submitted by Lemeowski
Lemeowski (3017099) writes "GE Digital Energy CIO Venki Rao provides an interesting look at how his IT team developed a highly-interactive retail experience that makes buying a turbine or electrical components not too different from ordering a book on Amazon or getting updates on your pizza from Domino's pizza tracker when you order online. "Why not give customers a great commercial and shopping experience, even if they’re buying a turbine or electrical components rather than a book?," writes Rao."

Comment: Prison vs. refusal of entry (Score 2, Interesting) 332

by mi (#49189399) Attached to: Quebecker Faces Jail For Not Giving Up Phone Password To Canadian Officials

I don't know how it works in the US, but the Canadian government cannot refuse a Canadian citizen entry into the country. That's a very good thing.

If the only destination in Canada, that such a citizen is allowed to go to, is prison, I doubt, many would prefer that to the (hypothetical) alternative of flying back.

Comment: Re:Israel got a lot of heat for much lesser offens (Score 0) 332

by mi (#49189235) Attached to: Quebecker Faces Jail For Not Giving Up Phone Password To Canadian Officials

The person in question is a Canadian citizen

Thanks, that's informative.

cannot be denied reentry into Canada or sent back

Why can he not? I'd certainly rather return to Dominican Republic, then go to Canadian prison (in winter!).

Has there been an Israeli citizen arrested over such a refusal to open up his e-mail when returning to his country?

Comment: Israel got a lot of heat for much lesser offense.. (Score 3, Interesting) 332

by mi (#49189139) Attached to: Quebecker Faces Jail For Not Giving Up Phone Password To Canadian Officials

The practice of Israeli border-guards of demanding access to e-mail of some people wishing to cross into the country is rather disliked by /. and others.

But the worst, that a non-cooperation would result in there would be an interrogation and a flight back to whence you came from. To actually be arrested and prosecuted for a crime over such a refusal is new... Should we begin divesting from Canada's corporations?

Comment: Re:Why do I need a license for ANY car? (Score 0) 350

by mi (#49189075) Attached to: Would You Need a License To Drive a Self-Driving Car?

Walking and (to a lesser extent) bicycling are inherently less hazardous to other people

So, where is that "clear bright line" you claimed existed?

That said, there are also regulations governing walking and bicycling

Of course! But that's red-herring — I'm not against driving laws. I'm against the licensing requirement — which turned the right of free movement into a privilege.

You seem to think that if there is a right to do something, then that activity cannot be regulated by the government for safety reasons

My whole point is that the right to drive a motorized vehicle on a public road has disappeared while we weren't paying attention. It is not a right any longer. It is a privilege.

This has nothing to do with whether or not it can be regulated.

Comment: Re:US Man? (Score 1) 246

by mi (#49189001) Attached to: Facebook Rant Lands US Man In UAE Jail

He has no one to blame but himself.

He must blame himself for voluntarily accepting UAE jurisdiction, yes — much as a raped girl must blame herself for accepting a spiked drink from a stranger.

That UAE incarcerates people for opinions expressed online is still an outrage, however — much as a rape is regardless of the mistakes made by the victim.

Comment: Freedom of speech is absolute, is not it? (Score 0, Troll) 246

by mi (#49188979) Attached to: Facebook Rant Lands US Man In UAE Jail

Well, as we are often reminded by various Illiberals here at home:

Given the "pragmatic" approach to rights even in the country, which explicitly puts them in writing, should we be surprised, other places are even more restrictive?

Comment: Re:Why do I need a license for ANY car? (Score 0) 350

by mi (#49188181) Attached to: Would You Need a License To Drive a Self-Driving Car?

The pragmatic answer is that some regulation of the roads is necessary in order to avoid bloodshed and chaos.

Which bloodshed and chaos is avoided by making driving a privilege? We still have reckless drivers. All that the licensing gives us is that dealing with them is made a little easier for the Executive government — it is easier to withdraw a privilege than deprive someone of a right.

But that ease is abuse-prone. We deliberately make it harder for the government to fight other "bloodshed and chaos" — consider the 4th and 5th Amendments, the Miranda rights, etc. Generally, we'd rather have a bona-fide criminal go free on occasion, than endanger freedom of the rest of us.

Why don't we apply the same principle to driving? You are, I'm sure, up in arms against NSA eavesdropping — and you would not buy the "it helps prevent bloodshed and chaos" argument in that case. Why the inconsistency?

As you've probably noticed, the real world is driven more by necessity, than by abstract ideological principles

Yes, I have noticed, that the term "pragmatic" is often used where "unprincipled" would've better described the approach.

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