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Comment: Re:Original premise is false (Score 1) 526

by unixisc (#46761505) Attached to: How Does Heartbleed Alter the 'Open Source Is Safer' Discussion?

Many eyeballs may make bugs shallower, but those many eyeballs don't really exist. Source availability does not translate to many people examining that source. People, myself included, may like to build to install packages but that's it. What we need are intelligent bots to constantly trawl source repositories looking for bugs. People just don't have the time any more.

Not just that, the only people who'd find such bugs are the people actually working on those programs. Usually, not their downstream users.

Comment: Re:Even a bestselling novel can have a typo (Score 2) 526

by unixisc (#46761485) Attached to: How Does Heartbleed Alter the 'Open Source Is Safer' Discussion?

The 'millions of eyeballs' meme is just that. How many people actually know how to read code? Just b'cos it's open doesn't mean that it's comprehendible, and therefore, the fact that the code is open & out there doesn't have that much of an advantage, particularly when it's such complex code.

Comment: Re:Fight for the land (Score 1) 268

by unixisc (#46758785) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers
Ukraine would have lost such a war easily: they'd even lose if Russia decided to conquer Ukraine. I agree - the US should take an aggressive policy against fence jumpers. If the US dealt w/ Mexican immigrants in the same manner that Mexico deals w/ Central American immigrants, they wouldn't have an illegal immigration issue.

Comment: Re:Give up your nukes! (Score 1) 268

by unixisc (#46758623) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

Soviet nuclear weapons outside Russia

- Belarus had 81 single warhead missiles stationed on its territory after the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991. They were all transferred to Russia by 1996. In May 1992, Belarus acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.[59]

- Kazakhstan inherited 1,400 nuclear weapons from the Soviet Union, and transferred them all to Russia by 1995. Kazakhstan has since acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.[60]

- Ukraine has acceded to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Ukraine inherited about 5,000 nuclear weapons when it became independent from the Soviet Union in 1991, making its nuclear arsenal the third-largest in the world.[61] By 1996, Ukraine had voluntarily disposed of all nuclear weapons within its territory, disassembling them in Russia.[62]

Kazakhstan & Belarus turned over the weapons to Russia, while Ukraine got them sent to Russia and disassembled.

Comment: Re:Give up your nukes! (Score 1) 268

by unixisc (#46758497) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers
It made sense for Ukraine to give that up. The controls were all still in the Kremlin: it's not like someone in Kiev could have turned them on and launched an attack on Turkey, or Moldova, or Romania, or Slovakia. Those nukes could, however, have been turned on from Moscow. Why would any regime in Kyiv keep weapons on its soil that it had no control over? The Kremlin could theoretically turn them on and send them all at US troops in Iraq, and a retaliation could have involved the bombing of Ukraine. Once the Soviet Union came unravelled, it made sense for Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus to turn over all their nukes to Russia

Comment: Re:Ukraine's borders were changed by use of force (Score 1) 268

by unixisc (#46758367) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

And technically, they gave Crimea to Ukraine back in 1954; the Budapest thing was a reaffirmation that the Soviet Oblast borders were to be followed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1...

How was that a legitimate transfer? Did the population of Crimea have any say in it? Nikita Khrushchev made an arbitrary decision to transfer that peninsula over to his home republic of Ukraine, and it just happened. Neither did the citizens of the RSFSR have any say in whether that bit of land of theirs got to be given to anyone else, nor did their compatriots in the Crimea get to choose either.

Yeah, it would have been better had all of Ukraine gone thru a referendum as to which parts wanted to remain w/ Ukraine, and which parts wanted to go to Russia. Yeah, there is a large Russian minority in Kharkiv, Donetsk and Luhansk, but that doesn't make them majorities. But Ukraine is fine going monolingual Ukrainian only: bilingual states have a terrible precedent - just look @ Quebec. Russians in mainland Ukraine (not in Crimea) who don't want to assimilate into Ukrainian can just cross the border. I see that there is plenty of real estate from the Urals to the Bering Straits.

Comment: Ground reality won't be affected by any of this (Score 1) 268

by unixisc (#46758071) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

in due time all websites will list it under Russia.

Only the Russian websites will do so. The rest will list it as "Ukrainian territory under Russian occupation". Unwieldy, perhaps, but reflecting the truth.

Or, as they keep saying about Jerusalem, it will go something like this: "Annexed by Russia in a move not recognized internationally."

Did most websites - read organizations - recognize Estonia, Latvia & Lithuania - as independent, but under Soviet occupation, during the Cold War? Do most websites - or organizations - recognize Tibet as an independent country under Chinese occupation? The US recognized and recognizes all of them as occupied but independent, but was that true about anyone else?

Jerusalem has always been a part of Israel. Only disputed part was East Jerusalem, which was a part of Jordan before the Six Day War, and became a part of Israel after that. Unlike the rest of Judea & Samaria, Israel annexed East Jerusalem, just like they did the Golan Heights, so both territories are legitimately part of Israel. Yeah, the rest of the world disputes it, but a good portion of them are in bed w/ the OIC, which in fact recognizes all of Israel as 'Palestine', and would like to replace Israel w/ a Pali state.

If anyone disputes that, they might also want to dispute territorial ownership elsewhere in the world, such as Srpska, whose status is identical to the Crimea, except that Serbia isn't as militarily powerful to reclaim it, the way Russia is for Crimea.

Comment: Re:so there are oppressed Russian citizens (Score 1) 312

by unixisc (#46751217) Attached to: Russia Wants To Establish a Permanent Moon Base
Actually, the Russian population has been shrinking. What they should do is send their various minorities - Chechens, Tatars, et al to the moon. Then Russia wouldn't risk Russians becoming a minority in their own country. At some point, Russia can sign a population exchange progam w/ India - move all Indians to Russia, and all Russians to India. There will be enough land for all.

Comment: Crimea, Kosovo & Srpska (Score 2) 312

by unixisc (#46751169) Attached to: Russia Wants To Establish a Permanent Moon Base

Or better example - Kosovo. There was no vote there either - Albanians just moved in & possessed it, and the US supported them & bombed Serbia over Kosovo, and finally recognized its independence. What Russia did in Crimea was a lot more legit than what the West supported in Kosovo.

At the same time, 'self-determination', which is so important for the Albanians, doesn't apply to Bosnian Serbs in Srpska.

Comment: Re:To be expected (Score 1) 675

by unixisc (#46750995) Attached to: The GNOME Foundation Is Running Out of Money

Anyway, I bunged 'em $500, not like it's serious money and they are doing good work.

See? That's the thing, I don't feel like they are doing good work, so I don't want to give them any money. On the other hand, your post has inspired me to donate to an open source project. I'm off to find one worth donating to that needs some money. If anyone has any ideas, let me know.

I can think of some. GNUSTEP. Razor-qt. EToille

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