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Submission + - The Tamagochi Singularity Made Real: Infinite Tamagochi Living on the Internet (

szczys writes: Everyone loves Tamagochi, little electronic keychains spawned in the 90's let you raise your digital pets. Some time ago, XKCD made a quip about an internet based matrix of thousands of these digital entities. That quip is now a reality thanks to elite hardware hacker Jeroen Domburg (aka Sprite_TM). In his recent talk called The Tamagochi Singularity at the Hackaday SuperConference he revealed that he had built an infinite network of virtual Tamagochi by implementing the original hardware as a virtual machine. This included developing AI to keep them happy, and developing a protocol to emulate their IR interactions. But he went even further, hacking an original keychain to use wirelessly as a console which can look in on any of the virtual Tamagochi living on his underground network. This full-stack process is unparalleled in just about every facet: complexity, speed of implementation, awesome factor, and will surely spark legions of other Tamagochi Matrices.

Submission + - The Three Letter Cure for Web Accessibility and Discrimination Problems (

Lauren Weinstein writes: If stable, supported user interface API access were available for services like Google+ — and the many other firms' systems around the Net that currently put users at an accessibility disadvantage — it would be possible for third parties (commercial, nonprofit, individuals, etc.) to write their own customized interfaces for these services to meet specific accessibility needs.

Visually enhanced high contrast interfaces? An interface much easier for someone with limited motor skill acuity? There are a vast range of possibilities for customized interfaces to help an enormous number of users, all of which could operate via the same essential kinds of API mechanisms.

Without APIs, such customized interfaces are usually impractical. Attempts to create customization based on "screen scraping" and techniques like page display CSS modifications are subject to potentially breaking at any time, whenever the underlying format or structure of displayed pages are altered.

You must have stable user interface APIs to make this work.

Submission + - Japan launches its first commercial payload

schwit1 writes: Using its H-IIA rocket, upgraded to lower cost, Japan launched its first commercial payload today, putting Canada’s Telestar 12V into geosynchronous orbit.

It is not clear if Japan’s government-run space program can compete. The rocket is built by Mitsubishi, but it appears owned and operated by JAXA, the equivalent of Japan’s NASA. It has also been a very expensive rocket to launch, as for much of its existence it has been like SLS, more dedicated to producing pork jobs than actually competing with other rocket companies. Whether they can upgrade it sufficiently to compete in price with other rockets is highly questionable.

Nonetheless, that Japan is trying to compete is good news. The more competition, the better. The effort alone will produce new ideas, which in turn can only help lower the cost to get into space, thus making it possible for more people to afford it.

Submission + - Software Freedom Conservancy asks for supporters

paroneayea writes: Software Freedom Conservancy has is asking people to join as supporters to save both their basic work and GPL enforcement. Conservancy is the steward of projects like it, Samba, Wine, BusyBox, QEMU, Inkscape, Selenium, and many more. Conservancy also does much work around GPL enforcement and needs 2,500 members to join in order to save copyleft compliance work. You can join as a member here.

Submission + - How to destroy an American family with a cyberattack (

Daniel_Stuckey writes: Since 2010, the Straters have been under assault from an online campaign of ever-increasing harassment—prank deliveries, smear attacks, high-profile hacks, and threats of violence against schools and law enforcement officials in their name—and it’s slowly torn them apart. Masterminding it all, Blair charges, is a teenage computer hacker from Finland, at war with him over a seemingly minor dispute spun completely out of control.

His family is just collateral damage.

Feed Google News Sci Tech: 2016 Tesla Model X Priced From $81200; All Versions Can Be Ordered Now - Green Car Reports (

Green Car Reports

2016 Tesla Model X Priced From $81200; All Versions Can Be Ordered Now
Green Car Reports
Order books are now open for all versions of the Tesla Model X electric crossover, which will start at $81,200. That includes a $1,200 destination charge, but does not include any Federal, state, or local incentives that might be applied to a purchase.
Tesla Reveals Model X 'Configurator' And Its PricingValueWalk
Tesla's Model X: Promises Kept And BrokenForbes
The Tesla Model X SUV just got a whole lot cheaperBusiness Insider Local
all 159 news articles

Submission + - Second Root Cert-Private Key Pair Found on Dell Computer (

msm1267 writes: A second root certificate and private key, similar to eDellRoot, along with an expired Atheros Authenticode cert and private key used to sign Bluetooth drivers has been found on a Dell Inspiron laptop.
The impact of these two certs is limited compared to the original eDellRoot cert. The related eDellRoot cert is also self-signed but has a different fingerprint than the first one. It has been found only on two dozen machines according to the results of a scan conducted by researchers at Duo Security.
Dell, meanwhile, late on Monday said that it was going to remove the eDellroot certificate from all Dell systems moving forward, and for existing affected customers, it has provided permanent removal instructions, and starting today will push a software update that checks for the eDellroot cert and removes it.

Submission + - Blue Origin "New Shepherd" makes it to space... and back again

Geoffrey.landis writes: Blue Origin's "New Shepherd" suborbital vehicle made its first flight into space (defined as 100 km altitude)... and successfully landed both the capsule (by parachute) and the booster rocket (vertical landing under rocket power). This is the first time that a vehicle has made it into space and had all components fully recovered for reuse since the NASA flights of the X-15 in the 1960s.
Check out the videos at various places on the web

Submission + - Scientists Produce Graphene 100 Times Cheaper Than Ever Before (

Zothecula writes: Since first being synthesized by Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov at the University of Manchester in 2004, there has been an extensive effort to exploit the extraordinary properties of graphene. However the cost of graphene in comparison to more traditional electronic materials has meant that its uptake in electronic manufacturing has been slow. Now researchers at the University of Glasgow have discovered a way to create large sheets of graphene using the same type of cheap copper used to manufacture lithium-ion batteries.

Submission + - Quantum Breakthrough Signals Tighter Telecoms Security (

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers have outlined a new quantum technology breakthrough which could improve the encryption of data and its secure exchange over long distance telecommunications networks. The scientists describe how quantum entanglement can allow separated particles to share properties, enabling information to be encoded in quantum particles. Any disruption from an unauthorised third party will change the properties of the quantum correlations and immediately become detectable, as well as making the information impossible to copy. In this recent study the team, demonstrating what could be developed into a ‘quantum internet’, achieved a world-first by transferring a quantum bit (qubit) over a 2km length of standard fibre optic cable.

Submission + - Why Black Friday and Cyber Monday Are Pretty Much Meaningless Now writes: Brad Tuttle writes at Money Magazine that while the terms “Black Friday” and “Cyber Monday” are more ubiquitous than ever, the importance of the can’t-miss shopping days is undeniably fading. “I think what you’re seeing now is the start or middle of a trend where Black Friday decreases in importance,” says analyst Yory Wurmser. “It’s probably still going to be a significant shopping day, but at the same time it’s probably going to lose its singular significance in the season.” Retailers seem to want it both ways: They want shoppers to spend money long before these key shopping events, and yet they also want shoppers to turn out in full force to make purchases over the epic Black Friday weekend. When they use the “Cheap Stuff!” card day after day and week after week, the deals on any single day stop seeming special. The bottom line is that shifting spending patterns means that holiday sales are now dispersed over a longer period. “You can try to get the consumer to spend earlier," says Marshal Cohen. "But that doesn’t mean there’s more money in their pockets."

The true story behind Black Friday is not as sunny as retailers might have you believe. Back in the 1950s, police in the city of Philadelphia used the term to describe the chaos that ensued on the day after Thanksgiving, when hordes of suburban shoppers and tourists flooded into the city in advance of the big Army-Navy football game held on that Saturday every year. Not only would Philly cops not be able to take the day off, but they would have to work extra-long shifts dealing with the additional crowds and traffic. Shoplifters would also take advantage of the bedlam in stores to make off with merchandise, adding to the law enforcement headache. Sometime in the late 1980s, however, retailers found a way to reinvent Black Friday and turn it into something that reflected positively, rather than negatively, on them and their customers. The result was the “red to black” concept of the holiday mentioned earlier, and the notion that the day after Thanksgiving marked the occasion when America’s stores finally turned a profit.

Submission + - GlassRAT Targets Chinese Nationals, Lurked for 3 Years Undetected (

chicksdaddy writes: RSA researchers issued a report today ( about a remote access trojan (or RAT) program dubbed “GlassRAT” that they are linking to sophisticated and targeted attacks on “Chinese nationals associated with large multinational corporations," The Security Ledger reports. (

Discovered by RSA in February of this year, GlassRAT was first created in 2012 and “appears to have operated, stealthily, for nearly 3 years in some environments,” in part with the help of a legitimate certificate from a prominent Chinese software publisher and signed by Symantec and Verisign, RSA reports.

The software is described as a “simple but capable RAT” that packs reverse shell features that allow attackers to remotely control infected computers as well as transfer files and list active processes. The dropper program associated with the file poses as the Adobe Flash player, and was named “Flash.exe” when it was first detected.

RSA discovered it on the PC of a Chinese national working for a large, U.S. multi-national corporation. RSA had been investigating suspicious network traffic on the enterprise network. RSA says telemetry data and anecdotal reports suggest that GlassRAT may principally be targeting Chinese nationals or other Chinese speakers, in China and elsewhere, since at least early 2013.

RSA said it has discovered links between GlassRAT and earlier malware families including Mirage, Magicfire and PlugX. Those applications have been linked to targeted campaigns against the Philippine military and the Mongolian government. (

Not only is UNIX dead, it's starting to smell really bad. -- Rob Pike