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Submission + - Lights, Camera, Experiment!

theodp writes: The New Yorker's Jamie Holmes takes a look at How Methods Videos Are Making Science Smarter, helping scientists replicate elaborate experiments in a way that the text format of traditional journals simply can't. The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JOVE), for instance, is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that now has a database of more than four thousand videos that are usually between ten and fifteen minutes long, ranging in subject from biology and chemistry to neuroscience and medicine. "Complexity was always an issue," JOVE co-founder, Moshe Pritsker explains. "Even when biology was a much smaller enterprise, it relied on a degree of specialized craft in the laboratory. But, since the end of the nineties, we’ve seen a huge influx of new technologies into biology: genomics, proteomics, technologies like microarrays, complex genetic methods, and sophisticated microscopy and imaging techniques." And, as the popularity of the decidedly non-peer reviewed Crazy Russian Hacker's YouTube videos shows, methods videos aren't just for research scientists!

Submission + - Chris Christie Proposes Tracking Immigrants the Way FedEx Tracks Packages->

PolygamousRanchKid writes: Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said on Saturday that if he were elected president he would combat illegal immigration by creating a system to track foreign visitors the way FedEx tracks packages.

I just spit out my coffee . . .

Mr. Christie, who is far back in the pack of candidates for the Republican presidential nomination, said at a campaign event in New Hampshire that he would ask the chief executive of FedEx, Frederick W. Smith, to devise the tracking system.“At any moment, FedEx can tell you where that package is. It’s on the truck. It’s at the station. It’s on the airplane,” Mr. Christie told the crowd in Laconia, N.H. “Yet we let people come to this country with visas, and the minute they come in, we lose track of them.” He added: “We need to have a system that tracks you from the moment you come in.”

I'm sure foreign tourist will be amused when getting a bar code sticker slapped on their arm.

A FedEx spokeswoman declined to comment on Mr. Christie’s remarks.

Mr. Christie, get your lips away from the crack pipe.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Do We Need More Emojis?->

mikejuk writes: The Unicode Consortium has accepted another 38 emoji characters as candidates for Unicode 9.0, with new characters including bacon and a duck on the list. Why could we possibly need a duck?
Many of the new characters are the ‘other half’ of gender-matched pairs, so the Dancer emoji (which is usually rendered as Apple’s salsa dancing woman) gets a Man Dancing emoji, who frankly looks like a cross between John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever and your dad at the wedding disco.Would Salsa Dancing Woman really dance with Dad Dancer?
I doubt it.
Other additions include carrot, cucumber, and avocado, and bacon.
How did the emoji world survive without a bacon emoji until now?
The list of additions is rounded off with new animal emojis. Some are the ‘missing’ zodiac symbols (lion and crab). Others are as baffling as ever – is there *really* a demand for a mallard duck? Sorry it's in fact a drake!

Link to Original Source

Submission + - MIAOW open source GPU debuts at Hot Chips->

alexvoica writes: The first general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) now available as open-source RTL was unveiled at the Hot Chips event. Although the GPGPU is in an early and relatively crude stage, it is another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform, said Karu Sankaralingam, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Sankaralingam led the team that designed the Many-core Integrated Accelerator of Wisconsin (MIAOW). A 12-person team developed the MIAOW core in 36 months. Their goal was simply to create a functional GPGPU without setting any specific area, frequency, power or performance goals. The resulting GPGPU uses just 95 instructions and 32 compute units in its current design. It only supports single-precision operations. Students are now adding a graphics pipeline to the design, a job expected to take about six months.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Cliff Bleszinski's Boss Key Productions Unveils LawBreakers Game Trailer->

MojoKid writes: Boss Key Productions has posted its first trailer of "LawBreakers" (formerly Project Bluestreak), a futuristic game title that's set to release on multiple platforms in 2016. The trailer shows off some of the characters and classes that you'll have access to on both sides of the law — yes, you'll have to decide whether you're fighting for the law or the lawbreakers. The game's setting is Earth, though not as you know it now. This is a future version of Earth where gravity is busted. The government, in its infinite wisdom, screwed up some testing on the moon and managed to split its surface, an event that came to be known as "The Shattering." Gears of War creator Cliff Bleszinski is one of the co-founders of Boss Key Productions, the other of which is Arjan Brussee, the main coder behind both Jazz Jackrabbit games and co-founder Guerrilla Games.
Link to Original Source

Feed Google News Sci Tech: 'Living Fossils' Rediscovered In Pacific Ocean - Immortal News->


Immortal News

'Living Fossils' Rediscovered In Pacific Ocean
Immortal News
“Living fossils” derive their title from their continued existence over periods of hundreds of millions of years. The shelled creatures known as “nautiluses” submerged in the oceans' depths are related to other unique animals such as squids and ...
Researchers Find Rare “Living Fossil” SpeciesThe Hullabaloo Online
Rare Nautilus Spotted in South PacificMaine News Online
Bizarre marine creature dubbed one of world's rarest animals seen for first ... Mirror.co.uk
Uncover Michigan
all 83 news articles

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Abusing symbolic links like it's 1999->

An anonymous reader writes: For the past couple of years I’ve been researching Windows elevation of privilege attacks. This might be escaping sandboxing or gaining system privileges. One of the techniques I’ve used multiple times is abusing the symbolic link facilities of the Windows operating system to redirect privileged code to create files or registry keys to escape the restrictive execution context. Symbolic links in themselves are not vulnerabilities, instead they’re useful primitives for exploiting different classes of vulnerabilities such as resource planting or time-of-check time-of-use.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - LEDs technology set to get cheaper, efficient->

hypnosec writes: One of the biggest hurdles in adoption of LED lighting is the cost involved and the inability of energy savings to offset these high costs. This is about to change as a new research has shown promise of a efficient yet cheaper LED technology. The new LED technology, which is said to have the potential of revolutionising lighting technology, has been developed by Zhibin Yu, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Florida State University. The new technology involves a combination of organic and inorganic materials. The newly developed material, which dissolve easily and can be applied like paint to light bulbs, shines a blue, green or red light. This is not its selling point though as what makes this technology special is the fact that it only requires one laying unlike traditional LED lights which require four or five layers of material on top of each other to create a product with desired effects.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Launching space program Moonspike October 1 2015->

Kristian vonBengtson writes: Im the co-founder of Copenhagen Suborbitals, a DIY manned space program, which I left in 2014. This year, we (a great crew) have been preparing for the next adventure with a mission plan going public Oct 1. Go sign up and join the project www.moonspike.com -
Ad Astra
Kristian von Bengtson

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Wired has a story on the Integrated Space Plan's 100 year view of space planning->

garyebickford writes: Wired Magazine has posted an article about the new 2015 version of the Integrated Space Plan, updated 14 years after the last version and descended directly from the original 1989 version. The original one was printed in the thousands, distributed by Rockwell, and appeared on walls throughout the space industry. One even hung behind the NASA administrator's desk. The new one is prettier, great for dorm room walls and classrooms, and Integrated Space Analytics, the company behind it, promises to expand their website into an up-to-date, live interactive tool. This is a great new beginning after over 30 years.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Which dataplan provider to use when traveling in the USA

An anonymous reader writes: I am visiting USA 3-4 times a year and I need a data service. I also need to keep my cell phone number, so swapping the SIM card in my phone is not an option. I have bought those 19.95$ phones in Best-Buy to get a local number, but those were voice only. So I have been thinking about getting a MiFi hotspot.

I have been looking at pre-paid plans from Verizon(only 700 LTE band for their pre-paid hotspot), AT&T, T-Mobile etc. perhaps to put in a MiFi hotspot or buy a hotspot from a provider, but have no idea which one to use, their reputation, real life coverage etc. It is clear that all data plans in the USA are really expensive, I get 100GB monthly traffic with my Scandinavian provider for the same price as 6-8 GB montly in the US, which I guess could be a problem with our Apple phones as they do not recognize a metered WiFi hotspot. But that is another issue.
I travel all over but most of the time outside the big cities and my experience from roaming with my own phone and the cheap local phone so far tells me that coverage fluctuates wildly depending on the operator.

Submission + - Systemd Absorbs "su" Command Functionality

jones_supa writes: With a pull request systemd now supports a su command functional and can create privileged sessions that are fully isolated from the original session. The su command is seen bad because what it is supposed to do is ambiguous. On one hand it's supposed to open a new session and change a number of execution context parameters, and on the other it's supposed to inherit a lot concepts from the originating session. Lennart Poettering's long story short: "`su` is really a broken concept. It will given you kind of a shell, and it's fine to use it for that, but it's not a full login, and shouldn't be mistaken for one." The replacement command provided by systemd is machinectl shell.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Can any wireless tech challenge fiber to the home? 2

danielmorrison writes: In Holland, MI (birthplace of Slashdot) we're working toward fiber to the home. A handful of people have asked why not go wireless instead? I know my reasons (speed, privacy, and we have an existing fiber loop) but are any wireless technologies good enough that cities should consider them? If so, what technologies and what’s had success stories?

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