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AirMagnet Wi-Fi Security Tool Takes Aim At Drones 4

Posted by timothy
from the command-and-control-is-next dept.
alphadogg (971356) writes "In its quest to help enterprises seek out and neutralize all threats to their Wi-Fi networks, AirMagnet is now looking to the skies. In a free software update to its AirMagnet Enterprise product last week, the Wi-Fi security division of Fluke Networks added code specifically crafted to detect the Parrot AR Drone, a popular unmanned aerial vehicle that costs a few hundred dollars and can be controlled using a smartphone or tablet. Drones themselves don't pose any special threat to Wi-Fi networks, and AirMagnet isn't issuing air pistols to its customers to shoot them down. The reason the craft are dangerous is that they can be modified to act as rogue access points and sent into range of a victim's wireless network, potentially breaking into a network to steal data."

+ - AirMagnet Wi-Fi security tool takes aim at drones->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "In its quest to help enterprises seek out and neutralize all threats to their Wi-Fi networks, AirMagnet is now looking to the skies. In a free software update to its AirMagnet Enterprise product last week, the Wi-Fi security division of Fluke Networks added code specifically crafted to detect the Parrot AR Drone, a popular unmanned aerial vehicle that costs a few hundred dollars and can be controlled using a smartphone or tablet. Drones themselves don’t pose any special threat to Wi-Fi networks, and AirMagnet isn’t issuing air pistols to its customers to shoot them down. The reason the craft are dangerous is that they can be modified to act as rogue access points and sent into range of a victim’s wireless network, potentially breaking into a network to steal data."
Link to Original Source
Technology

MIT' Combines Carbon Foam and Graphite Flakes For Efficient Solar Steam Generati 42

Posted by timothy
from the science-fiction-future-awaits dept.
rtoz (2530056) writes Researchers at MIT have developed a new spongelike material structure which can use 85% of incoming solar energy for converting water into steam. This spongelike structure has a layer of graphite flakes and an underlying carbon foam. This structure has many small pores. It can float on the water, and it will act as an insulator for preventing heat from escaping to the underlying liquid. As sunlight hits the structure, it creates a hotspot in the graphite layer, generating a pressure gradient that draws water up through the carbon foam. As water seeps into the graphite layer, the heat concentrated in the graphite turns the water into steam. This structure works much like a sponge. This new material is able to use 85 percent of incoming solar energy for converting water into steam. It is a significant improvement over recent approaches to solar-powered steam generation. And, this setup loses very little heat in the process, and can produce steam at relatively low solar intensity. i-e if scaled up, this setup will not require complex, costly systems to highly concentrate sunlight.

+ - Black Hat presentation on TOR suddenly cancelled->

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "A presentation on a low-budget method to unmask users of a popular online privacy tool, TOR, will no longer go ahead at the Black Hat security conference early next month. The talk was nixed by the legal counsel with Carnegie Mellon’s Software Engineering Institute after a finding that materials from researcher Alexander Volynkin were not approved for public release, according to a notice on the conference’s website. https://www.blackhat.com/lates... Volynkin, a research scientist with the university’s Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) was due to give a talk entitled “You Don’t Have to be the NSA to Break Tor: Deanonymizing Users on a Budget” at the conference, which take places Aug. 6-7 in Last Vegas."
Link to Original Source

+ - NVIDIA Launches SHIELD Tablet Powered By Tegra K1 And SHIELD Wireless Controller->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid (1002251) writes "NVIDIA just officially announced the SHIELD Tablet (powered by their Tegra K1 SoC) and SHIELD wireless controller. As the SHIELD branding implies, the new SHIELD tablet and wireless controller builds upon the previously-released, Android-based SHIELD portable to bring a gaming-oriented tablet to consumers. The SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller are somewhat of mashup of the SHIELD portable and the Tegra Note 7, but featuring updated technology and better build materials. You could think of the SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller as an upgraded SHIELD portable gaming device, with the screen de-coupled from the controller. The device features NVIDIA's Tegra K1 SoC, paired to 2GB of RAM and an 8", full-HD IPS display, with a native resolution of 1920x1200. There are also a pair of 5MP cameras on the SHIELD Tablet (front and rear), 802.11a/b/g/n 2x2 MIMO WiFi configuration, GPS, a 9-axis motion sensor, and Bluetooth 4.0 LE. In addition to the WiFi-only version (which features 16GB of internal storage), NVIDIA has a 32GB version coming with LTE connectivity as well. NVIDIA will begin taking pre-orders for the SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller immediately."
Link to Original Source

+ - New spongelike material for effective Solar steam generation

Submitted by rtoz
rtoz (2530056) writes "Researchers at MIT have developed a new spongelike material structure which can use 85% of incoming solar energy for converting water into steam.

This spongelike structure has a layer of graphite flakes and an underlying carbon foam. This structure has many small pores.

It can float on the water, and it will act as an insulator for preventing heat from escaping to the underlying liquid.

As sunlight hits the structure, it creates a hotspot in the graphite layer, generating a pressure gradient that draws water up through the carbon foam. As water seeps into the graphite layer, the heat concentrated in the graphite turns the water into steam. This structure works much like a sponge.

This new material is able to use 85 percent of incoming solar energy for converting water into steam. It is a significant improvement over recent approaches to solar-powered steam generation. And, this setup loses very little heat in the process, and can produce steam at relatively low solar intensity. i-e if scaled up, this setup will not require complex, costly systems to highly concentrate sunlight."

+ - Google May Bring Wi-Fi To New York City Pay Phones->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Google was among 60 entities that attended a meeting on May 12 to discuss a project to replace or supplement as many as 10,000 pay phones around the city, turning the relics of the past into 'communication points' of the future with free Wi-Fi and cellphone charging. The list came to light in a Bloomberg News report on Monday. Other participants included Samsung, IBM, Cisco Systems, Verizon Wireless, Cablevision and Time Warner Cable."
Link to Original Source
Piracy

For Now, UK Online Pirates Will Get 4 Warnings -- And That's It 48

Posted by timothy
from the on-high-alert dept.
New submitter Tmackiller writes with an excerpt from VG247.com: The British government has decriminalised online video game, music and movie piracy, scrapping fuller punishment plans after branding them unworkable. Starting in 2015, persistent file-sharers will be sent four warning letters explaining their actions are illegal, but if the notes are ignored no further action will be taken. The scheme, named the Voluntary Copyright Alert Programme (VCAP), is the result of years of talks between ISPs, British politicians and the movie and music industries. The UK's biggest providers – BT, TalkTalk, Virgin and Sky – have all signed up to VCAP, and smaller ISPs are expected to follow suit. VCAP replaces planned anti-piracy measures that included cutting users' internet connections and creating a database of file-sharers. Geoff Taylor, chief executive of music trade body the BPI, said VCAP was about "persuading the persuadable, such as parents who do not know what is going on with their net connection." He added: "VCAP is not about denying access to the internet. It's about changing attitudes and raising awareness so people can make the right choice." Officials will still work to close and stem funding to file-sharing sites, but the news appears to mean that the British authorities have abandoned legal enforcement of online media piracy. Figures recently published by Ofcom said that nearly a quarter of all UK downloads were of pirated content." Tmackiller wants to know "Will this result in more private lawsuits against file sharers by the companies involved?"

+ - EFF Releases Browser Extension That Blocks Third-Party Tracking->

Submitted by jfruh
jfruh (300774) writes "The EFF has released the beta version of Privacy Badger, a browser plug-in for Chrome and Firefox that blocks third-party trackers. While Privacy Badger doesn't block advertising per se, so many web ads are built around tracking your moves around the web that the ads you will see will be different and fewer."
Link to Original Source

+ - Seawater fuel: powering the next-generation of ships

Submitted by stephendavion
stephendavion (2872091) writes "A team of US Navy scientists recently announced they had converted seawater into fuel. The technology is described as a ‘game changer’ which could drastically reduce the US military’s dependency on fossil fuels. Could the technology solve the current fuel dilemma in commercial shipping as well? In April, scientists from the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) announced they had successfully powered a remote-controlled aircraft using nothing but seawater. By extracting carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen and converting it to a liquid hydrocarbon fuel, researchers at the NRL's Materials Science and Technology Division had proved that seawater fuel was actually possible."

Google News Sci Tech: Tor break talk axed from Black Hat conference - ZDNet->

From feed by feedfeeder

Firstpost

Tor break talk axed from Black Hat conference
ZDNet
A proposed talk by two Carnegie Mellon University researchers demonstrating how to de-anonymise Tor users on a budget of US$3,000 has been axed from the Black Hat USA 2014 conference in Las Vegas next month. The talk, 'You don't have to be the...
Black Hat presentation on TOR suddenly cancelledCIO Magazine

all 38 news articles

Link to Original Source
Privacy

A New Form of Online Tracking: Canvas Fingerprinting 89

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the subverting-features-for-evil-and-profit dept.
New submitter bnortman (922608) was the first to write in with word of "a new research paper discussing a new form of user fingerprinting and tracking for the web using the HTML 5 <canvas> ." globaljustin adds more from an article at Pro Publica: Canvas fingerprinting works by instructing the visitor's Web browser to draw a hidden image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, the images can be used to assign each user's device a number that uniquely identifies it. ... The researchers found canvas fingerprinting computer code ... on 5 percent of the top 100,000 websites. Most of the code was on websites that use the AddThis social media sharing tools. Other fingerprinters include the German digital marketer Ligatus and the Canadian dating site Plentyoffish. ... Rich Harris, chief executive of AddThis, said that the company began testing canvas fingerprinting earlier this year as a possible way to replace cookies ...

+ - Brits ignore government's parental-control broadband filters->

Submitted by nk497
nk497 (1345219) writes "Broadband customers are overwhelmingly choosing not to use parental-control systems foisted on ISPs by the government — with takeup in the single-digits for three of the four major broadband providers. Last year, the government pushed ISPs to roll out network-level filters, forcing new customers to make an "active" decision about whether they want to use them or not. Only 5% of new BT customers signed up, 8% opted in for Sky and 4% for Virgin Media. TalkTalk rolled out a parental-control system two years before the government required it and has a much better takeup, with 36% of customers signing up for it. The report, from regulator Ofcom, didn't bother to judge if the filters actually work, however."
Link to Original Source

+ - How bad UI complicated the KAL007 flight crisis 31 years ago->

Submitted by Crayon Kid
Crayon Kid (700279) writes "31 years ago, on September 1, 1983, Korean Airlines flight 007 (KAL007) was shot down by a Soviet fighter, an incident which would go on to develop into one of the most tense moments of the Cold War.

On that morning, 23 year old John C. Beck, while working in the US Embassy in Tokyo, inadvertedly hit the wrong key and caused the loss of all ongoing work on a report on the incident being prepared by diplomats and translators for President Reagan, a fact which delayed the official statement from the US administration and caused several unfortunate side effects.

[...] I highlighted her workstation and hit the F6 key to reset. But my screen went temporarily black and then seemed to be starting again. I realized that I had mistakenly hit F7 and reset all the workstations in the embassy.

[...] I, naturally, felt terrible and was, appropriately, fired.

It was only weeks later that I began to comprehend the effects of this single keystroke mistake.

He seems to have taken this incident in stride and accepted the consequences. But it doesn't change the fact that the user interface design seems horrid: it made it possible to destroy the work in progress on the entire network with a single keystroke, without even a confirmation, and furthermore placed that key right next to one used much more often and with less severe effects.

It would be very interesting to see if this design was simply bad or if it was intentional – if for instance they wanted to be able to destroy everything at the touch of a button in case of a security emergency."

Link to Original Source

Kill Ugly Processor Architectures - Karl Lehenbauer

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