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Comment Re:It's no ARMv8 (Score 1) 21

It depends hugely on the workload and it also depends a lot on the core. The ARMv8 ecosystem is quite diverse. For example, you have some players like nVidia's Project Denver, which fuses some of their GPU ideas with designs inherited from Transmeta. The Denver core is VLIW, but with staggered pipelines, so that results from one instruction in a VLIW bundle can be fed into the next (without needing rename registers, which are one of the biggest power sinks on a modern OoO CPU). When you start a program running, there's a simple decoder that turns ARM instructions into fairly inefficient VLIW instructions, but after a little while hot loops are optimised by a JIT and get a lot faster.

At the other end of the design spectrum, Cavium's Thunder X has 48 ARMv8 cores (not hyperthreads) per die, and supports dual-socket configurations for up to 96 processors per board. Individually the cores are weaker than a Xeon, but on some workloads (network routing, some database serving), they're pretty impressive in aggregate. That many physical cores also makes it easier to load balance VMs in a hosted environment. This is especially good for the kind of workload where most clients are idle for a lot of the time, but when they're busy they're very busy.

Comment Re:the comparison is pointless (Score 1) 42

-Os frankly is of little interest to desktop developers. Heck, I spend quite a bit of my time on 8 bitters these days, and I think you're being pedantic.

You might want to tell Apple that, as they compile everything with -Os. It turns out that instruction cache pressure still matters, and matters a lot more if you're in the kind of environment where multiple applications are competing for space.

Comment Re:Willl any of this affect Swift performance? (Score 1) 42

Objective-C++ also works pretty well now (including in the open source implementation), to the point that I generally prefer C++ containers to Objective-C ones. std::unordered_map seems to be faster than NSMutableDictionary for most things, and has the added advantage that you can have primitive types as keys or values without resorting to boxing. The big problem for Swift is that the FFI to C is fine, but the FFI to C++ is basically nonexistent.

Comment Re:Yay for OSX (Score 1) 42

and I believe are its biggest contributors

I'm not 100% sure, but I think that Google passed Apple as the largest single contributor (incrementally, at least, not cumulatively) somewhere in the 3.5 to 3.7 time frame. A lot of the Apple compiler team has been busy with Swift.

Networking

Ask Slashdot: Can Any Wireless Tech Challenge Fiber To the Home? 153

New submitter danielmorrison writes: In Holland, MI (birthplace of Slashdot) we're working toward fiber to the home. A handful of people have asked why not go wireless instead? I know my reasons (speed, privacy, and we have an existing fiber loop) but are any wireless technologies good enough that cities should consider them? If so, what technologies and what cities have had success stories?
Earth

Citi Report: Slowing Global Warming Could Save Tens of Trillions of Dollars 201

Layzej writes with news carried by The Guardian about a report published by the Global Perspectives & Solutions division of Citibank (America's third-largest bank) examining the costs and benefits of a low-carbon future. The report examined two hypothetical futures: one "business as usual," and the other (the "Action" scenario) which includes an aggressive move to reduce energy use and carbon emission. From the article: "One of the most interesting findings in the report is that the investment costs for the two scenarios are almost identical. In fact, because of savings due to reduced fuel costs and increased energy efficiency, the Action scenario is actually a bit cheaper than the Inaction scenario. Coupled with the fact the total spend is similar under both action and inaction, yet the potential liabilities of inaction are enormous, it is hard to argue against a path of action." But there will be winners and losers, says the report: "The biggest loser stands to be the coal industry, where we estimate cumulative spend under our Action scenario could be $11.6 trillion less than in our Inaction scenario over the next quarter century, with renewables, wind and nuclear (as well as energy efficiency) the main beneficiaries."

Submission + - Citi report: slowing global warming would save tens of trillions of dollars->

Layzej writes: Citi Global Perspectives & Solutions (GPS), a division within Citibank (America’s third-largest bank), recently published a report looking at the economic costs and benefits of a low-carbon future. The report considered two scenarios: “Inaction,” which involves continuing on a business-as-usual path, and Action scenario which involves transitioning to a low-carbon energy mix.

One of the most interesting findings in the report is that the investment costs for the two scenarios are almost identical. In fact, because of savings due to reduced fuel costs and increased energy efficiency, the Action scenario is actually a bit cheaper than the Inaction scenario. Coupled with the fact the total spend is similar under both action and inaction, yet the potential liabilities of inaction are enormous, it is hard to argue against a path of action.

But there will be winners and losers: The biggest loser stands to be the coal industry, where we estimate cumulative spend under our Action scenario could be $11.6 trillion less than in our Inaction scenario over the next quarter century, with renewables, wind and nuclear (as well as energy efficiency) the main beneficiaries.

Link to Original Source
Stats

Windows 10 Grabs 5.21% Market Share, Passing Windows Vista and Windows 8 201

An anonymous reader writes: The effects of a free upgrade to Windows 10 are starting to trickle in. Available for just over a month, Windows 10 has now captured more than 5 percent market share, according to the latest figures from Net Applications. In just four weeks, Windows 10 has already been installed on over 75 million PCs. Microsoft is aiming to have 1 billion devices running Windows 10 "in two to three years," though that includes not just PCs, but smartphones, consoles, and other devices as well.

Submission + - Windows 10 Grabs 5.21% Market Share, Passing Windows Vista And Windows 8

An anonymous reader writes: The effects of a free upgrade to Windows 10 are starting to trickle in. Available for just over a month, Windows 10 has now captured more than 5 percent market share, according to the latest figures from Net Applications. In just four weeks, Windows 10 has already been installed on over 75 million PCs. Microsoft is aiming to have 1 billion devices running Windows 10 “in two to three years,” though that includes not just PCs, but smartphones, consoles, and other devices as well.

Submission + - Watch Your WiFi Router: It Might be Serving Ads

dkatana writes: It was all over the news last week that AT&T hotspost were using "in-browser content insertion technology" from RaGaPa to insert additional ads on the web pages of their customers. Some people started to complain that their mobile devices started showing unusual ads, some of them taking up half a screen,

Now, thanks to similar technology, your home router could be serving ads too.

Your ISP could be using your home router (the one they provided) to offer WiFi offloading to their mobile customers. Also the router manufacturer could, in theory, send an OTA update to make your router an ad serving machine.

The best thing to do is to purchase your own router and flash it with an open source firmware such as OpenWrt.

186,000 Miles per Second. It's not just a good idea. IT'S THE LAW.

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