Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - *.RU based Photo Sharing is also hosting Pedophiles?

Submitted by TchrBabe
TchrBabe (3589445) writes "Even "safe" pictures of your children online aren't safe anymore. Who would have thought this?!? (insert sarcasm tag here).

According to this article in the Sunday Express, pedophiles are gleaning family and "normal" photos of children from social media postings and sharing them with sexual commentary and discussion.

Once again, social media is only as safe as the level of common sense and privacy that the individuals use (which often isn't much)."

+ - "TrueCrypt must not die" - TrueCrypt continuation effort underway

Submitted by Runefox
Runefox (905204) writes "In the wake of the confusing and abrupt apparent demise of TrueCrypt, many have been left without a continuing, open source means of cross-platform encryption. TrueCrypt.ch, a Switzerland-hosted webpage, sprung up recently in a bid to reorganize and continue development of recently-discontinued TrueCrypt. While no development efforts have yet begun, according to their current development status:

Currently the news is still in flux, and we will support any efforts in reviving TrueCrypt. If other Initiatives arise we will try to support them. At the moment we want to make sure everyone who wants can continue to use TrueCrypt.

They have already gathered the TrueCrypt source code into GitHub and made available for download the latest working versions of TrueCrypt, with the disclaimer that they are currently unmaintained. According to the website, the choice to use Swiss web hosting was made because "If there have been legal problems with the US, the independent hosting in Switzerland will guarantee no interruption due to legal threats.""

+ - How Silk Road Bounced Back from Its Multimillion-Dollar Hack ->

Submitted by Daniel_Stuckey
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "“I am sweating as I write this I must utter words all too familiar to this scarred community: We have been hacked.” That is what Defcon, the current administrator of the infamous black market site Silk Road (the 2.0 version), wrote back in February on the site’s forums. In total, an estimated $2.7 million worth of bitcoin belonging to users and staff of the site was stolen. Some in the Silk Road community suspected that the hack might have involved staff members of the site itself, echoing scams on other sites. Project Black Flag closed down after its owner scampered with all of their customers' bitcoin, and after that users of Sheep Marketplace had their funds stolen, in an incident that has never been conclusively proven as an inside job or otherwise. Many site owners would probably have given up at this point, and perhaps attempted to join another site, or start up a new one under a different alias. Why would you bother to pay back millions of dollars when you could just disappear into the digital ether? But Silk Road appears to be trying to rebuild, and to repay users' lost bitcoins."
Link to Original Source

+ - Parents' Privacy Concerns Kill Bill Gates' $100M inBloom Initiative

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "As things turn out, All Your Child's Data Are Not Belong To inBloom, the Bill Gates-bankrolled and News Corp. subsidiary-implemented data initiative that sought to personalize learning. GeekWire's Tricia Duryee reports that inBloom, which was backed by $100 million from The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and others, is closing up shop after parents worried that its database technology was violating their children's privacy. According to NY Times coverage (reg.), the inBloom database tracked 400 different data fields about students — including family relationships ("foster parent" or "father's significant other”") and reasons for enrollment changes ("withdrawn due to illness" or "leaving school as a victim of a serious violent incident") — that parents objected to, prompting some schools to recoil from the venture. In a statement, inBloom CEO Iwan Streichenberger said that personalized learning was still an emerging concept, and complained that the venture had been "the subject of mischaracterizations and a lightning rod for misdirected criticism." He added, "It is a shame that the progress of this important innovation has been stalled because of generalized public concerns about data misuse, even though inBloom has world-class security and privacy protections that have raised the bar for school districts and the industry as a whole [although it was still apparently vulnerable to Heartbleed]." As far as Gates goes, the world's richest man has a couple of irons left in the data-driven personalized learning fire via his ties to Code.org, which seeks 7 years of participating K-12 students' data, and Khan Academy, which recently attracted scrutiny over its data-privacy policies. Khan Academy — which counted the managing partner of Gates' bgC3 think-tank and Google CEO Eric Schmidt as Board members in a recent tax filing — just struck an exclusive partnership with CollegeBoard to prepare students for the redesigned SAT."

+ - The Ethical Dilemmas Today's Programmers Face

Submitted by snydeq
snydeq (1272828) writes "As software takes over more of our lives, the ethical ramifications of decisions made by programmers only become greater. Unfortunately, the tech world has always been long on power and short on thinking about the long-reaching effects of this power. More troubling: While ethics courses have become a staple of physical-world engineering degrees, they remain a begrudging anomaly in computer science pedagogy. Now that our code is in refrigerators, thermostats, smoke alarms, and more, the wrong moves, a lack of foresight, or downright dubious decision-making can haunt humanity everywhere it goes. Peter Wayner offers a look at just a few of the ethical quandaries confronting developers every day. 'Consider this less of a guidebook for making your decisions and more of a starting point for the kind of ethical contemplation we should be doing as a daily part of our jobs.'"

+ - Problems with Windows XP caused by Microsoft.

Submitted by Futurepower(R)
Futurepower(R) (558542) writes "We are seeing 4 kinds of problems with Windows XP today at 2 remote locations:

1) One kind of problem is similar to the one in this April 7, 2014 story about computers in Australia: Pop-ups irritate Windows XP's remaining users. Microsoft Security Essentials on computers in the United States give pop-up messages about the MSE service being stopped.

2) Computers are requiring far longer to start, perhaps 12 to 15 minutes. Then the MSE pop-up appears.

3) Microsoft Security Essentials now calls into question whether XP is genuine. These are all computers that have run without issues for several years. The customer bought licenses when Windows XP was first released.

4) We have seen problems with the Windows XP operating system detecting a key stuck down when no keys were pressed on the keyboard. That is a software problem, not a keyboard hardware problem. It causes the system to be un-responsive because the key being detected is not one actually pressed, but is actually a key combination. Again, that is happening on computers that have been trouble-free for years. That problem began happening after a Windows update.

Microsoft said it would support MSE on Windows XP for another year. See the Microsoft article, Microsoft antimalware support for Windows XP. Apparently that support is not happening in the normal way."

+ - Turkey's Attempt to Block Tor Failing Due to Multiple Mirrors->

Submitted by DavidGilbert99
DavidGilbert99 (2607235) writes "Turkey's prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has already block Twitter and YouTube. Now, after Turkish people flocked to anonymous browser Tor, he is trying to block that too. However the Tor project has multiple mirrors, including one operated by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which are still accessible in Turkey, making the block on the official site a bit pointless."
Link to Original Source

+ - Are the backdoors to flash memory reserve pools? 1

Submitted by hormiga
hormiga (600498) writes "Because flash memory has a relatively limited number of program/erase cycles before failure, wear leveling mechanisms are often employed. These mechanisms sometimes use a pool of reserve blocks, managed by the controller, invisible to the user. There seem to be two consequences of this: (1) erasure is problematic, because the supposedly erased data might be hidden in the reserve pool, and (2) it might be possible to develop a "flash unerase" to recover some portions of accidentally deleted files. The implications for forensics, security, and simple convenience appear obvious.

This line of thinking was prompted by the unintended erasure of a Verbatim USB memory stick, occasioned by a laptop hardware accident. The drive was simply zeroed by the accident, but I suspect from the quickness of the incident that there was not time for the laptop to write zeroes to the memory stick: there may have been activation of a special command channel to the controller. I would like to recover the contents of that device.

I would like to develop a library and utility for the recovery of hidden data from the reserve pool, and for the secure erasure of files and interstitial gaps in the file systems of flash drives, especially for devices such as USB memory sticks. However, I'm not having much success discovering the interfaces available to software. Are there special backdoors or handshakes to access the reserve pools or other features in the flash controllers? Where is this information available?

Naturally, the results and code will be published as FLOSS."

+ - ATM malware, controlled by a text message, spews cash-> 1

Submitted by netbuzz
netbuzz (955038) writes "Cybercriminals are able to get cash from a certain type of ATM by sending a text message. The tactic is being reported by security vendor Symantec, which has periodically written about a type of malicious software it calls "Ploutus" that first appeared in Mexico. The malware is engineered to plunder a certain type of standalone ATM, which Symantec has not identified. The company obtained one of the ATMs to carry out a test of how Ploutus works, but it doesn't show a brand name."
Link to Original Source

+ - Adam Carolla Joins Fight Against Patent Troll 1

Submitted by tor528
tor528 (896250) writes "Patent troll Personal Audio has sued top podcasters including Adam Carolla and HowStuffWorks, claiming that they own the patent for delivery of episodic content over the Internet. Adam Carolla is fighting back and has started a Fund Anything campaign to cover legal fees. From the Fund Anything campaign page: "If Adam Carolla loses this battle, then every other Podcast will be quickly shut down. Why? Because Patent Trolls like Personal Audio would use a victory over Carolla as leverage to extort money from every other Podcast.. As you probably know, Podcasts are inherently small, owner-operated businesses that do not have the financial resources to fight off this type of an assault. Therefore, Podcasts as we know them today would cease to exist."

James Logan of Personal Audio answered Slashdotters' questions in June 2013.
Links to the patent in question can be found on Personal Audio's website.
The EFF filed a challenge against Personal Audio's podcasting patent in October 2013."

+ - Lego robot solves Rubik's Cube puzzle in 3.253 seconds->

Submitted by SternisheFan
SternisheFan (2529412) writes "For further proof the robot apocalypse is nigh, CTV News reports...

The Cubestormer 3 took 18 months to build but only needed 3.253 seconds to solve the puzzle, breaking the existing record.

Unveiled at the Big Bang Fair in Birmingham, U.K., the Cubestormer 3 is constructed from the modular children's building-block toy but uses a Samsung Galaxy SIV smartphone with a special ARM chip addition as its brain. It analyzes the muddled up Rubik's Cube and powers each of the robot's four ‘hands', which spin the cube until all sides are in order.

Created by ARM engineer David Gilday and Securi-Plex security systems engineer Mike Dobson, Cubestormer 3's new record shaves just over two seconds off the existing record, set by Cubestormer 2, which the pair also built.

"We knew Cubestormer 3 had the potential to beat the existing record but with the robot performing physical operations quicker than the human eye can see there's always an element of risk," said Gilday. "In the end, the hours we spent perfecting the robot and ensuring its motor and intelligence functions were properly synchronized paid off. Our big challenge now is working out if it's possible to make it go even faster.""

Link to Original Source

+ - Why Firefox -- yes, Firefox -- will become the mobile OS to beat->

Submitted by mattydread23
mattydread23 (2793761) writes "It's geared toward low-powered hardware in a way that Google doesn't care as much about with Android, it's cheap enough for the pre-paid phones that are much more common than post-paid in developing countries, and most important, there are still 3.5 billion people in the world who have feature phones and for whom this will be an amazing upgrade."
Link to Original Source

+ - It's the End of (XP) Support as we Know It->

Submitted by X!0mbarg
X!0mbarg (470366) writes "We've all heard about the inevitability of it, but M$ has started sending out Downloaded Notifications of its End Of Support for Windows XP as part of Automatic Updates. Has anyone else seen these pop up on their XP systems? I certainly did.

(Apologies in advance for my poor code-fu here.)


Many links abound for reference here:
  • http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/end-support-help?locale=ja-jp
  • http://windows.microsoft.com/en-ca/windows/lifecycle
  • http://www.scmagazine.com/pop-ups-to-signal-the-coming-end-of-windows-xp-support/article/336777/
  • http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2014/03/windows-xp-will-now-notify-you-that-its-dying/
  • and the Google-it-for-you reference: https://www.google.ca/search?q=WinXP+End+Of+Support+Notice&num=100&source=univ&tbm=nws&tbo=u&sa=X&ei=mLoYU-7WJ4nTqgHEjoGgCw&ved=0CE4QqAI&biw=1173&bih=750

Anyone else see this as an attempt to scare users into upgrades directly from the desktop?

Yes, we all knew this day would be upon us, but surely we didn't see M$ being so downright aggressive, did we?

Ultimately, what is everyone's opinion on this effort and its' ultimate affect to their usage of the admittedly antiquated OS?

I for one, will still be chugging along on a few systems until the system finally just Dies on me.

Any theories on actual support and afterlife cycle predictions? Anyone still patching together their Win98 systems? Win3.11? What duties have they been relegated to and why? What plans does everyone have in the Upgrade department? Are you waiting for anything specific from M$ before taking the Win8.1 plunge, or planning on holding onto your Win7 systems 'till they pry the code from its cold, dead drive?"

Link to Original Source

+ - One of the Most Alarming Internet Proposals I've Ever Seen->

Submitted by Lauren Weinstein
Lauren Weinstein (828974) writes "You'd think that with so many concerns these days about whether the likes of AT&T, Verizon, and other telecom companies can be trusted not to turn our data over to third parties whom we haven't authorized, that a plan to formalize a mechanism for ISP and other "man-in-the-middle" snooping would be laughed off the Net.

But apparently the authors of IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) Internet-Draft "Explicit Trusted Proxy in HTTP/2.0" (14 Feb 2014) haven't gotten the message.

What they propose for the new HTTP/2.0 protocol is nothing short of officially sanctioned snooping."

Link to Original Source

+ - Irony: Google's CIO doesn't let employees use "consumer-grade" cloud services->

Submitted by mattydread23
mattydread23 (2793761) writes "This takes the cake. In an interview with AllThingsD this weekend, Google CIO Ben Fried explained that he "can't let employees mess around with consumer-grade technology" and that he won't let employees use Dropbox because "when your users use it in a corporate context, your corporate data is being held in someone else’s data center." This from the CIO of the company that has done more to push consumer-grade cloud services into the enterprise than anybody else. Apparently it's "do as we say, not as we do.""
Link to Original Source

The trouble with the rat-race is that even if you win, you're still a rat. -- Lily Tomlin

Working...