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Comment: Re:Capitalism does not reward morality (Score 1) 191

by mvdwege (#48425297) Attached to: Is a Moral Compass a Hindrance Or a Help For Startups?

You specified the 19th century US economy as ideal. Since westward expansion was a large driver of that, you don't get to shift the goalposts: your ideal economy was built on force of arms.

Of course you try to shift the attention to my slavery quip, because that draws attention away from the real meat.

Comment: Re:Capitalism does not reward morality (Score 1) 191

by mvdwege (#48424253) Attached to: Is a Moral Compass a Hindrance Or a Help For Startups?

My 'beloved' free market created the USA economy of 19th century

Wait, that economy that was based upon forcibly (as in, using Armed Forces) taking land from the natives and the government redistributing it to settlers in the form of land grants? That 19th century USA economy?

Or do you mean the other one, built on trade in goods farmed by slaves?

Comment: Re:Go back in time 5 years (Score 1) 525

by mvdwege (#48424189) Attached to: Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

Yes, but as GP proves, the haters don't want to make any effort to understand systemd, because that would mean they would actually have to put some effort into maintaining their systems.

Putting badly-founded rants on the Internet just looks more impressive to a certain mind.

And to be fair, when I read about the boot-time mount behaviour of systemd, my first thought was "WTF?". I understand the logic, so I can live with it, but ideal it is not, IMO.

Comment: Re:Go back in time 5 years (Score 1) 525

by mvdwege (#48419565) Attached to: Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

It would help if you stuck to the facts, instead of selling more BS, like all the other anti-systemd merchants.

Mount works the way it always does, it does not invoke systemd. Automatic mounting at boot and on other system events is handled by systemd, but the mount command is what it always has been.

Again, another hater shows that they haven't even done the barest minimal testing on systemd to see what it actually does.

Comment: Re:Go back in time 5 years (Score 1) 525

by mvdwege (#48419523) Attached to: Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

In the old days, sysadmins read the documentation of a package before they installed it, instead of just blithely installing everything and then complaining that it doesn't work as expected.

Here's s a tip, junior: if you're on a system where you'd expect to have a mostly static resolv.conf, you don't install resolvconf. The use case for resolvconf is machines that change networks rapidly, such as laptops.

Next time, RTFM before you complain on the Internet and make a fool of yourself in passing.

Comment: Re:I use Uber over public transit (Score 2) 237

by mvdwege (#48383991) Attached to: Will Lyft and Uber's Shared-Ride Service Hurt Public Transit?

For $3 more I get dropped off in front of my office, they pick me up on my schedule, I get a real seat belt, appropriate heating/A/C, listen to NPR, nobody asking for money or sitting next to someone not having showered for a week etc etc.

Oh yes, God forbid you little princesses should ever see the masses up close

Just remember what happened to Marie-Antoinette.

Comment: Re:Gnome3, systemd etc. (Score 2) 447

by mvdwege (#48345791) Attached to: Joey Hess Resigns From Debian

No. Systemd supporters give plenty of technical reasons for their support. In my case (for one thing) it is wanting event based processing of service management. Systemd offers that, sysV rc doesn't. Like it or not, that's a technical reason.

On the other hand, you anti guys keep bringing up things like this shit, or 'not Unix philosophy', or 'monolithic hairball'. Those are not technical arguments.

Do me a favour, and refrain from answering until you can actually muster a technical argument against systemd.

Comment: Re:Speed (Score 1) 928

by mvdwege (#48345747) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

Once again you just disregard already given information. I summarized the bug and the related posts, but since you are going to whine regardless, I'll have Jonathan Corbet of LWN do the honours.

His article has all the links, to the bug and the related discussion. Of course you are going to cherry pick single posts again, but at least the peanut gallery will get to see who is being disingenuous here.

And this is my last word in this entire discussion. I have nothing to prove; you just have to show that you can do more than cherry pick to justify your irrational hatreds.

Comment: Re:Speed (Score 1) 928

by mvdwege (#48344943) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

No. The discussion of Kay Siever's undiplomatic initial handling of the bug split off from the main thread. Kay has been put under supervision of Greg KH, and that was it.

After that, the kernel devs and the systemd devs produced a solution.

Again, you're cherry-picking posts to support your worldview, disregarding all else, and projecting your dishonesty on others. As I said: Liar.

Comment: Re:Speed (Score 1) 928

by mvdwege (#48344683) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

No, you did not refute my claim. You ignored the entire bug, focusing just on Lennart's final conclusion. That's cherry picking.

Seeing as that the bug report, the LKML and systemd mailing lists came up with a full solution of the bug, you are a liar if you say that the systemd devs don't fix bugs.

Here's the full solution: using the generic 'debug' parameter of the kernel command line to turn on systemd debugging is the correct way to use that parameter, as stated by Linus himself. What is incorrect is generating too much logging for the kernel message buffer; this problem is fixed by fixing the original assert bug in systemd, and by Lennart's design decision to defer as much logging as possible until userspace is up.

It's all there in the bug and related discussion. You refuted nothing. You are a liar. And an Internet blowhard, a keyboard warrior.

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts." -- Bertrand Russell

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