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Comment: One of these days (Score 1) 79 79

One of these days I'll have to get "into" QT. It looks like a great successor to some of the concepts originating with Neuron Data's tools, which I spent a lot of years learning and working with. For now I've been focused on Java server code, but I've never really been a fan of Java for writing client applications, and I've no interest in buying an Android device just so I can stick with Java while working on front-end code.

No, to me, client side means an actual computer, not a mobile device. And QT hits almost as many platforms as Java does, so it would seem to be an excellent fit for my goals. :)

NASA

NASA To Waste $150 Million On SLS Engine That Will Be Used Once 138 138

schwit1 writes: NASA's safety panel has noticed that NASA's SLS program either plans to spend $150 million human-rating a rocket engine it will only use once, or will fly a manned mission without human-rating that engine.

"The Block 1 SLS is the 'basic model,' sporting a Delta Cryogenic Second Stage (DCSS), renamed the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion System (ICPS) for SLS. The current plan calls for this [interim] stage to be used on [the unmanned] Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1) and [manned] Exploration Mission -2 (EM-2), prior to moving to the [Exploration Upper Stage] — also to be built by Boeing — that will become the workhorse for SLS. However, using the [interim upper stage] on a crewed mission will require it to be human rated. It is likely NASA will also need to fly the [Exploration Upper Stage] on an unmanned mission to validate the new stage ahead of human missions. This has been presenting NASA with a headache for some time, although it took the recent ASAP meeting to finally confirm those concerns to the public."

NASA doesn't have the funds to human-rate it, and even if they get those funds, human-rating it will likely cause SLS's schedule to slip even more, something NASA fears because they expect the commercial manned ships to be flying sooner and with increasing capability. The contrast — a delayed and unflown and very expensive SLS vs a flying and inexpensive commercial effort — will not do SLS good politically. However, if they are going to insist (properly I think) that SpaceX and Boeing human-rate their capsules and rockets, then NASA is going to have to hold the SLS to the same standard.

Comment: Good idea (Score 4, Interesting) 107 107

Standards have a notorious habit of becoming bloated with rarely used features that never do get properly tested. Rethinking what is actually useful and needed is great for pruning code and handling the majority of use cases. Sure there will be edge cases it can't handle, but that's the whole point: they're edge cases that most programmers aren't going to need to use.

The Military

Test Pilot: the F-35 Can't Dogfight 805 805

schwit1 sends this report from the War Is Boring column: A test pilot has some very, very bad news about the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. The pricey new stealth jet can't turn or climb fast enough to hit an enemy plane during a dogfight or to dodge the enemy's own gunfire, the pilot reported following a day of mock air battles back in January. And to add insult to injury, the JSF flier discovered he couldn't even comfortably move his head inside the radar-evading jet's cramped cockpit. "The helmet was too large for the space inside the canopy to adequately see behind the aircraft." That allowed the F-16 to sneak up on him. The test pilot's report is the latest evidence of fundamental problems with the design of the F-35 — which, at a total program cost of more than a trillion dollars, is history's most expensive weapon. Your tax dollars at work.

Comment: Re:Depends of what you mean by "Use" (Score 1) 159 159

Linking GPL code is considered the same as copying in the source code. The library has to be released under the LGPL to be used by non-GPL source.

But you are correct about invoking canned binaries of GPL products or sending IPC messages to a GPL product, provided you're not using the GPL messaging libraries provided with the product, but rolling your own which happen to be compatible at the messaging layer. But I'm pretty sure your messaging code would have to be written in a different language as well in order to avoid any claims that you copied code from the GPL source.

Getting the job done is no excuse for not following the rules. Corollary: Following the rules will not get the job done.

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