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Comment: Re:More bullshit from you. (Score 1) 285

by lucm (#48256389) Attached to: The Airplane of the Future May Not Have Windows

I think you are just trolling, I can tell because your subject line is becoming more and more whiny, but if you are indeed interested in this topic get the latest summer issue of the Army Technology Magazine.

This is truly fascinating. The army tried for years to build those exoskeletal kits but field testing always came back with the same issue of soldiers removing their headgear under stress. So they switched to a new model that focus on augmented reality instead of VR. It's a simple helmet with a flip-top device that they can easily get out of the way as needed. Still full face but it's a transparent window and it works better for regular soldiers.

Some air force pilot have been using VR goggles for a while (like in those high-tech stealth choppers) but pilots are a different breed of people.

This is why I think the windowless plane cannot work. The visual contact with outside world is crucial when most people get nervous. Even if it's just the idea of being able to look outside, it's needed.

Comment: Re:As expected, you fail to answer the question (Score 1) 285

by lucm (#48254293) Attached to: The Airplane of the Future May Not Have Windows

No. This has nothing to do with citations (this is not wikipedia), this has to do with you being unable to understand the difference between full-face helmet worn by bikers and VR devices in suits like TALOS, even in the context of a discussion about windowless airplanes.

Comment: ask the military (Score 2) 285

by lucm (#48247663) Attached to: The Airplane of the Future May Not Have Windows

The US army has tried for years to come up with a full-face helmet with embedded HUD, built-in night vision, etc. On paper this is fantastic, but during field tests, soldiers consistently rip those off when they get into combat situations.

Put hundreds of people on a windowless plane, with 20% or more already scared at the idea of flying, and see what happens if the onboard computer crashes and they find themselves surrounded by blue (or black) screens. Cabin fever on steroids.

Comment: Re:Being different was a boat anchor. (Score 1) 296

by lucm (#48226025) Attached to: How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor

They're not really comparable.

I have a "comparable" PC laptop to my MBP. The screen and keyboard are worse, the battery life is 1/3,. and it came loaded with crapware. Does have a BR drive though.

Thank you for providing such detailed and reliable evidence. I stand corrected. PC bad, Apple good.

Comment: Re:Being different was a boat anchor. (Score 1) 296

by lucm (#48218315) Attached to: How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor

Right now, for the price of a Macbook Air you can get an Acer Aspire S7 with full hd and 8GB. That's the entry level one.

I'm not a fan of Acer, but that's the comparable and it has superior hardware specifications. So the only "disadvantage" that Apple avoided when they started to build PC clones is dealing with customers who don't joyfully bend over and pay for overpriced entry-level devices.

Comment: Re:Being different was a boat anchor. (Score -1, Troll) 296

by lucm (#48217617) Attached to: How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor

So they fixed their own bad design. That's hardly "taking the best of PC ecosystem, but avoided taking on the disadvantages".

The Macbook product line is terrible. Looking at these specifications, can you tell if this is the latest Macbook Air or an entry-level Acer laptop from 2011?

1440x900
128GB SSD
Dual-core i5 1.4 GHz
4GB DDR3
Intel HD 5000

A total joke.

Comment: Re:17GB of source code? (Score 1) 244

by lucm (#48198793) Attached to: Help ESR Stamp Out CVS and SVN In Our Lifetime

17GB of source code or history? In a single company? Nope.

The guys talks about SourceSafe, and I'd bet this 17GB repository is filled with tons of duplicated binaries. That's typical in Microsoft shops where people don't configure Visual Studio properly; each reference creates a copy of the relevant DLLs in the project's bin folder, and references to other projects bring a copy of that project's latest build but also all its DLL.

I have a client with that kind of setup. They have a bunch of related projects under source control; for a total of 200 files of source code, the size of the repository is over 700MB.

You can do this in a number of ways. IBM chose to do all of them. Why do you find that funny? -- D. Taylor, Computer Science 350

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