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Submission + - LEDs technology set to get cheaper, efficient->

hypnosec writes: One of the biggest hurdles in adoption of LED lighting is the cost involved and the inability of energy savings to offset these high costs. This is about to change as a new research has shown promise of a efficient yet cheaper LED technology. The new LED technology, which is said to have the potential of revolutionising lighting technology, has been developed by Zhibin Yu, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Florida State University. The new technology involves a combination of organic and inorganic materials. The newly developed material, which dissolve easily and can be applied like paint to light bulbs, shines a blue, green or red light. This is not its selling point though as what makes this technology special is the fact that it only requires one laying unlike traditional LED lights which require four or five layers of material on top of each other to create a product with desired effects.
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Submission + - Robotics industry reports: the inside info->

pRobotika writes: Covering a wide range of segments and the industry overall, we've reviewed fifty reports on the robotics sector this year. Ranging in price from $1500-$6000, these reports are costly but often valuable to VCs, companies, and academia. And they all forecast double-digit growth for most segments of the robotics industry through to 2019.
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Submission + - UNC scientists open source their genomic research->

ectoman writes: The human genome specifies more than 500 "kinases," enzymes that spur protein synthesis. Four hundred of them are still mysteries to us, even though knowledge about them could spark serious medical innovations. But scientists at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, have initiated an open source effort to map them all—research they think could pioneer a new generation of drug discovery. As members of the Structural Genomics Consortium, the chemical biologists are spearheading a worldwide community project. "We need a community to build a map of what kinases do in biology," one said. "It has to be a community-generated map to get the richness and detail we need to be able to move some of these kinases into drug facilities. But we're just doing the source code. Until someone puts the source code out there and makes it available to everybody, people won't have anything to modify."
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Submission + - Buzzwords Are Stifling Innovation in College Teaching->

jyosim writes: Tech marketers brag about the world-changing impact of "adaptive learning" and other products, but they all mean something different by the buzzword. Yet professors are notoriously skeptical of companies, and crave precise language. So the buzzwords are a major obstacle to improving teaching on campuses, since these tribes (professor and ed-tech vendors) must work together, an official from the US Dept of Ed told The Chronicle of Higher Education.
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Submission + - The Case for Teaching Ignorance

HughPickens.com writes: In the mid-1980s, a University of Arizona surgery professor, Marlys H. Witte, proposed teaching a class entitled “Introduction to Medical and Other Ignorance" because far too often, she believed, teachers fail to emphasize how much about a given topic is unknown. "Textbooks spend 8 to 10 pages on pancreatic cancer,” said Witte, “without ever telling the student that we just don’t know very much about it.” Now Jamie Holmes writes in the NYT that many scientific facts simply aren’t solid and immutable, but are instead destined to be vigorously challenged and revised by successive generations. According to Homes, presenting ignorance as less extensive than it is, knowledge as more solid and more stable, and discovery as neater also leads students to misunderstand the interplay between answers and questions.

IIn 2006, a Columbia University neuroscientist, Stuart J. Firestein, began teaching a course on scientific ignorance after realizing, to his horror, that many of his students might have believed that we understand nearly everything about the brain. "This crucial element in science was being left out for the students," says Firestein."The undone part of science that gets us into the lab early and keeps us there late, the thing that “turns your crank,” the very driving force of science, the exhilaration of the unknown, all this is missing from our classrooms. In short, we are failing to teach the ignorance, the most critical part of the whole operation." The time has come to “view ignorance as ‘regular’ rather than deviant,” argue sociologists Matthias Gross and Linsey McGoey. Our students will be more curious — and more intelligently so — if, in addition to facts, they were equipped with theories of ignorance as well as theories of knowledge.

Submission + - Updates Make Windows 7 and 8 Spy On You Like Windows 10-> 1

schwit1 writes: Windows 10 has been launched and already installed on more than 50 million computers worldwide. It is now a known fact that Windows 10 user data is being sent back to Microsoft servers back in Redmond, Washington. Well, now new updates that are being deployed to all Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 machines will turn their computers into a big piece of spyware, just like their predecessor, Windows 10.
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Submission + - FBI informant: Ray Bradbury's sci-fi written to induce communistic mass hysteria->

v3rgEz writes: The FBI followed Ray Bradbury's career very closely, in part because an informant warned them that his writing was not enjoyable fantasy, but rather tantamount to psychological warfare. "The general aim of these science fiction writers is to frighten the people into a state of paralysis or psychological incompetence bordering on hysteria," the informant warned. "Which would make it very possible to conduct a Third World War in which the American people would believe could not be won since their morale had seriously been destroyed."
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Submission + - Judge orders State Dept, FBI to expand probe on Clinton email server->

An anonymous reader writes: In a hearing over Freedom of Information Act requests to the State Department, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan said that former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton didn't comply with government policies. He ordered the State Department to reach out to the FBI to see if any relevant emails exist on Hillary Clinton's email server. Judge Sullivan was surprised that the State Department and FBI were not already communicating on the issue following the FBI's seizure of Clinton's email server and three thumb drives of emails. More than 300 emails are being examined for containing classified information, and dozens of the emails were "born classified" based on content. Some of those emails were forwarded outside the government. There are also clues emerging about how some of the classified information made its way onto Clinton's server. The email controversy is beginning to show up on the campaign trail, an unwelcome development for Secretary Clinton. Reporter Bob Woodward, who helped bring down President Nixon, said the scandal reminds him of the Nixon tapes. It is interesting to note that the post-Watergate reforms have helped move the investigation forward.
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Submission + - High-heeled hacker builds pen-test kit into skyscraper shoes->

mask.of.sanity writes: A Chinese hardware hacker has created a penetration testing toolkit built into high-heeled shoes to help social engineers slip hacking tools into secure areas. The WiFi-popping platforms were forged in a 3D printer and contain spacing so that hacking hardware can be hidden to bypass strict security checks in place at datacentres and the like and later retrieved.

Original imgur.com album source is somewhat NSFW.

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Submission + - New device with speedy treatment of Stroke results in improved outcomes->

jan_jes writes: In the treatment of stroke patients, time really is brain. A few minutes can mean the difference between patients living independently or suffering debilitating disabilities. Now, researchers have shown that speedy treatment with a new-generation stent clot retrieval device results in greatly improved outcomes, and that even a five-minute delay negatively affects patients. The one-year study found that when blood flow was restored to the brain within four hours of the start of a stroke, 80 percent of patients had a very good outcome — meaning that they survived and were able to live independently three months later.
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Submission + - Ubuntu Core gets support for Raspberry Pi 2 GPIO and I2C

An anonymous reader writes: Ubuntu Core is a tiny Ubuntu distribution aimed at the Internet of Things, using a new transactional packaging format called Snappy rather than the venerable Debian packaging format. It recently gained support for I2C and GPIO on the Raspberry Pi 2, and a quick demo is given here.

Submission + - MIT researchers discover "metabolic master switch" to control obesity->

ahbond writes: The meme of the chubby nerd alone in the basement may be a thing of the past. Well, at least the chubby part, if recent work at MIT pans out and we're able to use a biological 'master switch' to "dial-in" a persons metabolic rate.

"the uncovered cellular circuits may allow us to dial a metabolic master switch for both risk and non-risk individuals, as a means to counter environmental, lifestyle, or genetic contributors to obesity.”

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Submission + - Supercomputer Force Knocks Human Genome Assembly to Under 9 Minutes->

An anonymous reader writes: “For the first time, assembly throughput can exceed the capability of all the world’s sequencers, thus ushering in a new era of genome analysisThe combination of high performance sequencing and efficient de novo assembly is the basis for numerous bioinformatics transformations, including advancement of global food security and a new generation of personalized medicine.”
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Submission + - Home Robots Don't Yet Live Up the Hype->

moon_unit2 writes: You may have heard of "personal robots" such as Jibo, Buddy, and Pepper. One journalist recently met one of these home bots and found the reality less dazzling than the promotional videos. Whereas the Indiegogo clips of Buddy show the robot waking people up and helping with cooking, the current prototype can only perform a few canned tasks, and it struggles with natural language processing and vision. As the writer notes, the final version may be a lot more sophisticated, but it's hard to believe that real home helpers are just around the corner.
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They are called computers simply because computation is the only significant job that has so far been given to them.

Working...