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Comment: Re:First post... (Score 1) 29

by jellomizer (#49550241) Attached to: Patents Show Google Fi Was Envisioned Before the iPhone Was Released

Before the iPhone we were not primitives. They were smart phones years before the iPhone was released. The big players was Blackberry and a slew of windows mobile phones, and Palm. They had a keyboard you could browse the web you could even get apps, and watch videos. Android OS was in development. But the idea of smart phones were all centered around a full keyboard and some sort of pointing device. The key features where there. So it would make sense for Google to look for ways to improve bandwidth without the iPhone designed phone.

However after the iPhone was released it put the smart phone market in shock. It seemed that a larger screen was preferable, people picked up in using gestures quickly, and was willing to sacrifice a physical keyboard for it. This made all the other companies future plans obsolete thus giving Apple a two year lead.

But saying before the iPhone we wouldn't imagine trying to get faster mobile data is naive.

+ - Microsoft's K-12 CS and H-1B Visa Agenda: From Think Tank to Law of the Land

Submitted by theodp
theodp writes: Led by Steve Ballmer, Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, with corporate contributions from the likes of Microsoft and Google, a $30M campaign to promote K-12 computer science education was a smash success, winning over the President and lawmakers, who are poised to make CS a 'core academic subject' in a rewritten No Child Left Behind Act, which could result in hundreds of millions of dollars in new spending that the tech giants suggested could be funded using fees from additional H-1B visas they're coincidentally lobbying for to bring in foreign programming talent. Since the NY Times' Eric Lipton just won a 2015 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting that shed light on how foreign powers buy influence at think tanks, it probably bears mentioning that Microsoft's 'two-pronged' K-12 CS and H-1B visa agenda — which is on the verge of becoming the law of the land — was hatched at an influential Microsoft-backed think tank mentioned in Lipton's reporting, the Brookings Institution. On September 27, 2012, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings "hosted a forum on STEM education and immigration reforms and how these policy innovations can recharge American competitiveness and economic opportunity for current and future generations of workers." Keynote remarks were delivered by Brad Smith, executive VP and general counsel of Microsoft, who took the occasion to introduce Microsoft's National Talent Strategy. "So, Brad," asked the Brookings Institution's Darrell West, "you're the only [one] who mentioned this topic of making the problem bigger. So, we galvanize action by really producing a crisis ['like climate change', as Microsoft partner Code.org later put it], I take it?" Smith replied, "Yeah, I think we have the opportunity to do two things...the immigration and education issues are, to some degree, opposite sides of the same coin. The coin itself is about the need to have people with the right skills to do the work that the country needs to get done...And, you know, it will require additional people from outside the United States in the short term [20+ years, according to the WSJ] but let's use that to help address the broader and to some degree deeper and longer lasting problem that we face with respect to our educational system. It also gives us the opportunity to connect with people who may not have seen this connection or to connect with people who care more about one issue or the other, but bring them together" (video @ 49:24). Fittingly, in attendance two years later at the White House as President Obama tackled the national CS crisis as he 'learned to code' from a nonprofit headed by Smith's next-door-neighbor at the Brookings-trumpeted and nationally-covered Hour of Code event was Fred Humphries, a top Microsoft lobbyist and Brookings partner. According to visitor records, Humphries returned to the White House the next day with Smith and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella to quietly meet with officials. While in D.C., Nadella also lobbied for high-skilled immigration. And that, kids, is How a Bill [Gates Agenda] Becomes a Law!

Comment: Re:Fairly easy way to protect data. (Score 1) 75

What are you a yuppie from the 1980s or something!
For most cases unless the person was being malicious these problems happen due to a failure of the whole system not just one person.
The best of us probably had made a mistake or at lest was really close to one.
Human error is part of the game. If there is a problem you can act like adults and fix it, or act like kids and try to point to the person who can point any further.

Comment: Re:Fairly easy way to protect data. (Score 2) 75

All sounds good however... For a large organization such rules become impractical. To get full security there will be so much administrative overhead of approving access to a given area for so much time and back, that if you played by the rules you wouldn't get your job done timely. So you end up with "black market" IT where people will store backups of the data in say an access or excel files, and keep them hidden from the official system. Not because they have nefarious use of them, but because they will need to get their job done, and the official secure way is too impractical.

So let's say you were tasked to figure out if it was worth it it accept American Express, as AE charges a lot for its transaction. So you may need to figure out some numbers.
%of customers with AE
Average spending with AE
Average spending in total
Standard dev of spending with AE
Standard dev of spending total

Now because someone dropped the ball you will need this data quickly.
Putting a request to get this data may take days.

Comment: Re:Good (Score 4, Insightful) 99

by jellomizer (#49540199) Attached to: Bloomberg Report Suggests Comcast & Time Warner Merger Dead

The issue with the price, is your are paying for the Service and the Infrastructure.
I much rather have two bills.
One for the infrastructure, and one for the Service.
Much like in the old dialup days. We paid for the Phone Line, then we paid for the ISP.
We may have had limited options for the infrastructure, but you could choose ISP.

The problem is that We have both bundled together.

Comment: Sad no one mentioned the French TGV (Score 1) 189

by forged (#49525813) Attached to: Maglev Train Exceeds 600km/h For World Record
- Has been operating on conventional rail (cost $ vs. $$$ for maglev) since 1981.
- Is holding the world record of 574,8 km/h on conventioanl rail since 2007.
- Is linking all major cities in France and some abroad (Belgium, Germany, Netherlands, UK).
- Has commercial speeds of 280km/h for the oldest ones, to 320km/h for the current generation.
- Costs a fraction of the price of the maglev.

But, YMMV. And by all means go Japan !

Comment: Re:Well done! (Score 5, Funny) 536

<sarcasticly>But what about all those wealthy people, having low income houses will lower their property values and they will be less rich!</sarcasticly>

Part of the problem that we have is the physical separation of the Rich and Poor.
Poor people can learn a lot from rich people. As well rich people can learn some sympathy with the poor people and realize how much of their success was actually given to them, or by blind luck.

Comment: No, he's not (Score 3, Insightful) 190

by Sycraft-fu (#49509271) Attached to: Assange Talk Spurs UK Judges To Boycott Legal Conference

The UK handled everything per the law. They received an extradition request from a country they have a treaty with regarding this. They are required by the treaty to deal with these, they can't ignore them. So they reviewed it in court, to make sure it was a valid request per the treaty and decided it was. He appealed and the case moved up the chain until the high court heard it and decided that this extradition request is legitimate under the treaty, the UK has no standing to refuse.

Up until this point, Assanage was in no trouble in the UK, he hadn't broken UK law, they were just acting based on the extradition request. However then he fled. That is now a violation of UK law. He violated the conditions of his bail. That makes him a criminal in the UK. Skipping bail doesn't make you a "political prisoner" it makes you a standard criminal.

Comment: I don't think it is crappy (Score 1) 229

I mean it is a really, really minimal legit player base it could possibly effect. You would have to be someone who plays only F2P games, and has made so few in-game purchases that you haven't even spent $5. There are just extremely few people who are like that. Further, even people like that can still play, they just can't participate in some of the other Steam features. The games are still available to them.

Comment: Particularly since you can still play games (Score 1) 229

None of the restrictions are on buying or playing games. So even if you've never spent money (I'm not clear that retail doesn't count but let's say it doesn't) you can still play all the games you've got, and buy more games to play (at which point your account becomes unlocked). So you can do with it the main purpose: Play games, including free to play ones. It isn't like they are demanding money to unlock an account.

Also in the event this really was an issue for someone, they could just buy something cheap. I mean if you've dropped $50+ on a retail game it is not that big a deal to spend another $5 if it comes to that.

The best way to accelerate a Macintoy is at 9.8 meters per second per second.

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