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+ - Facebook Names New Security Chief->

wiredmikey writes: Yahoo! Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Alex Stamos said on Wednesday night that he will be leaving the iconic Internet company to take on the role of Chief Security Officer (CSO) at Facebook. Stamos took to Twitter and Facebook to announce the move, which comes just over a year after accepting his role of VP of Information Security and CISO at Yahoo in March 2014.

Stamos, who will officially join Facebook as CSO on Monday, June 29. He replaces former CSO Joe Sullivan who left the social media giant in April to take the role of CSO at Uber.

Stamos is a strong advocate of Internet privacy and security, and was a driving force behind TrustyCon, a rival event organized alongside the 2014 RSA Conference in protest of allegations that RSA accepted a $10 million payment from the NSA several years ago to use a weak number generating algorithm by default in its BSAFE toolkits.

Link to Original Source

Comment: Baidu Team's Apology Appended to Official Notice (Score 3, Insightful) 94 94

From the official announcement found in the NYT article (full of details we mostly already know) there comes an update with the team's response:

Message from the team in question:

Dear ILSVRC community,

Recently the ILSVRC organizers contacted the Heterogeneous Computing team to inform us that we exceeded the allowable number of weekly submissions to the ImageNet servers (~ 200 submissions during the lifespan of our project).

We apologize for this mistake and are continuing to review the results. We have added a note to our research paper, Deep Image: Scaling up Image Recognition, and will continue to provide relevant updates as we learn more.

We are staunch supporters of fairness and transparency in the ImageNet Challenge and are committed to the integrity of the scientific process.

Ren Wu – Baidu Heterogeneous Computing Team

So, while they deserve the year ban, the apology is nice. It's a shame we can never know what results a fair competition could have yielded ... and an even bigger shame that the media misreported Baidu as overpowering Google. I suppose the damage is done and the ILSVRC has made the right choice.

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding the classification problem but why isn't this run like most other classification problems (like Netflix and many other data challenges) where you get ~80% for training and the remaining 20% are held back for the final testing and scoring? Is the tagged data set too small to do this? Seems like wikimedia would contain a wealth of ripe public domain images for this purpose ...

Comment: Re:You're Talking About a Different Scale (Score 5, Insightful) 276 276

Frankly put, I'm unaware of "American organized political trolling" that rivals this.

Americans are quick to believe the Official Narrative, no matter how absurd. Mass media is the professional 'troll' that gets people to fight each here.

Again, you're conflating two things that are significant enough that I don't see a simple one-to-one comparison here.

The clear difference here is that the trolls in the article are a nebulous entity whereas the media trolls are not. I know to laugh at Glenn Beck and Katie Couric. I know who they are. I recognize their blubbering stupid talking heads. They're a trainwreck of lies and half truths. On the other hand, you can't stop google from returning search results that confirm what you're looking for. When it's a "trending hastag" on Twitter, you can't figure out if it's legit or not. How do I know that podonski432 on Twitter is the same individual on Youtube named ashirefort posting videos of an explosion is the same person retweeting podonski432 and adding ashirefort's video to their tweet?

Mass media doesn't employ subterfuge and I sure as hell can stop reading the New York Post & Washington Times & CNSNews & Huffington Post and all that other drivel. I can't, however, identify easily that this account on Twitter is just the new troll account that tricked me last time.

You do know that it's news if the New York Times is caught lying or spreading known falsities, right? I watched Jon Stewart hold a "reporters" feet to the WMD fire on one of his recent episodes. There's no self-policing mechanism like that among trolls.

Comment: You're Talking About a Different Scale (Score 5, Insightful) 276 276

It's just about time to drag the American organized political trolling on sites like reddit, twitter, and tumblr into the open too, right?

Well, astroturfing is no new tactic but ... I think what this article deals with is scale. 400 clearly skilled (bilingual at the least) individuals running multiple catfish personalities online day in and day out ... the whole thing on a budget of $400k a month? That level and size is probably unparalleled by ... say, Digg's conservative idiots.

You have one entity orchestrating the 12 hours a day work of 400 individuals on topics that are pro-Russian and tangentially pro-Russian. They are sophisticated enough to "hit play" at a certain time to unfold a natural disaster or assassination or anything to destabilize/confuse a region and they do so over many accounts on multiple social media platforms. They create video, screenshots, websites, etc. And they use proxies and sufficiently sophisticated means to appear to be disjoint at first glance.

They appear to have run an exercise on a rubber plant explosion in Louisiana for no other discernible purpose than to test out their new super powers or demonstrate their abilities to their customers/leaders.

Frankly put, I'm unaware of "American organized political trolling" that rivals this. This is paid. This is tightly controlled. This is prepared. This is unified. American organized political trolling is just a run-of-the-mill monkey shitfight with the occasional Koch Bros/Soros website (usually easily sourceable) thrown in.

Now if you can point me to a faked ISIS attack on American soil right before an election that was done by some political group stateside, I'd be interested to hear about it.

+ - Silk Road Creator Ross Ulbricht Gets Life in Prison->

wiredmikey writes: The mastermind behind criminal website Silk Road, which sold $200 million worth of drugs to customers worldwide, was sentenced to life in prison by a federal judge in New York Friday.

Judge Katherine Forrest imposed two life sentences against Ross Ulbricht, 31, for narcotics distribution and criminal enterprise.

Forrest told Ulbricht that he will never be eligible for parole. "What you did in Silk Road was terribly destructive to our social fabric," said the judge, calling him a criminal whose graduate school education made his actions less explicable than a common drug dealer.

Link to Original Source

+ - Jason Scott of textfiles.com Wants Your AOL & Shovelware CDs-> 1 1

eldavojohn writes: You've probably got a spindle in your close tor a drawer full of CD-ROM media mailed to you or delivered with some hardware that you put away "just in case" and now (ten years later) the case for actually using them is laughable. Well, a certain mentally ill individual named Jason Scott has a fever and the only cure is more AOL CDs. But his sickness doesn't stop there, "I also want all the CD-ROMs made by Walnut Creek CD-ROM. I want every shovelware disc that came out in the entire breadth of the CD-ROM era. I want every shareware floppy, while we’re talking. I want it all. The CD-ROM era is basically finite at this point. It’s over. The time when we’re going to use physical media as the primary transport for most data is done done done. Sure, there’s going to be distributions and use of CD-ROMs for some time to come, but the time when it all came that way and when it was in most cases the only method of distribution in the history books, now. And there were a specific amount of CD-ROMs made. There are directories and listings of many that were manufactured. I want to find those. I want to image them, and I want to put them up. I’m looking for stacks of CD-ROMs now. Stacks and stacks. AOL CDs and driver CDs and Shareware CDs and even hand-burned CDs of stuff you downloaded way back when. This is the time to strike." Who knows? His madness may end up being appreciated by younger generations!
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Won't save most of the 4000 lives (Score 1) 615 615

Let's say a truck is driving at 60 MPH (88 feet per second) when somebody jumps in front of it, 88 feet away.

If the speed limit on this road is 60 MPH, it most likely means that it is clear of stores, schools, etc., IOW this is not a standard city street. Braking is not the only option here, especially with a self driving truck. The truck could be programmed to safely sacrifice itself (running off the road into a field, river, etc.) to protect the humans around it.

It remains to be seen if this type of behavior from the automation will be mandated.

+ - ISIL Leader Abu Sayyaf Killed in Raid ->

wiredmikey writes: The White House on Saturday said that an ISIL senior leader known as Abu Sayyaf was killed in an operation in eastern Syria conducted by U.S. forces. Sayyaf, who was ordered to be captured, along with his wife Umm Sayyaf, was killed when he engaged U.S. forces, Secretary of Defense Ash Carter said in a statement.

According to the White House, Abu Sayyaf was a senior ISIL leader who, among other things, had a senior role in overseeing ISIL’s illicit oil and gas operations – a key source of revenue that enables the terrorist organization to carry out their brutal tactics and oppress thousands of innocent civilians. He was also involved with the group’s military operations.

Link to Original Source

Comment: No bias here. (Score 1) 103 103

In a series of party line votes, the House Science Committee has approved a number of changes to the laws that govern the private commercial space industry. Almost all of the changes were advocated by the [government], so in general they move to [improve] the regulatory and liability [common sense] that has been [enabling] the industry since the 2004 revisions to space law. While it is very unlikely commercial space can ever get [more] of [awesome] federal regulation, these changes indicate that they can eventually get some of the [most awesomest] regulations [strengthened].

I also, can write a really [unbiased] summary.

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