Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:What about the online use of these cards? (Score 1) 449

by A Friendly Troll (#49093589) Attached to: Credit Card Fraud Could Peak In 2015 As the US Moves To EMV

On an online credit card purchase you get a OTP token generated for that transaction? How is it implemented? Do you need to be logged in to your bank to have access to a generator or some kind of app on your phone?

It depends.

You can get a physical key fob, some new fancy credit cards include a small display and a keypad, or you can get a phone app to generate the token. All are PIN-protected.

Can't login to e-banking without a token, can't do anything inside it without a different token (called APPLI-2 here, whereas the OTP is APPLI-1).

Comment: Re:What about the online use of these cards? (Score 1) 449

by A Friendly Troll (#49085329) Attached to: Credit Card Fraud Could Peak In 2015 As the US Moves To EMV

My bank has an additional layer of security for when you purchase online. When you purchase with the credit card it spawns a page that comes from my bank. I gave it a personal statement that it uses to show that it is real - ie "Your wife's favourite food is potato chips" and then it asks for a password. If I give the correct password the transaction will go through.

Password?

Like, really?

Please don't tell me your bank account uses a password, instead of OTP tokens...?!

Jesus christ...

Comment: Send you sensitive information? (Score 1) 809

I should send you very sensitive information?

If I have it, and you don't, and it's very sensitive, then you'll have to supply me with a written and stamped document, signed by multiple Important People (tm), which states that it's okay to give you the data, and also specifies how I'm going to give you the data. I also need to be cleared from issues on your end. Maybe your network is hacked. The data is safe with me; how do I know it'll be safe with you? I need to be waived first.

Papers, please.

Comment: Re:DirectX is obsolete (Score 1) 135

"Europe" isn't just five countries, just as "Asia" isn't China and Japan only. India is having a really big WP surge, Brazil (listed above at 3.8% WP) too; carriers are currently pushing it like crazy, and if you were at the World Cup, you could have seen a lot of Lumias around, nowhere near what the data is suggesting. Their largest bank just released a WP app, due to a big uptick in WP sales. Similar in Argentina, if a couple friends are to be trusted - a lot of people are switching from low-end Androids to low-end Windows Phones.

The problem with various marketshare figures is that it often uses data from US services, mostly ad companies.

Comment: Re:DirectX is obsolete (Score 4, Interesting) 135

Sadly for them, Android beat them to the punch for "Affordable smartphone OS", while apple beat them to the punch for "Luxury smartphone OS". This leaves microsoft scrambling for marketshare in the smartphone space.

So what's going to happen when WP hits 30% in Asia and South America? It's on its way there. In several European countries, WP is at ~12-14%. Windows 10 is going to make central phone management easier; want to guess what's going to happen with tens of millions of various employees being issued official company phones?

WP is going to continue to grow, and iOS is going to continue to fall, until it becomes an irrelevant quirk.

Having a US-centric view on reality isn't a very good thing.

Comment: Re:No (Score 5, Informative) 570

by A Friendly Troll (#48867983) Attached to: Microsoft Reveals Windows 10 Will Be a Free Upgrade

No, absolutely not.

http://blogs.windows.com/blogg...

We announced that a free upgrade for Windows 10 will be made available to customers running Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows Phone 8.1 who upgrade in the first year after launch.*

This is more than a one-time upgrade: once a Windows device is upgraded to Windows 10, we will continue to keep it current for the supported lifetime of the device â" at no additional charge.

Microsoft is perfectly clear about this.

The article is wrong, the summary is wrong, and whoever decided to post something that links to Mashable's random interpretations should be fired.

Comment: Re:No (Score 1) 570

by A Friendly Troll (#48867885) Attached to: Microsoft Reveals Windows 10 Will Be a Free Upgrade

There are people using XP today, because it's "good enough" and "doesn't warrant spending money on an upgrade" - especially since the upgrade is Windows 8 with its stupid Metro UI.

With the return of the Start menu and general improvements, I can easily see a lot of Windows 7/8 users upgrading. I've just had a chat with a friend who insists that Windows 7 is the best ever (which I agree with), and she said she'll be upgrading to Windows 10, because it's free. 8 was a clusterfuck that had a price tag.

Don't underestimate the value of free :)

Comment: Re:No (Score 1) 570

by A Friendly Troll (#48867841) Attached to: Microsoft Reveals Windows 10 Will Be a Free Upgrade

I'm not a native English speaker :) Regardless of that, the quote is from "Pulp Fiction".

I'm not going to read a random article that someone pulled out of his ass, when major tech sites on the internet are maintaining actual live blogs, and Microsoft is happily streaming the event.

Don't read articles and random interpretations. There are actual quotes posted online, as well as photos of presentation slides.

To be a kind of moral Unix, he touched the hem of Nature's shift. -- Shelley

Working...