Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
IBM

IBM CIO Thinks Agile Development Might Save Company 208

Posted by samzenpus
from the best-laid-plans dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes: A new Wall Street Journal article details how IBM CIO Jeff Smith is trying to make Big Blue, which is going through some turbulent times as it attempts to transition from a hardware-dependent business to one that more fully embraces the cloud and services, operate more like a startup instead of a century-old colossus. His solution centers on having developers work in smaller teams, each of which embraces Agile methodology, as opposed to working in huge divisions on multi-year projects. In order to unite employees who might be geographically dispersed, IBM also has its groups leave open a Skype channel throughout the workday. Smith hopes, of course, that his plan will accelerate IBM's internal development, and make it more competitive against not only its tech-giant competition, but also the host of startups working in common fields such as artificial intelligence.
Android

Cyanogen Partners With Microsoft To Replace Google Apps 179

Posted by Soulskill
from the unexpected-alliances dept.
Unknown Lamer writes: Microsoft and Cyanogen Inc have announced a partnership to bring Microsoft applications to Cyanogen OS. "Under the partnership, Cyanogen will integrate and distribute Microsoft's consumer apps and services across core categories, including productivity, messaging, utilities, and cloud-based services. As part of this collaboration, Microsoft will create native integrations on Cyanogen OS, enabling a powerful new class of experiences." Ars Technica comments, "If Cyanogen really wants to ship a Googleless Android, it will need to provide alternatives to Google's services, and this Microsoft deal is a small start. Microsoft can provide alternatives for Search (Bing), Google Drive (OneDrive and Office), and Gmail (Outlook). The real missing pieces are alternatives to Google Play, Google Maps, and Google Play Services."

Rather than distribute more proprietary services, how about ownCloud for Drive, K-9 Mail for Gmail, OsmAnd for Maps, and F-Droid for an app store? Mozilla and DuckDuckGo provide Free Software search providers for Android, too. With Google neglecting the Android Open Source Project and Cyanogen partnering with Microsoft, the future for Free Software Android as anything but a shell for proprietary software looks bleak.
Technology

1980's Soviet Bloc Computing: Printers, Mice, and Cassette Decks 74

Posted by samzenpus
from the making-it-work dept.
szczys writes Martin Maly rode the wave of computer evolution in the 1980's while living in the former Czechoslovak Republic. Computers themselves were hard to come by, peripherals were even more rare and so enthusiasts of the time hacked their own, like dot-matrix printers and computer mice. If your build was impressive enough, the government would adopt it and begin manufacturing the design somewhat widely. Was your first computer mouse built into a plastic spice container? We covered what the personal computer revolution was like in Eastern Bloc countries back in December.

Comment: Check your sources? (Score 1) 174

Heck; off-the-shelf tech can see you through your walls.

If you actually read the article you linked, you could find out that it's custom made hardware made from components which may be used in a wi-fi device, that's not the same as off-the-shelf.
FTFA:

"All the components we use are ones typically used in a Wi-Fi handheld device," she said.

Wi-Vi transmits two Wi-Fi signals, one of which is the inverse of the other.

Off-the-shelf stuff can't do this, but with components similar to that you can.

Comment: Re:Seems like a terrible design (Score 1) 155

by feitingen (#44501665) Attached to: First Laptop With Full-Sized Solar Panels Will Run On Ubuntu
Let's work the numbers:

The screen is 13.3 WXGA, and the size is about 286mm x 179mm, and the panels appear to be the same size, and I can spot three.
Assuming a solar radiation of 1300 W per sqare meter and 15% solar panel efficiency, we arrive at a guesstimate of:
286mm * 179mm * 3 panels * 1300 W / square meter * 15% efficiency 30 W.

Looking at their website, it has a Intel Atom D2500 cpu which has a stated max TDP of 10 W, the hard drive could use 2-4 W (guesstimate), and the backlight could use from 1 to 10 watt (guesstimate), leaving still some power to charge the battery.

Now, back to the battery, assuming we get 90% efficiency when charging at 30W at 2 hours gives 54Wh.

Now, using this guesstimate of 13-24W should give from 4 to 9 hours use assuming the CPU is working at max TDP all the time.

To summarize, 2 hours solar charge in ideal conditions and (generously) assuming high quality solar cells (and a lot of other things) could give from 4 to 9 hours laptop use, possibly more.

Comment: Mildly annoying (Score 2) 359

by feitingen (#44068997) Attached to: My view of touchscreen laptops:
I have a touch screen laptop which appears like a normal laptop, so people don't know it's touch at first glance, and I usually forget to warn them. This leads to mildly annoying situations when I'm using it with someone. Someone: Hey, what's this? (touches screen) Hey, what happened? Me: You clicked on it. Now I either have to just click back in the browser, or rectify whatever they clicked on. Of course my screen is smudgy, but it seems a lot of people instinctively want to touch screens, so they are going to be smudgy anyways.
Programming

Ask Slashdot: Value of Website Design Tools vs. Hand Coding? 342

Posted by timothy
from the pre-built-motherboards-are-for-wimps dept.
An anonymous reader writes "I am pretty computer literate, and have a son who is extremely computer savvy. He taught himself C#, Javascript, built his own desktop with his Christmas and birthday money two years ago and is an avid reader of stackoverflow, reddit and many forums. He recently was asked to design a website for an architect, and likes to code by hand using Notepad++ and the Chrome developer tools. He uses CSS and Javascript libraries, but is convinced that all visual editors (Dreamweaver, Expression Web and so on) are only for extreme beginners and create non responsive, non compliant sites. I argue with him that while handcoding abilities are essential and great there is a value in knowing and using WYSIWYG editors. We agreed that having slashdot weigh in would be useful — comments appreciated on either the approach or good tools he can and should use."

Comment: Some are willing to take a pay cut to switch jobs (Score 2) 374

by zaunuz (#40611871) Attached to: To get me to switch jobs, it'd take ...

Around three months ago i found myself in a job that i hated - I spent 5 out of 10 weeks on the other side of the world, the pay was good, but not good enough to justify the frustration the job involved. I decided to leave, and my new job paid roughly ~30% less than my old one, and ever since i started i haven't regretted it for a second. In fact, i am currently on the clock, sitting in my couch at home, while my toddler son is playing with a SATA cable that belongs to him. I voted 50% pay increase, as that's what's closest to the 100% pay increase it'd cost my old employer for me to go back to them.

Open Source

What Do I Do About My Ex-Employer Stealing My Free Code? 545

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-a-meeting-with-the-bobs dept.
An anonymous reader writes "I recently found out that the company I used to work for is removing all the open source licenses (GPL and MIT) from my work, distributing it as proprietary software and taking all the credit despite the fact that they contributed nothing to it. They are even renaming it something really silly. What should I do?"
DRM

Ubisoft Brings Back Always-Connected DRM For Driver: San Francisco 261

Posted by Soulskill
from the back-by-popular-demand dept.
Last year Ubisoft introduced DRM for their PC games that required a constant internet connection, going so far as to terminate single-player games if the connection was interrupted. After facing outrage, boycotts, and DDoS attacks, Ubisoft seemed to have softened their stance, issuing a patch for two games that allowed offline play. Unfortunately, it seems the change wasn't permanent; Ubisoft's upcoming racing game Driver: San Francisco marks the return of the contentious DRM.

The perversity of nature is nowhere better demonstrated by the fact that, when exposed to the same atmosphere, bread becomes hard while crackers become soft.

Working...