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We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

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+ - Arduino Dispute reaches out to Distributors->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "Two companies are claiming ownership of the Arduino Trademark. The most recent development in this sad state of affairs is a letter from Arduino SRL to long-time Distributors of Arduino products. SRL is claiming they are the real Arduino, but there are some tasty tidbits including a Q/A section with some peculiar answers."
Link to Original Source

+ - Direct programming the sub-$5 ESP8266 WiFi module means Internet for everything->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "The ESP8266 boards have been around for a while. They let you add WiFi to any hardware project for under five bucks. But most people are using them with the AT commands firmware which is a bit of a kludge. Since espressif put out a free SDK for them, it's pretty easy to program them directly. Here's an overview of what that takes which really highlights how easy it is to do."
Link to Original Source

+ - There are two companies fighting to call themselves Arduino; here's what we know->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "Arduino is a household name in hobby electronics. But now there are two companies calling themselves Arduino and as you've probably guessed this is going to play out in the courts. How can this be? One company started the Arduino movement and used the other company, a contract manufacturer, to actually make the hardware. This went on for a few years before the trademark was actually granted. Elliot Williams did dome digging to help figure out how this all might shake out."
Link to Original Source

+ - Calling Hackers to Fix the World->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "The 2015 Hackaday Prize kicked off today. A Grand Prize of a Trip to Space in a prize pool worth $500,000 challenges hackers to build devices to solve real problems in the world. These are things like growing/transporting food, curbing pollution, providing health care, etc. New this year is the Best Product prize with offers $100,000 to the best design which is ready for manufacturing."
Link to Original Source

+ - One year of data proves the Hacker community is tight-knit and welcoming. ->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "The Hacker (sometimes called maker) movement holds sharing of ideas at its core. We are in the unique position to look at a huge data set from the last 365 day showing how people share their own work, and how they discover and interact with others. Check out these data visualizations which cover project topic distribution, views throughout year and by hour in the day, interactions between members of this community, and more."
Link to Original Source

+ - Why you should care about Software-Defined Radio->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "It has certainly gained some traction in the last few year, but I think most geeks still have little understanding about why Software-Define Radio is an important concept. It's already found in some consumer devices, and as more "Things" join the "Internet of" we're going to see more and more of it. So here's your crash course in what SDR is and why you should give it a try."
Link to Original Source

+ - Developer Saved Years Later by His Own Hardware->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "Would you do a better job designing hardware if your life depended on it? Chris Nefcy is in that exact position. Years ago he developed an Automatic External Defibrilator for First Medic. The device allows non-doctors to restart a human heart in the field. When Chris had a heart attack his ticker was restarted with shocks from his own hardware.

His story isn't just heartwarming, he also covers the path that led him into developing the AED and the bumpy road encountered getting the hardware to market."

Link to Original Source

+ - 80's Person Computing Behind the Iron Curtain: Western Clones plus Black Market-> 2

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "Obviously the person computer revolution was world-wide, but the Eastern Bloc countries had a story of PC evolution all their own. Martin Malý tells first hand of his experiences seeing Black Market imports, locally build clones of popular western machines, and all kinds of home-built equipment.

How do you build a 1980's computer around if 68000, 8080, and Z80 are all embargoed?"

Link to Original Source

+ - SatNOGS wins the 2014 Hackaday Prize for Satellite Networked Open Ground Station->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "SatNOGS have won the 2014 Hackaday Prize. The team of developers designed a satellite ground station which can be built with available tools, commodity parts, and modest skills. Data from each station can be shared via a networked protocol to benefit a much wider swath of humanity than one station could otherwise accomplish.

They have the option of a trip into space or $196.418"

Link to Original Source

+ - Open Source Offline Password Keeper Campaign Goes Live->

Submitted by themarmotte
themarmotte (3900555) writes "A little less than a year ago Slashdot featured the start of a world-wide collaboration around an open source offline password keeper, the Mooltipass. The device enumerates as a keyboard and uses a PIN-locked smartcard to read the AES-256 key required to decrypt its credentials database. All password accessing operations need to be approved on its physical user interface to prevent impersonation.
As its beta testing phase is over, the Mooltipass crowdfunding campaign is now live and already achieved 15% of its $100k goal in less than two days."

Link to Original Source

+ - Open Design. It is The Way.->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "Can you answer why we should push hardware companies to use Open Design? I can, and I think it's time we really start pushing for this as it benefits all end users and arguably benefits the engineers developing the hardware. I hope this philosophical rant with real world examples will win you over if you're skeptical."
Link to Original Source

+ - Net Neutrality: The Comcast/Netflix mess one method of teaching the FCC a lesson->

Submitted by szczys
szczys (3402149) writes "Rick Osgood did a really good job of explaining the finer points of throttling accusations between Comcast and Netflix. It's not hard to understand, but this actually gives details for tech savvy readers instead of the lowest common denominator.

The article closes by talking about a script written by Kyledrake. It detects FCC IP addresses and throttles them down to 28.8kbps speeds. Hi idea is that if enough websites were doing this it would send a message of throttling==bad to the people making the laws about net neutrality."

Link to Original Source

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