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Comment: Re:Life on Mars? (Score 2) 192

by Jeremi (#47420771) Attached to: Dubai's Climate-Controlled Dome City Is a Dystopia Waiting To Happen

No one will EVER live in a permanent space colony. Sorry.

While I share your pessimistic outlook for the foreseeable future, forever is a really long time. Are you willing to say that absolutely nobody will be living in a permanent space colony in 100 years? 500 years? 10,000 years? If so, what makes you so certain?

Comment: Re:translating for the athiests. (Score 1) 137

by swillden (#47416459) Attached to: Physicists Spot Potential Source of 'Oh-My-God' Particles

It amazes me that this needs to be pointed out. Using a deity's name in a secular and preferably angry context is one of the fundaments of swearing, by deus.

And one that is generally frowned upon by religious people. The names are essentially anti-religious, not religious, in nature.

Comment: Re:translating for the athiests. (Score 1) 137

by swillden (#47416141) Attached to: Physicists Spot Potential Source of 'Oh-My-God' Particles

other particles we find similar to it could be given normal names like UHE particles, or super high energy rays but that doesnt secure grant funding in the theocratic Mormon state of Utah.

If the state of Utah is theocratic and makes funding decisions based on particle names, choosing blasphemous ones is not the path to big research bucks. Mormons take the prohibition against taking the name of deity in vain pretty seriously.

Comment: Re:ridiculous (Score 2) 497

by Jeremi (#47415929) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

Experience and training is not very important as long as you know how to write good code that's efficient and makes sense to others.

And how did you learn to write good code that's efficient and make sense to others? Maybe you're the rare case of a person that can just intuit what is good code and what isn't, but I think most developers (including myself) learn how to write good code by first writing lots of bad code, and then suffering the consequences until they learn from experience what works and what doesn't.

Comment: Re:Cry Me A River (Score 4, Insightful) 497

by causality (#47415533) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

But the real problem is this impression that you have to be born 80% as smart as Einstein to get into this field, and that the learning curve is impossible for regular people. That's totally wrong. Average intelligence plus persistence is all you need.

What you really need is to deal with this anti-intellectualism that's so popular in the culture today, and replace it with genuine curiosity, a joy of discovery, and a delight at learning new things.

Do that, and the rest will naturally follow, and not just in software development.

Comment: Re:Not new (Score 1) 252

by swillden (#47412789) Attached to: US Tech Firms Recruiting High Schoolers (And Younger)

Most companies want degrees OR equivalent work experience.

Most, maybe. But there are a substantial number that do demand a degree, and the non-degreed will always have at least a small handicap, because given two otherwise equivalent candidates, the one with the degree is likely to get the job, and after 10 years or so the extra four years of experience aren't going to mean as much as the formal education.

In addition, if at some point in your career you want to move into another career track the degree may well become even more important -- though the choice of major may become much less important.

Comment: Re:It's already going on... (Score 1) 341

by swillden (#47411479) Attached to: Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies
They do comply with OBDII. Some of the bits are different, obviously. I have an OBDII scanner I use regularly with my LEAF. It extends the spec to allow reporting on some EV-only parameters, such as the state of each of the hundreds of cells in the battery, but it also reports lots of the same data reported by an ICE.

The IQ of the group is the lowest IQ of a member of the group divided by the number of people in the group.

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