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Comment: Re:Great product bloodlines (Score 1) 55

by PopeRatzo (#49185413) Attached to: A Versatile and Rugged MIDI Mini-Keyboard (Video)

The QuNexus also has control voltage outputs for directly triggering analog/modular gear.

That is great news. I've got a room full of old modular synths, like a Serge suitcase model and an early Arp.2600. Not to mention a Steiner-Parker that looks like it should have a 1930's phone operator sitting at it.

I've built some home-brew triggering controllers, but none of them are anywhere near as good as what McMillan makes.

Comment: Re:misleading headline (Score 1) 124

by Tom (#49183031) Attached to: Schneier: Either Everyone Is Cyber-secure Or No One Is

Those two missions aren't mutually exclusive. Defend yourself at home and go on offense abroad.

It works for bombs and tanks, but not for computer networks and communications. It might have even worked in the time of telegraphs and snail mail letters. But for encryption, it doesn't work. A cipher is either weak, or strong. You can compromise a foreign postal system without affecting the security of your own, but you can't secretly build a backdoor into an encryption algorithm that works only for you.

Simply asserting that something is mutually contradictory because it sounds good to use words like 'cognitive dissonance' isn't any kind of argument.

Now you're trying to reverse the chain of causality just to make a cute finishing sentence. :-)

Comment: Re:Pandora's Box (Score 1) 415

I had $15k worth of shit stolen and what did the L.A.County sheriff dept. tell me, even after I found some of my stuff at the neighbor's place? If I didn't have receipts I couldn't prove it was mine and so sad for me. But if I wanted to steal it back, go for it.

Curt, bravo for standing up against the bullies online, same as you would in real life.

Comment: misleading headline (Score 5, Insightful) 124

by Tom (#49178995) Attached to: Schneier: Either Everyone Is Cyber-secure Or No One Is

What's with the clickbait headlines? By itself, the headline is total BS. The actual statement made, however, is spot on. The hole in your security doesn't care who exploits it. There's no "good guy" flag in IP headers (though I'm sure some April 1st RFC will soon introduce it).

What worries me most is that we could win this fight, if it weren't for our own governments deciding to betray us. There are vastly more people interested in secure communication and other people not being able to spy on or subvert our computers and mobile devices than there are people interested in compromised communications and systems (basically only criminals and some deluded, criminal-if-the-laws-were-right elements of governments).

There is just one problem to Bruce's argument: The largest and most powerful spy agency in the world disagrees with his fundamental assumption. We often forget that the NSA has two missions, and they are exactly the two things that Bruce argues cannot co-exist: To secure the computing infrastructure of the US against foreign espionage, and to provide espionage on foreign communication.
The NSA believes, and/or is tasked with exactly these two things that Bruce says (and I agree) are mutually exclusive. No surprise they've gone rogue, their very mission statement is a recipe for a mental breakdown through cognitive dissonance.

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