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Comment: Re:Who will win? (Score 1) 94

Hardly. AirBnb and PayPal are both good examples of this sort of thing. PayPal got raided a lot and got sent C&D letters by various state regulators when they were rolling out across the USA. Eventually they had to sell to eBay (their primary competitor) to get enough money and political immunity to survive. There's a book about it called the PayPal Wars that goes into more detail on this.

Comment: Re:Systemd and Gnome3 == no thanks (Score 1) 98

by squiggleslash (#49611223) Attached to: Ubuntu 15.04 Received Well By Linux Community

Personally I wish no distro was set up to want you to use root... I have...less than fond... memories of torching everything in my Slackware systems by accident back when I used it in the late nineties.

After a temporary switch to Mac OS X in the early 2000s, I realized sudo was the way to go, and was very glad when I found modern distros reflected that.

Ubuntu isn't targeting people who need to feel like "teh lunix exparts".

Agree. It's actually aimed at a combination of newbies, and experienced *ix users. One should be protected from root at all costs. The other is experienced enough to know they should be too...

Comment: Re: Why is is the material support provision bad? (Score 1) 121

lol. This is an administration that defines the word "militant" as meaning any male that isn't a child or pensioner. "Material support for terrorism" doesn't mean anything at all, given that the last 15 years have shown governments will happily label anything they don't like as terrorism. Bear in mind the primary roadblock that prevents the UN agreeing on a definition of terrorism is western nations (i.e. America's) insistence that people who resist foreign occupation of their countries must be considered terrorists, and Arab nations insistence that they mustn't.

Comment: Re:Warmth? (Score 2) 261

FAR ÃÂ 91.211 Supplemental oxygen

(1) At cabin pressure altitudes above 12,500 feet (MSL) up to and including 14,000 feet (MSL) unless the required minimum flight crew is provided with and uses supplemental oxygen for that part of the flight at those altitudes that is of more than 30 minutes duration;

But hey, what does the FAA know about thin air and hypoxia.

Comment: Re:I WISH he was a candidate (Score 1) 373

by squiggleslash (#49603597) Attached to: Bernie Sanders, Presidential Candidate and H-1B Skeptic

Registered Democrats in many areas of Florida in 2000 (and to a certain extent today) are Dixiecrats, not people to the left of the editorial columns in the Washington Post. They tend to vote Republican for everything except local politics. They may vote for a Democratic Senator, Congressman, or State Governor, but only if the candidate is a Dixiecrat too.

Comment: Warmth? (Score 4, Informative) 261

Mehana Kihoi. ... âoeWhen you place your hands and your bare feet into the soil, you feel that warmth, you feel her heart."

Liar. Had you ever placed your hands and bare feet into the soil at 13,000 feet atop Mauna Kea you'd know that the only things you feel are hypothermia and hypoxia. It's friggin' cold up there, and the air is barely breathable.

Comment: I found it works on Slashdot (Score 4, Funny) 34

by squiggleslash (#49602121) Attached to: Researcher Bypasses Google Password Alert For Second Time

Surprisingly, with Chrome, if you enter your Google password in the Subject box of a new comment and then press the "Submit" button, the warning dialog comes up and your post won't get sent until you confirm it. Only discovered that because my Google password is (well, was) "systemd?".

Comment: Re:Motive (Score 3, Insightful) 185

Yeah I thought the summary's equation of "Protestors" and "Rioters" (headline uses the latter, main text the former, apparently referring to the same people - for the record, the number of protestors in Baltimore last week was some figure conservatively estimated in the tens of thousands; the number of rioters was less than 2,000 - probably much less, being made up largely of local gangs) was rather reflective of the kneejerk reaction against any politicial activity by "the masses" in this country.

The other day I mentioned the (thankfully debunked) neo-urban-legend about a nearby Florida sheriff saying it was OK to run over protestors if they get in your way to some people in the office. At least one was fully in favor, giving a whoop when he heard it.

I was brought up in the UK, moving to the US when I was 25. The idea of treating political protests as something horrific astounds me, it's normal activity over there, you'd expect it to be accepted and supported in the country that invented the first amendment. But apparently not.

Comment: Re:Leaping to assumptions (Score 1) 81

Psychologists who collaborate with torturers are ethically complicit

Absolutely, which is obviously something you and I agree upon completely.

Boycotting the torturers is the only ethical stance here

If it is (and it isn't) then ethics be damned. The only moral stance is to do whatever is in your power to prevent torture from happening. Standing idly and refusing to intervene by is utterly reprehensible, even if it's an ethical one according to some code of ethics I'm unfamiliar with.

Comment: Re:systemd? (Score 1) 52

by squiggleslash (#49599767) Attached to: Debian GNU/Hurd 2015 Released

Well in fairness some modern operating system components that ship with Debian, such as recent GNOMEs, are transitioning (or have transitioned) to having systemd as a dependency. Yeah, you can "just not use GNOME", but over time more and more of the operating system will transition that way.

And it kinda ignores why systemd exists. Over time, I'd expect Debian to make itself more systemd dependent, as doing so allows Debian to introduce long awaited security and stability improvements by allowing it to transparently use cgroups and run unprivileged daemons that can listen to privileged ports, things that are not practical under sysvinit (though might be under Upstart.)

What I'd like to see is Hurd to introduce the functionality that systemd is reliant upon so it too can be ported.

The more I want to get something done, the less I call it work. -- Richard Bach, "Illusions"

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