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Comment: Re:We had a distributed social network (Score 2) 232

by IamTheRealMike (#48215593) Attached to: We Need Distributed Social Networks More Than Ello

If you ignore the ability to restrict personal data to particular people, news feed with intelligent ranking that tries to guess who your real friends are so you don't have to upset people who post a lot by defriending them, the ability to tag people in photos, the lack of any need for meaningless URLs and a seamless way of organising events ...... then sure. Facebook is just like the web.

Comment: Re:Free aggregation? A problem? (Score 5, Insightful) 91

by squiggleslash (#48215447) Attached to: German Publishers Capitulate, Let Google Post News Snippets

20 years ago, you woke up in the morning, heard a "phhhpmp" at the front door, went over, saw the newspaper that you pay to get delivered every morning on your carpet under the letterbox, would grab it, take it to the table, make yourself breakfast, and then read. You'd read news from that newsppaer. That newspaper would take on the honored (or not so honored in some paper's cases) role and responsibility of guiding you through what's happening in the world. To that paper, that position was a relationship to be developed, nurtured, built upon. Your loyal readers would come back day after day, they'd actually subscribe.

Today, you visit a website on your tablet, phone, or PC, usually multiple times a day. Britney Spears' nosejob is a click away from your Twitter stream to the CNN website. An email comes in, and you, on the recommendation of your friend, reading a Huffington Post article about cats. Then you get another email from your mother, and you're on healthy-stuff.com reading about the seven fruits that might stop you getting cancer. Oh, and a person walks by your desk, and says "Did you hear? OMG you didn't? It's everywhere, terrorists just attacked the Dallas book depository, hundreds dead!", and where do you go?

Well, Google, You go to Google. You enter "dallas", and you already have a choice of articles to read, but you click on "More news about Dallas" and there are 50,000 breaking news articles about the incident at the book depository, including articles from news organizations you've never heard of, that are local to Dallas, whose views and coverage you'll respect for this one story... and then never visit again.

At no point have you ever said "You know, I'm going to get my news from the St Olaf Bugle, I'm looking forward to reading it tomorrow."

That is what they're afraid of. That's why several publishers are getting out of the newspaper business altogether, it's why Rupert Murdoch keeps doing stupid things like buying social media networks and starting enewspapers for tablets, and it's why German newspapers are not overly enthusiastic about having their work featured on Google News.

Comment: But disabling GSM when possible is still smart (Score 2) 26

by IamTheRealMike (#48207581) Attached to: Deutsche Telecom Upgrades T-Mobile 2G Encryption In US

GSM (2G) encryption did not authenticate the cell tower, whereas UMTS (3G) and above do. Cell tower authentication should break devices like the Stingray and other forms of fake base station, unless/until governments start forcing cell carriers to hand over the signing keys for tower identities. But as devices like Stingray exist more or less exclusively to get around the warrant requirement and no carrier would assist in that way without a court order, that places the police in the awkward position of asking a judge to write an order than can only be for avoiding the same judges authority....

Comment: Re:Congratulations, FTDI, You Just Killed Yourselv (Score 1) 665

by ewhac (#48207355) Attached to: FTDI Reportedly Bricking Devices Using Competitors' Chips.

The chips are not destroyed.

Yes, the bricked chips can (allegedly) be restored to working order through the use of a utility. "Hang on. Would this utility be furnished by the very same company that wrecked my device in the first place?" Why yes; is that relevant? "Very fscking hilarious; I'll be looking elsewhere for my USB-serial adapter needs from now on..."

This is a distinction without a difference, as they say. You wouldn't cut any slack to a malware author who tried to claim, "Oh, the files aren't destroyed. They're merely encrypted, and can be restored to their previous condition through the use of this handy-dandy decryption key, available exclusively from me... for a modest fee..."

Comment: Congratulations, FTDI, You Just Killed Yourselves (Score 3, Insightful) 665

by ewhac (#48206865) Attached to: FTDI Reportedly Bricking Devices Using Competitors' Chips.
Assuming FTDI manages to weasel out of lawsuits for willful destruction of property (do NOT let them hide behind the so-called EULA), they have basically made themselves the vendor to avoid for either chips or drivers for said chips.

Can you tell, by merely looking at it, whether a given device is using GenuineFTDI(TM)(R)(C)(BFD) chips, or whether it's a counterfeit? Can you tell by using whatever the Windows equivalent of lsusb is? No? Then there is a random, non-trivial chance that plugging in your serial-ish device will either:

  • Work (old non-destructive drivers),
  • Not work (new, non-destructive drivers),
  • Ruin the device (new, destructive drivers), so that it not only Not Works, but also Stops Working on every other machine on which it previously worked.
  • Thus, in the mind of the user, FTDI == Flaky. And Flaky == Avoid.

    Congratulations, FTDI. Ten points for avoiding your feet, but minus several million for shooting yourself straight in the head.

Comment: Re: Gamergate is NOT about defining "gamer" (Score 1) 164

by squiggleslash (#48202999) Attached to: For Game Developers, It's About the Labor of Love
As a postscript, a journalist who did something similar to what I did, writes here about his experience. Again, if you (as seems increasingly unlikely) really are concerned about corruption in journalism, you should probably stop telling people who ask for examples to go off and do their own research.

+ - China performing SSL MITM attacks on iCloud

Submitted by IamTheRealMike
IamTheRealMike (537420) writes "Anti-censorship blog GreatFire has published a story claiming that SSL connections from inside China to Apple iCloud are being subject to a man in the middle attack, using a self signed certificate. Apple has published a knowledge base article stating that the attacks are indeed occurring, with example screenshots of the SSL cert error screens used by popular Mac browsers. Unfortunately, in China at least one natively produced browser called Qihoo markets itself as "secure", but does not show any certificate errors when presented with the self signed cert. Is this the next step towards China doing systematic SSL MITM attacks, thus forcing their population onto Chinese browsers that allow the surveillance and censorship to occur?"

Comment: Re:I never ever commented on the SCO issue in any (Score 1) 187

We knew what was going on when you ran your anti-IBM campaign, sometimes even positioning yourself as arguing on behalf of our community. It was a way to lend credence to IBM and MS arguments during the SCO issue. To state otherwise is deceptive, perhaps even self-deceptive.

Florian, you would not be devoting all of this text to explaining yourself if you didn't feel the need to paint your actions in a positive light. That comes from guilt, whether you admit it to yourself or not.

Go write your app, and if you actually get to make any money with it you can give thanks, because it will happen despite what you worked for previously. Keep a low profile otherwise because your credibility is well and truly blown and you can only make things worse. And maybe someday you can really move past this part of your life. But I am not holding out much hope.

Comment: Re:Systematic bias, but also something else (Score 1) 755

by squiggleslash (#48199015) Attached to: NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

I'm in the same boat as he is, and I know what he means.

It's not about denying access to ponies or princesses. It's about (1) not assuming an interest or lack of interest (relatively easy - my daughter seems just as fond of Cookie Monster and Thomas the Tank Engine as Abby and Madeline) and (2) not accidentally dropping the social cues that lead girls to see certain things as important in a way boys wouldn't.

It's very, very, hard, for example, for a dad not to tell my daughter how beautiful she is. But imagine, however, the effect it has on you if people around you, from the day you're born, talk about how pretty and beautiful you are. I never had that, because I'm male. My mother called me handsome from time to time, but it was never drilled into me that beauty was so important.

If she wants to consider it important, let her determine that herself.

Comment: Re:Can we stop trying to come up with a reason? (Score 1) 755

by squiggleslash (#48198935) Attached to: NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

FWIW my experience of women as part of development teams has been largely positive, with one exception (not the woman herself, though she was fairly fiesty which in this case didn't help - or maybe it protected her, I don't know, but her supervisor, who was an out and out misogynist. She eventually left, because the company we worked for at the time kinda sucked like that.) That is, respect amongst male programmers for female programmers seem to be completely in line with what you'd expect for males respecting males.

Now, that said, I can't speak as a female in the same situation, so while the degree of respect might have been entirely reasonable, other factors may creep in that, as a male, I'm unaware of.

All I can say is as the father of a 2yo girl myself, I'm desperately hoping she has whatever opportunities she wants when she grows up. I think we in software development is decent enough that it's a field I'd have no trouble recommending to her. But, obviously, in the end it all depends on the group you end up working for.

Comment: Re:Like everything else, it depends ... (Score 1) 14

by squiggleslash (#48198495) Attached to: On posting anonymously

It's a real shame that you have to add all the disclaimers, and highlights the problems that we need anonymity for.

Yeah, though in the end... I was in part trying to keep a cool head with the disclaimers, but after a few days of research I must admit to being sufficiently unimpressed by the GG crowd, having shown it for the last few days just trying to get some straight answers, that I doubt being anonymous actually makes any difference. Ultimately it's hard to hide the fact you're the one with those opinions, unless you never say anything.

Ms. Barbara Hudson, 1312 rue Hyman, # 301, ...

I think you have a number of things going for you:

1. You know where APK lives too.
2. You live in a completely different country. ;-)

I'm glad we're maybe closer in views about the reaction of many towards Twitter death threats.

Comment: Re: Gamergate is NOT about defining "gamer" (Score 1) 164

by squiggleslash (#48198379) Attached to: For Game Developers, It's About the Labor of Love

There was an article on Slashdot about something GamerGate did that was going against the very journalists you're claiming GamerGate is ignoring. Slashcode even helpfully linked to it as a related story. It's right there at the top. The only way you missed it is if you're willfully ignoring it, which of course you are.

Not on my version of the page, no. The only link GamerGate related in the related stories list at least as rendered here is the Intel/Gamasutra/"Gamers" are dead thing (which I assume you cannot possibly mean, as it doesn't involve unethical journalism.)

FWIW, I also did your job for you. "My job?" I pretend to hear you ask. Well, yes. You're an advocate for a movement, and so the onus is on you to push forward examples of what you're fighting against, something you're refusing to do on principle.

So I trawled through a bunch of GamerGate Twitter streams, including Nero's. I looked at the Reddit KotakuInAction subreddit, which appears to be an organizing grounds for GamerGate. I looked at the negative responses to people like thequinnconspiracy and followed the links they were claiming.

And during this time, I found... zero cases. Well, let me back up a moment: there was one, involving Gawker, that was obviously a case of unethical journalism, with a journalist, as a joke, taking on a pro-bullying-nerds position, and GG rallying the troops against them. But I'm not counting it basically because it was a response to GG. The Gawker idiot would never have made the joke if there wasn't some giant group he thought represented nerds running around being apparently nasty and evil.

But in terms of independent cases of journalistic corruption? As in EA offers to swamp SuperGamerMagazine.comnetorg with expensive ads in response to good reviews for The Sims 4? As in BioWare gives Slimy McSlimepants from AGN his own Asari sex doll in exchange for a great review of Mass Effect 7?

No. Not one example. Nothing.

What I did see was primarily articles about how terrible the meida was because they're lying about GamerGate. Not lying about video games, but GamerGate.

I also saw some fake conspiracies. Yep, fake. I mean so fake it should have been obvious to everyone commenting. Like an email "leaked" from The Guardian that the "leaker" claimed contained an attack on GamerGate. Except it didn't. It contained an attack on people using the #killallmen hashtag. It was right there in the subject line. The leaker hoped that people would take a sentence that occured after the attack on #killallmen users, saying that a prominent feminist would be in the office to discuss GamerGate the next day, as meaning that the attack was about GamerGate.

Add that to the attacks on Quinn for having intimate relations with a journalist... which turned out to also be a fake conspiracy because said journalist wrote nothing about her, absolutely nothing, after the relationship started.

Add to that the attacks on Gamasutra for writing an article attacking gamers... except it didn't, it attacked the industry for only writing games aimed at "gamers" (the quotes are important, and yes, they appeared in the article), that is, a demographic of white immature teenage males that no longer makes up even a plurality of gamers. Oh, and even if it had attacked gamers... corruption? Really?

Well anyway, I'm seeing a pattern here.

Does the pattern matter? Well, probably not. In the end, the Guardian, and Gamasutra, and Quinn issues were probably peripheral, a movement desperately trying to find a positive identity when it knows there's considerable darkness holding it together. Quinn was attacked, not the journalist she had a relationship with. The death of "Gamers" article was written by a self-avowed feminist but wasn't radically different from criticism published elsewhere. The attacks on another feminist for publishing videos reviewing games from a feminist analytical point of view. The attacks on a female game developer including doxxing, her account being hacked, and a full on campaign of slander, because she documented some of the sexism she was dealing with in the industry.

And... well, we add to that SJWs. I don't mean the people, I mean the insult. The fact that GamerGate's opponents - by GamerGate's choice - are not journalists, but those who promote equality and inclusiveness and who oppose mindless sexism.

I did your job. I went out to try to find out what you were about. I did this after giving you the opportunity countless times to give examples showing GamerGate's good side, but you kept telling me to go off and do it myself. So I did. I think, based upon GamerGate's own words, that the group is primarily anti-women. The journalism thing is a smokescreen, I think in part because the GGs themselves are uncomfortable with the movement being solely about harassing female developers and developers who think about gender issues, it needed some underlying moral purpose otherwise it's just a bunch of nerds bullying women.

I'd say maybe it was a mistake not to engage me with examples of GamerGate challenging actual corrupt journalism, but I'm thinking you never had any.

Pro-tip: if I got it wrong, if you're really about corrupt journalism, then next time someone comes to you and says "I keep hearing conflicting things about GamerGate. I hear you guys are saying it's about unethical journalism, do you have anything about that?", you give them an example. Do NOT, under any circumstances, tell them to go off and search the Internet. Because they will not agree with you after they do.

As for me and you? We're done. You just asked me to wade through one of the worst cesspools of misogynist hate I've encountered in a long time. Your response to this will probably go unread.

...when fits of creativity run strong, more than one programmer or writer has been known to abandon the desktop for the more spacious floor. - Fred Brooks, Jr.

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