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Comment: Re:How about a converted 122-key "typewriter"? (Score 1) 147

by Ed Avis (#49707551) Attached to: Mechanical 'Clicky' Keyboards Still Have Followers (Video)
I've done that - put black M13 caps on an F122 - but what do you do about the Enter key on the numeric keypad? The F has a stabilizer wire which the M lacks, so if you put the black key on as-is it sits limply and doesn't click properly. Similarly, the spacebar stabilizer wire is different - how do you get the black spacebar to attach properly? I see that whoever did that mod changed the F to ANSI layout. I kept mine as ISO but that meant I had to stay with a few non-black keys.

Comment: Look at Panasonic's tablet (Score 1) 450

by Ed Avis (#49231947) Attached to: Reactions to the New MacBook and Apple Watch
The real competition (in features, that is, not price) for an Apple tablet would be the Panasonic Toughpad 4k, a monster 20-inch tablet with 3840x2560 resolution (that is, 4:3 aspect ratio). It's a beautiful piece of kit but hugely expensive. Apple could put the same panel in a 20 inch "iPad Pro" or "MacPad" and if priced more keenly it could sell well among those doing graphics work who want something more portable than a desktop.

Comment: Re:Irrelevent (Score 1) 94

You're right that Dell laptops are relatively easy to modify and upgrade - for a laptop. But still you can't expect to transplant a motherboard into any but the most closely related model. I upgraded my old M90 to an M6300 by replacing the motherboard, CPU and memory. For the M6400, I believe that the motherboard and case from the M6500 should be compatible (provided you change the CPU and CPU heatsink) but I cannot be entirely sure. The newer 17 inch Dell models have 1920x1080 screens instead of 1920x1200. You couldn't jam the older screen into them because it is physically a different size, even if the connector turns out to be the same.

Comment: Re:Modern Technology (Score 2) 189

by Ed Avis (#48766465) Attached to: UK Government Department Still Runs VME Operating System Installed In 1974
I think you're missing the point. It is not about hardware durability. The original hardware installed in 1974 has long since been replaced (probably several times over). It is the software that costs money over the long term - hiring programmers to maintain it. And it is the software that is the reason the system hasn't been replaced with something else.

"If you lived today as if it were your last, you'd buy up a box of rockets and fire them all off, wouldn't you?" -- Garrison Keillor

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