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Comment Re:Worse than clickbait ! (Score 3, Insightful) 386

2) If intelligence agencies are watching Twitter accounts for covert intelligence, that is idiotic. Twitter posts are public, easy to find, and unencrypted (I suppose you could hide a secret message in a Twitter post, but anyway...). It seems to me that the Rickrolling is perfect for disrupting ISIS sponsored Twitter recruitment accounts. When it comes to actually planning attacks, I imagine this makes no difference whatsoever--that is more likely done by ISIS on encrypted non-public channels that the intelligence agencies are trying to find and decrypt.

Except that they're not using encrypted channels to do the planning and execution. That's been made abundantly clear in the last week with multiple articles in the papers telling us as much. All of their chatter was done over phone texting. That's it. Nothing fancy. Nothing requiring any government to intrude on or break otherwise normal encrypted messaging. Maybe that's the problem. We've built up a boogieman in our minds that is this incredible supervillian-esque monster that's going to be doing everything on side channels with embedded encryption protocols and stenographic images.

I mean, that's what they're doing, right? It's what the old Soviet regimes were thought to do. Who knows, maybe these guys are just stuck in the world the way it was thirty or forty years ago.

To my mind it goes back to the OP's point. They're not using intelligence to stop these people. The question is it incompetence, malfeasance, apathy, or some combination of all three?

Comment Between a rock and a hard place... (Score 5, Interesting) 56

That is entirely of their own making.

They didn't need to create the ContentID system and allow it work the way it does. But they did.

By law they needed a way to respond to DMCA notices but they didn't need to automate it. And now those chickens have come home to roost.

All in all, Google stepping up to start sorting out this mess they made all by themselves is a good thing. I am hopeful they see it through by changing the way their system works and maybe taking out some of the automation that is one of the biggest problems with it. May they also push some sane legislation that will make it possible to do away with the worst abuses of the Notice system.

Comment WHY? (Score 3, Insightful) 69

I don't understand why, as a commercial, professional developer you didn't take the time to find or demand a copy of the code from a third party plug-in. And if you couldn't do that, why you'd still go and use it. That seems like a huge amount of built-in trouble.

Can it be cheaper to not do your homework? Certainly! But look at what it costs you. You now have an app that's getting rejected by the publisher. You've now gone and tarnished your brand and reputation. And you've likely opened up your users to all kinds of possible trouble, not to mention any future ramifications of the if/when their data is stolen.

Why not just do the homework and be safe from the start?

Comment Re:Other bugs (Score 1) 410

What I want to know is what these companies will do once they have the data. AFAICT it's like the underwear gnomes.

1) Get the data
2) ????
3) Profit!

So you sell the data to an aggregator. What if they've already have the data? What then? What happens when our lives are so well integrated into these feedback systems that no one wants the data anymore? Or that the data is so close to worthless it doesn't matter?

Comment Re:Gravity (Score 0) 261

It is not. In fact, it's not just gravity that would be an issue.

There is also the fact that it doesn't have a magnetic field like Earth's. This also keeps the solar wind from blasting away the atmosphere.

Just because they'd be released doesn't mean that's all that would be needed to terraform Mars.

Comment Good luck with that in the US (Score 2) 237

We don't teach how to fail in any segment of our schooling, which is somewhat necessary in addressing ignorance. Failure is taught to be avoided at all costs. Failure is mocked, ridiculed as a personal flaw instead of something that everyone experiences. We don't teach that failure is something that happens even when we've put our best effort into the work. That failure happens when you've done everything right and according to the rules. And in neither of those cases is failure something bad. It's just something that happens in life.

Comment Re:Try focusing on keeping subscribers (Score 5, Insightful) 319

The entertainment industry has a long history of ignoring their customers and trying to dictate what is popular.

For a short time, relatively speaking, they've been able to figure out how to do that and reaping a huge profit while it was happening. The amount of money was so big it blinded them to how the world and their markets were changing. Instead, these industries focused and focused again on how to industrialize (for lack of a better term) popularity of a few things. That is to say the popularity of "Boy Bands" in the '90s wasn't a complete accident and that yes, if you thought there was a formula for them there is indeed is.

At this point, much of the upper brass in these companies are so entrenched into these methods of profit that they can't see how to get out and maintain their power structures. It's not just the profits that they've become used to. It's also their position. Which is only human. They perceive that they've worked hard to become VP or Pres of their current company and their actions aren't going to disrupt that even if it means long term their industry will survive.

For what it's worth, these companies will continue to discount the success of Netflix and others simply because to do otherwise would likely imperil their current position. Change, will only occur when the companies are facing complete ruin, if it happens at all. Until such time that we see TW or Sony winding up their studio arms, I don't think we'll see them adapting.

Comment No, these companies need to follow the law (Score 5, Insightful) 273

Look, I get that these guys are trying to do something new. And for that I applaud them and their efforts. However until there are new laws supporting the sort of things they're trying to do they need to follow the current laws especially regarding employment.

Just because you came up with a new way to run things doesn't mean that the rest of it like it or agree that's the way the world should work. Especially when it seems like all you're doing is trying to dodge current legal frameworks without any good reason for doing so.

Comment Re:nonsense (Score 2) 532

I think they meant that there's no longer an option to think that society is just them and their immediate family & friends, that they could no longer ignore the plight of other people who are so much more than what you see on the surface, and all that mucking about with taxation, a subject much like society itself, is a complex thing that is full of nuances and consists of more that what you had for breakfast yesterday.

But that's just what I think about people who choose to jump right away on the if the government does it, it's bad bandwagon.

Comment Self Posession (Score 1) 698

If nothing else, she needs to be taught that she is self-possessed. That this is her life, her body, her decisions. That what other people may want of her can be considered, even negotiated around, but that in the end it is what she wants that should count the most.

She is going to be pulled in many directions, face many things that you and your wife have already passed through and have only the fleetest memories of. To navigate those and other unforeseeable difficulties the best thing that can be bequeathed her is an unshakable sense of self. It will help her through doubts and tribulations. It will be assailed by everything and everyone around her, tempting her to be things she is not. Which is why it is so very important that she has it, holds on it, and knows when to reinvent it.

Comment They brought it on themselves (Score 5, Insightful) 379

It could have been easy to get along and keep doing what they were doing, but no, Verizon has to go and sue in court. They had to challenge the weaker rules, force Wheeler's hand and cause this to happen.

It's their own fault here.

They brought it on themselves in a very real, legally binding way.

I couldn't be gloating any harder than I am right now.

Comment Coming full circle (Score 2) 309

So how about that? A programming language that'll download and store a program for later use just in case the network connection isn't stable or available. Sounds good to me. Having more than one way to get a program is a great thing to do.

Seems to me that if I can't rely on my network I'd want some sort of storage media that'll let me back up or reinstall the base program. It should also be light and easy to transport with plenty of additional storage space, just in case of anything.

Seriously, the older I get the more I find out that everything old is new again.

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.