Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Trust the World's Fastest VPN with Your Internet Security & Freedom - A Lifetime Subscription of PureVPN at 88% off. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment Re:will probably take off with next gen hardware (Score 1) 128

Hololens is not VR

Indeed. AR doesn't seem to trigger the same motion sickness responses as VR, because you retain all of the visual cues from the real world.

Microsoft is once again creating a product that nobody will use.

Microsoft has created a technology that anyone can use without feeling motion sick, but you think that it will lose in the marketplace to one that about 80% of people can use without feeling motion sick? That's an interesting perspective.

Comment Re:It's just too expensive for the hardware (Score 1) 128

It's not so clear with 3D. It's something of a misnomer to call current displays 2D and this kind of VR interface 3D. Both provide a subset of the dozen or so cues that the human brain uses to turn inputs into a 3D mental model. They both, for example, manage occlusion and distance blurring, but neither manages (yet) to correctly adjust the focal depth of parts of the image that are further away. Motion sickness is caused by disagreements between some of these cues and between the other cues that you use to build your mental model of the world. VR adjusts the image based on your head position (though latency here can cause problems as the visual signal and the inner ear signal come at different times), but it turns out that humans have a very strong notion of body image, so if they don't correctly track your arm positions and update them in the game then this causes nausea in a lot of people.

Unfortunately for the 3D film and game industry, it's not the case that simply adding more cues reduces the risk of motion sickness. It turns out that a third-person perspective on a 2D display is one of the minima for the percentage of the population to experience motion sickness. Move to first person, and this gets worse, though it's still a tiny percentage (some people can't play FPS games for more than a few minutes without feeling sick). Add a few more visual cues and you get a lot more people feeling sick. There's obviously a minimum when you get all of the cues right, because otherwise people would spend their entire lives experiencing motion sickness, but so far none of the mainstream 3D systems have found another point that's close to the 2D display. If you're going to develop a first-person game, and you can either develop it for a technology that 99% of humans can use without feeling sick, or spending more money to develop it for a technology that 80% can use, which would you do?

Comment Re:Oh please (Score 2) 186

The type of "hello world" is const char *, so your compiler should warn that you're dropping the const in an implicit cast (and if you're a sensible person and compile with -Werror, then your compiler will reject the code). You can get the behaviour that you want with:

const char s[] = "hello world";

This will copy the contents of the string literal into a mutable array. If you write this at the global scope, the copy will be done at compile time, so you'll end up with the string in the data section, not the rodata section (if you do it in a variable with automatic storage, you'll get a copy every time the variable comes into scope). Putting constant strings in the rodata section is important for optimisation, because it allows them to be coalesced. If you write "hello world" in two place, then you'll end up with a single string in the rodata section. With some linkers, if you also write "world" somewhere else, then you'll just get two pointers into the same string (this is also one of the reasons that C uses null-terminated strings: you can't do this with Pascal strings, and it saved a useful amount of memory on the PDP-11). Once you're sharing the string, it becomes a really bad idea to allow someone to modify it, because that modification will then become visible in a different bit of code.

Comment Re:Oh please (Score 1) 186

That's pretty common for OO languages (or, in fact, any language with a notion of subtyping), where individual classes implement their own comparison operators. In C++ you can overload the comparison operators, but most OO languages that don't do operator overloading just use a named method. If you write a.equals(b), then you'll call the equals method implemented by the class of a. If you write b.equals(a) then you'll call the method implemented by the class of b. One may know about the other, but the converse is not guaranteed. The Objective-C collection classes document certain invariants for inserting objects into sets (or as keys in a dictionary), including that [a isEqual: b] implies [b isEqual: a] (and that [a isEqual: b] implies that [a hash] equals [b hash]), but this is impossible to statically verify in the general case.

Comment Re:Umm (Score 1) 362

Teaching critical thinking in school can't stand up to the power of indoctrination by Mom, Dad, and God at home. Religious parents actively work to ensure that their children see them (and the church) as the only authoritative source of truth.

Way to paint with a broad brush. Catholic schools are full of the children of religious parents, and the instructors are usually priests and nuns. The nuns will kick your damned ass if you're intellectually lazy. Whenever I reflect on my education, I always thank Sister Catherine Joseph, one of my 6th grade teachers. She was a mean woman, and I hated her guts, but she was one of the best teachers I've ever known. She taught two subjects: Science and Religion, and she taught both of them rigorously, and well.

Never underestimate someone who believes they have been commanded by god to turn your child into a thinking, reasoning, well educated member of society.

Comment Re:Response to Walmart.com (Score 1) 181

I've been using Walmart online lately as I become more wary about Amazon's size. Their customer service is excellent. When I do in store pickup there is rarely a wait, returns are hassle free, heck even their extended warranty paid for a new bicycle when I wore the old one out.

I wouldn't dream of trying to get an employee to answer any questions beyond where a department is. However for my limited use they are doing a good job. It sure feels weird to have Walmart be the underdog, but up against Amazon I guess they are.

Comment From an unnamed Oxford lecturer (Score 2) 362

"nothing that you will learn in the course of your studies will be of the slightest use to you in after life â" save only this â" that if you work hard and intelligently you should be able to detect when a man is talking rot, and that, in my view is the main, if not the sole purpose of education"

Comment Re:Umm (Score 1) 362

It's called citing your sources and peer review.

That doesn't matter any more. Look at Trump's claims about vaccines and autism. How many times has it been shown the study he cites is completely fake? How many discussions on here have gone over this same subject?

Witness Trump's comments about vote fraud. He says it took place but cites no evidence. In fact, when he filed to stop the vote recounts he explicitly cited no evidence of vote fraud taking place so there was no reason for the recounts.

I could go on but it's quite clear citing evidence, showing the facts and everything which is normally done to show how one side is lying, is no longer effective. Instead, the more evidence one shows the more they are shouted down. Why? Because showing evidence and facts hurts people's feelings. It forces them to admit they're wrong and in so doing makes them feel bad. Evolution anyone?

Comment Re:Marketers are idiots (Score 1) 47

Apple hasn't just been talking about this, they've implemented this for a while. Many of their devices take a physical SIM and also contain an eSIM, so you can have the SIM for your home network in their physically, but when you travel abroad you don't need to physically buy a local SIM to use for a week, you just pull up the settings screen and buy a short-term plan from one of a variety of different providers.

Comment Re:This is an OS (Score 2) 158

Try deleting all of your Google cookies and visiting YouTube. You can't even watch a video until you've clicked through a bunch of T&Cs explaining that you agree to their data collecting and sharing. There's a button at the bottom saying 'I agree' and another saying 'other options', if you click on the second one, then you get to a big page full of text that basically boils down to 'sucks to be you.' If you create a Google account, then you can somewhat restrict what they'll collect to anonimised, but there's a load of research showing that basically any form of anonimised data can be deanonimised by combining it with other data sets (which, by coincidence, Google also collects).

Slashdot Top Deals

We will have solar energy as soon as the utility companies solve one technical problem -- how to run a sunbeam through a meter.

Working...