Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Comment Re:America in one sentence (Score 1) 241

There was also a law in the early history of the U.S. which required people to register with the government if they owned a firearm. That way the government knew who they could call upon in times of insurrection or invasion to defend the country and those who would need to be given a weapon in such times.

Of course you'll never hear any of this from the NRA.

Comment Re:December 30th (Score 1) 285

It was also the "done thing" to lurk for a while before posting. Well, that was the case before Eternal September, anyway...

This. If I would have made an account when I started using /., I'd have a 3 or low 4 digit uid, and given that both of us made accounts around the same time, I'd wager you would as well. There's something to be said for actually learning about a community before you join it.

Comment Re:Is he going for irony, here? (Score 3, Informative) 184

In terms of Linux, it's not classical security through obscurity, it's security through diversity. One of the reasons Slammer was so painful a decade ago was that most institutions had a Windows monoculture. The time between one machine being infected on your network and every machine on your network being infected was about 10 minutes (a fresh Windows install on the network was compromised before it finished running Windows Update for the first time). If you'd had a network that was 50% Windows and 50% something else, then it would only have infected half of your infrastructure and you'd have been able to pull the plug on the Windows machines and start recovery. It's possible to write cross-platform malware, but it's a lot harder (though there's some fun stuff out of one of the recent DARPA programs writing exploit code that is valid x86 and ARM code, relying on encodings that are nops in one and valid in the other, interspersed with the converse). Writing malware that can attack half a dozen combinations of OS and application software is difficult.

This is why Verisign's root DNS runs 50% Linux, 50% FreeBSD and of those they run two or three userland DNS servers, so an attack on a particular OS or particular DNS server will only take out (at most) half of the machines. Even an attack on an OS combined with an independent attack on the DNS server will still leave them with about a quarter functional, which will result in a bit more latency for Internet users, but leave them functioning.

Comment Re:AV only helps if you are bad (Score 4, Interesting) 184

You got lucky. There are two problems with most Antivirus software:

Most of them still use system call interposition. They're vulnerable to a whole raft of time-of-check to time-of-use errors, so the only part that actually catches things is the binary signature checking, and that requires you to install updates more frequently than malware authors release new versions - it's a losing battle.

They run some quite buggy code in high privilege. In the last year, all of the major AV vendors have had security vulnerabilities. My favourite one was Norton, which had a buffer overflow in their kernel-mode scanner. Providing crafted data to it allowed an attacker to get kernel privilege (higher than administrator privilege on Windows). You could send someone an email containing an image attachment and compromise their system as long as their mail client downloaded the image, even if they didn't open it. It's hard to argue that software that allows that makes your computer more secure.

Comment Re:Big data is gonna kill small crime (Score 3, Interesting) 85

Because the multiple trillions of dollars we've already spent trying to instill common sense into people, the multitude of social programs designed to try and help people get jobs or a roof over their head, the grants or subsidies to help people start their own businesses and all the other programs who in one way or another have tried to set people on the correct path to life have worked so well we should spend trillions more.

The easiest way to reduce the prison population and those committing repeat crimes is to execute people. Domestic violence. Gone. You don't beat the crap out the woman (or man) you're living with and think that's acceptable.

You don't have multiple crimes against you before you're 18 then get a free pass to start the process over. Rapes, child molestation/rape, recidivists, murderers in general, gone.

Clean out the system instead of coddling and you will see a dramatic improvement in society. With the criminals gone, who will commit the crimes?

Comment Re:Go Kim (Score 1, Insightful) 70

Because allowing people to "buy" products to which you have no right to be "selling" in the first place is something we should defend.

When your company produces a product I'll be sure to "share" it with millions of people while charging them for it. I'm certain your company won't mind me making money off their efforts.

Comment Re: They're not capable of mind control... (Score 1) 145

TL;DR.

Your fine rant, though, ignores the fact that the Iraq war is the one without an actual reason. The war in Afghanistan started because they were harboring Osama bin Laden, and we demanded they turn him over to answer for what al-Qaeda had done. It certainly went off the rails from there, with many people believing the Taliban had something to do with 9/11, but the original reason for the war was good enough to pass muster with a large coalition, including multiple nations that have had a significant aversion to military action since the mid 20th century sending troops as well.

Comment Re:For the percentage impaired... (Score 1) 85

Your points are persuasive, but most people* would likely parse the phrases "twice as fast" and "two times faster" as meaning the same thing which throws your entire point into disarray. Percentages are obvious, "as fast/faster" appears to be a personal stylistic choice.

*: "most people" definitely falls afoul of the "no true scotsman" fallacy, but it's not like I'm going to go out and conduct a survey on the issue.

Slashdot Top Deals

Success is something I will dress for when I get there, and not until.

Working...