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Comment Re:the laws may take 3-5 years to get rid of drive (Score 1) 42

Quite, the same thing happened when they started to introduce human driven motor vehicles in place of the horse powered vehicles in the late 19th Century. A few lawsuits later, and nobody wanted to drive cars any more because of the risk. That's why we're stuck with horse and buggies in 2017, and nobody has gasoline or electrically powered motor vehicles.

(The concept you're looking for is "Insurance".)

Comment Re:written in Go (Score 2) 28

I don't think real developers care. As long as it's not written in LISP or some other language that's radically different from normal paradigms, and as long as the development environment is just a matter of checking some options in their favorite IDE, most programmers will be entirely happy.

You grossly underestimate the ability of decent programmers to switch from language to language. What we care about is not whether a language is rarely used, but whether it can do what we need it to easily and quickly - and whether the libraries are easily googlelable of course.

Go is a mainstream language, if a little basic. It's fine. That won't be the problem.

Comment Re:The whole "blue light thing" is pure BS. (Score 1) 110

Humans don't need complete dark to sleep.
Some humans do need complete darkness to stay healthy. It turns out that people on common anti-cancer drugs who use night lights or have other sources of light 24 hrs a day have a much higher fatality rate than those who sleep in complete darkness for at least 2 hours a night.

There have been plenty of studies linking light pollution to melatonin levels and several types of cancer.

Based on numbers I've seen for Australia, light pollution is interfering with the one of the most common drugs used for breast cancer increasing the factuality rate by as much as 10%.

Comment The crypto is the easy part of this (Score 2) 173

The cryptography algorithms are the easy part. The vary hard part is protecting keys so I hope someone provides plenty of examples of how to do that properly. I hope they don't go down the Java route of showing how to use the functions without proper key management.

Comment Re:Hmm (Score 1) 379

I'd be enormously surprised if Chinese businessmen working in manufacturing industries dependent upon American and European clients aren't interested in news relating to how easy it'll be to export to the US and to European nations in the near future. I would, absolutely, expect them to show more interest than they've done in the past given the ramifications for Trump, who appears to oppose the degree of international trade we have, and Brexit, which will change the relationship of nations and thus have massive ramifications for trade.

Just because the "average" Chinese person doesn't care, doesn't mean that a significant minority will suddenly have a lot more interest in US and European events than they did previously. With China being a fairly populous country, you'd expect that to amount to a lot of new readers.

Comment Re:Hard to read (Score 5, Insightful) 379

You mean they should stop reporting on the President of the United States when he does something with serious consequences if whatever he did happens to be a bad thing?

That's... not the way the press is supposed to act in a free society, FWIW. The Press is supposed to cover what the government does and what the impact of that is. You might not like that, but the rest of us prefer it that way.

Comment Re:Kowtowing (Score 3, Insightful) 379

People have been claiming newspapers are obsolete in some shape or form for 50 years, ever since television became everyone's primary method for keeping up with the news. In practice, newspapers, while hit, never went away, while TV news has become supplanted by the Internet.

And who is dominating news on the Internet? Oh, yeah, the newspapers. Most of us have at least one newspaper's website that's on our rotation of sites to check every day, despite the attempts to get us to use news apps or search engine news aggregators - both of which suffer in that they mix the latest from, say, the Daily Mail, with that of The Guardian or Washington Post.

As for this:

Few people spend the time to read the entire article when they are looking for headlines and sound bites

Few do, But few have ever done. You think, if you teleported back to a New York Subway car in the 1940s, every strap hanger was reading the New York Times on the way to work? Go to a London Underground Tube Train in the 1950s, and every passenger was reading The Times, Guardian, or Telegraph?

There's always been a range of newspapers providing news in different formats for different readers, and the most popular have always been the ones screaming headlines that today we'd call "clickbait", and whose articles are scarcely a few sentences long.

The New York Times is an exception, because it caters for the market of people who want more. It's always been a small minority that reads it. The difference between the days of paper and today are that all of a sudden the NYT can have an engaged audience that spreads far beyond the range a printed, time critical, newspaper can be delivered within, and that without page limits, its no longer limited to coverage of the region it serves.

Which is why the New York Times is doing very well right now, when 20 years ago it wasn't.

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