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Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Oh sorry, second after "What does it mean to leave the EU." Thanks for correcting me and strengthening my argument. These people had no fucking clue what just happened the day before.

*sigh*

Here's another explanation.

But the real point is it's an irrelevant and stupid argument. I mean - even if one were to accept that X number of people googling a term a day after a particular event must carry more weight than all the people who might have googled the same term every day before that event - are you seriously trying to argue Google trends should direct how to run a country ?

That's a glib way to hand-wave away any argument.

Your argument is that you can't see any possible positive outcome, therefore it was a bad idea.

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Would you think a second vote would be more acceptable if as a condition of holding it, there could be no third vote?

No, I don't think there is any reason to hold a second vote at all.

And it's not deceitful to suggest that they made an informed and well-considered decision when the most popular search query in the UK the following day was "what is the EU"?

no it wasn't.

When the decision was objectively stupid unless you hate the concept of the EU's power more than the trillions in economic damage currently being wrought? The decision to leave is not a decision an informed populace would make for any reason other than an overpowering tantrum of xenophobia and jingoism, which didn't seem to match the public's mood. It was made due to extreme ignorance.

These are religious statements.

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

Do you think there would be a petition for a third vote if the outcome was the same?

Yes.

I don't think so. It's the same reason you usually don't ask a person if they're sure more than once, and important switches only have only one safety cover on them.

The "safety cover" was weeks of campaigning and years of debate leading up to the referendum.

Do not try to suggest the idea of leaving the EU was sprung upon the people with little warning. It's just deceitful.

Comment Re:As it's been said... (Score 1) 621

The people's will is not being respected, their call to have their choice confirmed is being ignored. The people are being denied an opportunity to express their will. If it's the will of the people to leave the EU and they haven't changed their minds, they'll vote the same way again.

The only place this reasoning leads is perpetual elections.

Look at it another way - ~16 million people voted to remain. ~4 million signed this petition. So only about a quarter of those who voted remain could be bothered to "confirm" their choice.

"You'll vote, and you'll keep voting until you get the right answer" isn't democratic.

Comment Re:she's a hypocrit (Score 1) 321

Or just sending someone out in the middle of the night to burn their factories (or whatever) down.

That's what a real "unregulated" market looks like.

But we all know what people _really_ mean when they write "unregulated" is "regulated the way I agree with". Just like a "statist" is someone who thinks there should be one more law than they do.

Comment Re:she's a hypocrit (Score 1) 321

Rubbish.

A dominant market position facilitating the destruction (or outright prevention) of new entrants requires no "government protection", neither does sole control of a unique and necessary resource.

If you control the only source of fresh water on a desert island, you have a monopoly.

Submission + - US Efforts To Regulate Encryption Have Been Flawed, Government Report Finds (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: U.S. Republican congressional staff said in a report released Wednesday that previous efforts to regulate privacy technology were flawed and that lawmakers need to learn more about technology before trying to regulate it. The 25-page white paper is entitled Going Dark, Going Forward: A Primer on the Encryption Debate and it does not provide any solution to the encryption fight. However, it is notable for its criticism of other lawmakers who have tried to legislate their way out of the encryption debate. It also sets a new starting point for Congress as it mulls whether to legislate on encryption during the Clinton or Trump administration. "Lawmakers need to develop a far deeper understanding of this complex issue before they attempt a legislative fix," the committee staff wrote in their report. The committee calls for more dialogue on the topic and for more interviews with experts, even though they claim to have already held more than 100 such briefings, some of which are classified. The report says in the first line that public interest in encryption has surged once it was revealed that terrorists behind the Paris and San Bernardino attacks "used encrypted communications to evade detection."

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