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Submission + - SPAM: NASA aircraft probe Namibian clouds to solve global warming puzzle

sciencehabit writes: Off the coast of Namibia, for several months a year, a layer of smoke from African savanna fires drifts over a persistent deck of low clouds. It’s the perfect place to investigate the thorniest problem in all of climate science: how haze and clouds interact to boost or moderate global warming. Now, after weeks of delay and uncertainty, an airborne research campaign is about to begin. On 29 August, NASA will fly aircraft into the heart of this natural laboratory for about a month, with plans to return in 2017 and 2018. Complementary efforts from France and the United Kingdom would have expanded the sampling area but were postponed when the teams couldn’t get diplomatic clearances from Namibia.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Apples Fixes Three Zero Days Used in Government Targeted Attack

Trailrunner7 writes: Apple has patched three critical vulnerabilities in iOS that were identified when an attacker targeted a human rights activist in the UAE with an exploit chain that used the bugs to attempt to remotely jailbreak and infect his iPhone.

The vulnerabilities include two kernel flaws and one in WebKit and Apple released iOS 9.3.5 to fix them. The attack that set off the investigation into the vulnerabilities targeted Ahmed Mansoor, an activist living in the UAE. Earlier this month, he received a text message that included a link to what was supposedly new information on human rights abuses. Suspicious, Manor forwarded the link to researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, who recognized what they were looking at.

“On August 10 and 11, 2016, Mansoor received SMS text messages on his iPhone promising “new secrets” about detainees tortured in UAE jails if he clicked on an included link. Instead of clicking, Mansoor sent the messages to Citizen Lab researchers. We recognized the links as belonging to an exploit infrastructure connected to NSO Group, an Israel-based ‘cyber war’ company that sells Pegasus, a government-exclusive “lawful intercept” spyware product,” Citizen Lab said in a new report on the attack and iOS flaws.

Submission + - Proposed 'social media ID, please' law met with anger (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: A plan by the U.S. government to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media IDs on key travel documents is being called by critics “ludicrous,” an “all-around bad idea,” “blatant overreach,” “desperate, paranoid heavy-handedness,” “preposterous,” “appalling,” and “un-American." That's just a sampling of the outrage. Some 800 responded to the U.S. request for comments about a proposed rule affecting people traveling from “visa waiver” countries to the U.S., where a visa is not required. This includes most of Europe, Singapore, Chile, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand. Travelers will be asked to provide their Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google+, and whatever other social ID you can imagine to U.S. authorities. It’s technically an “optional” request, but since it’s the government asking, critics believe travelers will fear consequences if they ignore it. People who are traveling from a country where a visa is required, such as India or China, get a security vetting when they apply for a visa at a U.S. consulate, so this proposal doesn’t apply to them. In a little twist of irony, some critics said U.S. President Obama’s proposal for foreign travelers is so bad, it must have been hatched by Donald Trump.

Submission + - The emotional side of the H-1B visa program explained (computerworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The vast majority of people who work in IT did everything right: They invested in their education, studied difficult subjects, kept their skills updated. They own homes, raise families and look to the future. But no job is safe, no future entirely secure — something IT workers know more than most. Given their role, they are most often the change agents, the people who deploy technologies and bring in automation that can turn workplaces upside down. To survive, they count on being smart, self-reliant and one step ahead. Over the years, Computerworld reporter Patrick Thibodeau has interviewed scores of IT workers who trained their visa-holding replacements. Though details each time may differ, they all tell the same basic story. There are many issues around high-skilled immigration, but to grasp the issue fully you need to understand how the H-1B program can affect American workers.

Submission + - China Bans Ad Blocking, Adblock Plus Cries Foul (adexchanger.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two weeks ago, China released its first ever set of digital ad regulations that impacted Chinese market leaders like Baidu and Alibaba. "But hidden among (the new regulations) is language that would seem to all but ban ad blocking," wrote Adblock Plus (ABP) operations manager Ben Williams in a blog post Wednesday. The new regulations prohibit "the use of network access, network devices, applications, and the disruption of normal advertising data, tampering with or blocking others doing advertising business (or) unauthorized loading the ad." There is also a clause included that addresses tech companies that "intercept, filter, cover, fast-forward and [impose] other restrictions" on online ad campaigns. ABP general counsel Kai Recke said in an email to AdExchanger that the Chinese State Administration for Industry and Commerce (SAIC) has much more control over the market than its otherwise equal U.S. counterpart, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). "After all it looks like the Chinese government tries to get advertising more under their control and that includes that they want to be the only ones to be allowed to remove or alter ads,” said Recke. “Ad-block users are a distinct audience and they require a distinct strategy and ways to engage them,” said ABP CEO Till Faida at AdExchanger’s Clean Ads I/O earlier this year. “They have different standards they’ve expressed for accessing them, and advertising has to reflect that."

Submission + - Meat Freezing Contractor Review: Finding And Hiring The Best Tunnel Freezers

donaldcpkillough writes: How a licensed tunnel freezers troubleshooting contractor treats people is possibly the most crucial thing to look for when choosing one. It's usually best to find a licensed spiral freezer troubleshooting manufacturing supplier who you can trust to work alone in your absence. Check his references carefully, so that you know he won't be tempted to cut corners when he's completing your project. You can confirm that you've found the perfect tunnel freezers troubleshooting builder by going over the recommendations that follow.

Upon hiring a spiral freezer troubleshooting manufacturing builder, you must treat them as a member of your team. Analyze every detail of the legal agreement carefully and ask any relevant questions before agreeing to sign the document. You should pay half the total amount or less for your initial payment. You can get a good idea of the tunnel freezers troubleshooting distributor's ability to organize and operate a business if you can see how smoothly his office operates, so it is a perfect idea to make an appointment to sign the final paperwork at that location.

Communicating clearly with your spiral freezer troubleshooting engineering manufacturer is really the surest way to a successful project. It's essential to evaluate potential issues both calmly and with an open-minded attitude. Exceptional communication is really the foundation of a productive relationship. Record every communication with your spiral freezer troubleshooting wholesaler to prevent possible legal disputes.

spiral freezer troubleshooting manufacturers with great reputations are always in high demand. If a spiral freezer troubleshooting company has a waiting list, he's usually a great choice to manage your job. Expect to share such a talented tunnel freezers troubleshooting company with at least one other client during the course of your project — it is rare to find someone with a large client base who is willing to limit his earning potential. Always think carefully and trust your gut when finding a spiral freezer troubleshooting manufacturer.

Inform your service provider ahead of time when you have any pets so that there're no issues. You'll need to eliminate your pet animal from the area if he or she will get in the way of the spiral freezer troubleshooting manufacturing specialist's work. Having a pet in the work area is both dangerous for your pet animal and your employees. When one has the ability to provide a detailed estimate just before commencing work, they are truly a highly talented tunnel freezers troubleshooting company. An estimate is created only once you have shared all of the details of the job. Work estimates should always be given in writing, not verbally. There should never be a need to guess when the tunnel freezers troubleshooting business has done a full project survey.

There're still quite a number of reliable tunnel freezers troubleshooting engineering experts to be found in the yellow pages of your local telephone directory, even though a lot of people discount it as ridiculously old-fashioned. You could choose particular tunnel freezers troubleshooting contractors to interview and learn more about. An accurate and detailed contract should spell everything out clearly including financial details and payment schedule. spiral freezer troubleshooting manufacturing suppliers have a duty to keep their job site neat, thus, ask to clean up if you feel it's unsightly or dangerous.

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Submission + - Frontier Teams With AT&T To Block Google Fiber Access To Utility Poles (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Frontier submitted a court filing last week supporting ATT's efforts to sue local governments in Louisville and Jefferson County, Kentucky to stop a new ordinance designed to give Google Fiber and similar companies access to utility poles. They're concerned the ordinances will spread to other states. Frontier's filing said, "the issues raised by the case may have important implications for Frontier's business and may impact the development of law in jurisdictions throughout the country where Frontier operates." The ordinance in Louisville lets companies like Google Fiber install wires even if ATT doesn't respond to requests or rejects requests to attach lines. Companies don't have to notify ATT when they want to move ATT's wires to make room for their own wires, assuming the work won't cause customer outages. ATT claims that the ordinance lets competitors "seize ATT's property." Frontier is urging the court to consider the nationwide implications of upholding Louisville's ordinance, saying Louisville's rule "is unprecedented" because "it drastically expands the rights of third parties to use privately owned utility poles, giving non-owners unfettered access to [a] utility's property without the [...] utility in some cases even having knowledge that such third-party intrusion on its facilities is occurring." Frontier said companies should be required to negotiation access with the owners if they didn't pay to install the utility poles. They urged the court to deny Louisville Metro's motion to dismiss ATT's complaint.

Submission + - Third Party Apple Product Repair Under Attack

alzoron writes: After the failure of New York's Fair Repair Act independent third party unauthorized Apple repair shops seem to be under attack. Louis Rossmann, owner of Rossman Repair Group, INC has uploaded a somewhat vague video alluding to his Youtube site, where he posts videos about repairing out of warranty repairs, possibly being shut down. Several sources (Reddit, Mac Kung Fu, 9 to 5 Mac) have been speculating about this and whether or not Apple is behind this.

Submission + - We're looking for ET all wrong

StartsWithABang writes: When you consider that there are definitely millions of planets in the habitable zones of their stars within our Milky Way galaxy alone, the possibility that there’s intelligent life on at least one of them, right now, is tantalizing. But we’re in our technological infancy, relatively speaking, having only been broadcasting electromagnetic signatures visible by an alien civilization for around 80 years. Unsurprisingly, we’re looking for exactly the types of signals we’re capable of sending, but what if that’s totally wrongheaded? Based on how technology is evolving and what the Universe is capable of, perhaps we should be looking not at electromagnetic radiation, but neutrino or gravitational wave signals from the distant Universe to search for alien civilizations.

Submission + - "The Alternative" Puts the Brakes on Bullets Fired From Police Sidearms (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Aiming for a leg or shooting a weapon from a criminal's hands may be an option for cops in the movies, but real police officers are trained to shoot for the center of mass, not necessarily to kill, but to stop – although the end result can often be one and the same. "The Alternative" is designed to give officers a less lethal option in the form of a clip-on "air bag" for semiautomatic pistols that reduces the velocity of a standard round to make it less lethal.

Submission + - The Key to Interviewing at Google (dice.com)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Wired has an excerpt from a new book of Google-centric workplace advice, written by Laszlo Bock, the search-engine giant’s head of “People Operations” (re: Human Resources). In an interesting twist, Bock kicks off the excerpt by describing the brainteaser questions that Google is famous for tossing at job candidates as “useless,” before suggesting that some hiring managers at the company might still use them. (“Sorry about that,” he offered.) Rather than ask candidates to calculate the number of golf balls that can fit inside a 747 (or why manhole covers are round), Google now runs its candidates through a battery of work-sample tests and structured interviews, which its own research and data-crunching suggest is best at finding the most successful candidates. Google also relies on a tool (known as qDroid), which automates some of the process—the interviewer can simply input which job the candidate is interviewing for, and receive a guide with optimized interview questions. It was only a matter of time before people got sick of questions like, "Why are manhole covers round?"

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