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Comment Re:What's the big problem? (Score 1) 478

The terminals in the US can support Chip and Pin.. its the cards issued that lack the encryption (ie: no pin to decrypt the contents).. so its essentially replacing a easily copied mag stripe with a more difficult still relatively easy chip tech.. the entire point of the PIN is to encrypt the card contents. It would have made more sense to get everyone on Chip and Pin (hey, you are transitioning anyway.. just bite the bullet and go all the way... but somehow the US still ended up with a crappy system.

Most of the speed issues in the US stem from the card terminals support chip, but they take longer because they first attempt a "decrypt", which fails, then it falls back to clear code.. then you add this that its being processed at the Register, not the Card Reader. the Card reader is quick, but they moved the "processing" into the POS which is slower because its converting it back into the data stream that the old mag stripe had.

In short.. crap or get off the pot.. commit to Chip and Pin or don't.. the half-assed solution is what is pissing off people.

Submission + - Mozilla to Remove Hello in Firefox 49 (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An entry on Mozilla's issue tracker opened on July 17 reveals ongoing efforts from Mozilla engineers to remove the Hello system add-on from default Firefox installations starting with version 49, set for public release on September 13, 2016.

Mozilla added Hello to Firefox in version 34, released on December 1, 2014, and from the beginning, it was part of the browser's core code, but was moved in December 2015 into a separate add-on, one that came pre-installed with Firefox, making Hello its first ever system add-on.

Mozilla plans to remove Hello from the codebases of Firefox Beta 49, Firefox Developer Edition 50, and Firefox Nightly 51. Based on the currently available information, the deadline for the Hello code removal operations is for this Monday, August 1, after which the first Firefox builds with no Hello integration will be available for testing, and will ship out in the fall with the stable release.

Comment Re: Thanks to (Score 1) 368

I don't really see any difference between logged in or not on the mobile site. Could it be a preferences thing? Have you also tried using private browsing so you don't need to restart he whole browser?

The mobile site is so annoying though. I get tons of comments shown with "Filtered due to preferences." - why? Hide it so my display isn't cluttered and don't force me to scroll through it. Why is scrolling to the top broken on the iPhone? Why does the mobile site waste space with navigation controls in the content when my browser already handled this fine? Etc.

Comment Re: Thanks to (Score 1) 368

Sometimes it's difficult to post a follow-up clarification because of the mandatory delay between posts and because of the flaky proxy detection thing.

Bring able to add something at the end seems useful, but should probably be restricted in length.

Being a nerd site, we could probably do some clever (over engineered?) history thing, and moderators could actually vote which version is the default that people see.

Comment Re: Sounds Familiar. (Score 3, Interesting) 156

This was known and discussed. But they found microgravity to be a compounding effect of radiation exposure

This just drives home how much of a risk interplanetary flight is right now. And we really don't have great solutions that don't involve great masses of shielding. Artificial magnetosopheres for example are insufficient to deal with GCR.

Comment More importantly (Score 5, Insightful) 471

Every vote for a third party is a threat to a major party's political power.

As long as it's not enough of a threat to swing an election, they don't care.

What it DOES do that's useful, though, is tell them:
  - Here's someone who cares enough to take the trouble to vote, but that (both of) you weren't able to attract to your candidate.
  - and THAT (the STATED position of the minor party) is the direction you have to change in order to attract this voter later.

Comment Not just abusive. Also wildly incompetent. (Score 1) 103

Management at Microsoft seems wildly incompetent. It wasn't only Slashdot comment posters who called former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Monkey Boy.

Quote from an article in Forbes Magazine about Steve Ballmer: "Without a doubt, Mr. Ballmer is the worst CEO of a large publicly traded American company today."

Submission + - SPAM: UK judge calls for an "online court" without lawyers

mi writes: A senior judge has called for the establishment of an online court that does not have lawyers and can deal with claims of up to £25,000.

The proposal is the centrepiece of a package of reforms to the civil justice system, drawn up by Lord Justice Briggs, a Court of Appeal judge.

Just how exactly will this court ensure no one is, in fact, a trained professional on the Internet, where no one knows, who you really are, is not explained.

We discussed the idea last year. Apparently, it is still alive.

Link to Original Source

Comment I don't think that's what he did. (Score 1) 1005

So you don't think the Republican candidate for the Presidency of the US inviting a foreign power, one that is at the best of times in a rather tense relationship with the United States, to hack into US systems just to gain dirt on the other party's nominee is reasonable?

It's obvious to a native speaker of English (who isn't astroturfing the Democrats' talking points) that Trump was NOT inviting the Russians to initiate a new crack on his opponent's servers.

He was ribbing his opponents, and keeping their lax security (and their "The Russians are aiding him!" attempt at distraction) in the public eye, by pointing out that the Russians probably ALREADY have the emails that Clinton's people "can't find", and inviting them to dig them out of their own archives and provide them to investigators and/or the press.

People claiming he is inviting new espionage don't just look foolish. They also play into his hands, by keeping the issue in the face of prospective voters.

But feel free to continue. B-)

Submission + - US Government to Pay $2 Million for Automatic Hacking System (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: At this year's DEF CON security conference, DARPA has organized a CTF match of AI systems that will attempt to hack opposing systems and automatically patch and protect their own network. The competition follows classic infosec CTF (Capture The Flag) game rules, but because we're talking about AI, it requires half the time and ten times more security vulnerabilities to fix/protect.

Three DARPA-funded teams qualified for the final round, and four self-funded teams. Each team that reached the final will receive $750,000, and the winner will receive $2 million. DEF CON organizers have invited the winning team to participate in the official DEF CON CTF the following day, marking the first ever CTF match that pits human hackers against AI systems.

Submission + - How transparent should companies be when operational technology failures happen? 1

supernova87a writes: Last week, Southwest Airlines had an epic crash of IT systems across their entire business, when "a router failure caused the airlines' systems to crash... and all backups failed, causing flight delays and cancellations nationwide and costing the company probably $10 million in lost bookings alone." Huge numbers of passengers, crew, airplanes were stranded as not only reservations systems, but scheduling, dispatch, and other critical operational systems had to be rebooted over 12 hours. Passenger delays directly attributable to this incident continued to trickle down all the way from Wednesday to Sunday as the airline recovered.

Aside from the technical issues of what happened, what should a public facing company's obligation be to discuss what happened in full detail? Would publicly talking about the sequence of events before and after failure help restore faith in their operations? Perhaps not aiming for Google-levels of admirable disclosure (as in this 18-minute cloud computing outage where a full post-mortem was given) — but should companies aim to discuss more openly what happened? And how they recover from systems failures?

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