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Comment Re:Translation : ISPS are only CC when it suits th (Score 2) 17

ISPs are not all equivalent. AT&T is a telephone company, and the telephone companies have always been considered common carriers, even when they branched out into providing DSL, and later fiber. Cable companies, on the other hand, are not traditional common carriers, and that status, too, has carried over into their respective Internet services.

Being a common carrier does not mean that the ISP cannot make a distinction between local and non-local traffic. This is not that different from charging extra for long-distance service, which was very common among the common-carrier phone companies before VoIP made most voice calls "too cheap to meter". It does mean that the ISP does not get to pick and choose the type of traffic they will carry, which should rule out things like DPI filtering or restrictions against running servers.

Comment Re:free choice (Score 1, Insightful) 259

Yeah, they're perfectly free to go back to dire poverty and hunger if they want.

No, they're free to provide for themselves without any help or hindrance from Apple or Pegatron. If that means "dire poverty and hunger" that is only because this is the natural state of the universe; if you want anything else you have to provide it for yourself, either individually or working together with others voluntarily for mutual benefit.

If they choose to work at Pegatron they do so because, despite what anyone else might say about the pay or conditions, they feel that this is their best option. Pegatron has no inherent responsibility to provide for anyone beyond what they mutually agreed to in the terms of employment. The workers' conditions—in the aggregate, including any who were laid off—would not be improved by Pegatron (or Apple) losing customers due to non-competitive pricing, or by losing investors due to non-competitive returns.

If really you want to improve their lot, the most effective strategies would be to increase competition for workers by reducing (not increasing!) the barriers to entry for new businesses, to encourage free trade, and to lift the restrictions on immigration to areas with higher standards of living.

Comment Re:It's not Bechdel - it's puritan test (Score 1) 282

No. Example: a scene where a woman is dressing not done in a sexually suggestive manner isn't a problem

The quote says "depicted in sexually suggestive clothing" not "dressing done in a sexually suggestive manner."

If you think it's the manner and not the clothing that matters, then you should have said "yes" not "no" because you are agreeing that the quoted criteria are stupid.

Comment Re: Not totally true (Score 0) 108

X-rated theaters still exist and are in practically every porn shop with an 'arcade.' Even today in 2016.

Where is that? We still have "adult" shops around here, but I thought they mostly survived on selling sex toys, as the internet has totally killed the retail porn market.
(Or it might just be our local puritan laws limiting retail.)

Comment Re:For the percentage impaired... (Score 1) 85

This is more a matter of how the phrase should be read, as jargon, and not how the phrase will be (mis-)understood by the general public in casual conversation.

As a writer, if you can't count on a technically-minded audience, you're (unfortunately) best served by avoiding relative multiples entirely, as well as relative percentages at or above 100%. Unlike "two times faster" or "330% faster", there is no confusion, generally speaking, about how to read "three times as fast" or "430% as fast".

As a reader, in the absence of evidence of the author's intent to the contrary, if you encounter the phrase "X times faster" or "X% faster" I believe you should treat it as equivalent to "(X+1) times as fast" or "(X+100%) as fast".

I understand that linguistic relativism is in vogue at the moment, and even agree with it to an extent. The point of having language is to communicate, after all, which implies that the meanings and customary use of phrases are not fixed in stone; they change depending on the speaker, audience, and context. However, by the same token, I think prescriptionism is warranted in cases like this one for the sake of preserving our ability to communicate clearly and concisely. Ambiguity serves no one, and we don't need another inconsistent way to say "X times as fast", whereas maintaining the regular structure of the language ("X00% = X times" and "X faster = original speed plus X", regardless of context) helps to reduce the reader's cognitive load, leaving more energy for the real content. While there is no inherently right or wrong way to design a tool, some tool designs are more fit for purpose than others, and the same is true for the tools of communication, i.e. languages.

Comment Re:I'm getting old. (Score 1) 145

I understand your concerns, but these adapters are basically just wiring and physical supports. There are hardly any electronics involved (perhaps a discrete voltage regulator, judging from the images). If you would be willing to trust a non-OEM SATA cable and mounting bracket then I wouldn't see any reason not to trust a non-OEM M.2 to SATA adapter.

There are some higher-end models which provide a full 2.5" enclosure for your M.2 drive for $20-30, if you want the extra peace of mind.

Comment Re:I'm getting old. (Score 1) 145

I get the M.2 format's advantages, but I don't understand why they wouldn't offer the same drives in SATA packaging.

If you need the SATA packaging to fit existing hardware you can get M.2 to SATA adapters for $8-10:
Oley Laptop SSD NGFF M.2 to 2.5" SATA 3 PC Converter Adapter Card
AD905A SATA III 3 to M.2 (NGFF) SSD 7+5 pin Connector Converter Adapter Card

Here's a higher-end dual-M.2 to SATA adapter with integrated hardware RAID for $40:
Ableconn ISAT-M2SR 2.5" 7mm SATA III to Dual M.2 SATA SSD Adapter with Hardward RAID

Has anyone heard of NAS or SAN devices that now feature rows of M.2 slots instead of SATA sleds?

They don't appear to be commonplace yet, but here's one example:
Qnap 4-Bay M.2 SSD NASbook with Built-In 4 Port LAN Switch

Comment Re:For the percentage impaired... (Score 1) 85

Can you link to something authoritative so I can cure my ignorance?

Sorry, I didn't find anything definitive either. However, it follows from the normal use for ratios less than unity. The only difference is the magnitude. Taking "two times" to be equivalent to "200%", and "1/2 times" (or simply "1/2") to be equivalent to "50%":

50% as fast (as the original) = 1/2 (times) as fast = 0.5 * original speed
100% as fast = one times as fast = 1 * original speed
200% as fast = two times as fast = 2 * original speed

50% faster (than the original) = 1/2 (times) faster = (0.5 * original speed) + original speed
100% faster = one times faster = (1 * original speed) + original speed = 2 * original speed
200% faster = two times faster = (2 * original speed) + original speed = 3 * original speed

The expression has two parts. The first can be either "X%" or "X times", both relative to the original amount. If the second part is "as fast" or "as much" (etc.) then this is the final result. If the second part is a relative term like "faster" or "more" then this implies addition, and the first amount, after multiplication, is the difference between the result and the original amount.

Few would disagree with the statement that "50% faster" is equivalent to "150% as fast", and not "50% as fast", but for some reason many become confused by "200% faster" when the formula is exactly the same.

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