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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Living on the command line? (networkworld.com)

LichtSpektren writes: Last month, Bryan Lunduke of Network World began a public experiment where he tried to live 30 days without using X.org, i.e. using the command line exclusively. He ended up surrendering on day 10 because "attempting to use sites such as Google+, LinkedIn or Facebook—directly from terminal-based web browsers—is a truly painful experience. It can be made to work. Really. It can. But it’s just no fun at all." The series will probably come across as amusingly posh to people that spend most of their day in the terminal, but it is interesting note that Lunduke ends by saying that after the experiment, he now chooses to manage his music, notes, and instant messaging at the command line "because, I swear, it’s just such a nice experience."

I was just curious what things Slashdotters still do on the command line that's now commonplace to do with a GUI, such as watching YouTube videos. Skip the usual ones like vim/emacs, IRC, and just about anything a sysadmin does, since those are still widely done from the terminal and too obvious to mention. Is there anybody that uses Lynx for all web browsing, including this article? Are there any professional video/image/audio producers that do most of their work at the command line? Last year, Microsoft's April Fools' joke was MS-DOS for smartphones; is there anybody that seriously uses a terminal emulator to handle their text messages and calls?

Submission + - SPAM: MH370 Pilot Flew a Suicide Route on His Home Simulator Closely Matching Final Fl 1

schwit1 writes: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was likely steered into the sea intentionally, by its own captain, in a pre-planned mass murder-suicide, a new report reveals.

In an exclusive story posted online Friday, New York magazine says that the plane’s captain, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, “conducted a simulated flight deep into the remote southern Indian ocean less than a month before the plane vanished under uncannily similar circumstances.”

Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: Physicists Combine Gold with Titanium And Quadruple Its Strength

schwit1 writes: When it comes to bone replacements, the go-to material is still titanium. Hard, wear-resistant, and compatible to the body, titanium looks like the best alternative to actual bone, maybe even better. Who knew that you could improve the ‘gold standard’ by just adding actual gold?

Rice University physicists have discovered that an alloy of titanium and gold is three to four times harder than steel, and may actually be better as a material for replacement body parts. The study, published in Science Advances , described the properties of an alloy of the two metals, a 3-to-1 mixture of titanium and gold, called Titanium-3. They found the alloy to be four times harder than titanium.

When they checked the biocompatibility and wear rate of the alloy, the researchers knew that it would rank high, since its parent metals are already biocompatible and used in medical implants. Surprisingly, Titanium-3 performed well over their expectations, actually being more biocompatible and wear resistant than pure titanium.

Gold-pressed latinum?

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds? (ucsf.edu)

giorgioarmani writes: It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us – which greatly outnumber our own cells – may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.In an article published this week in the journal BioEssays, researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.

Submission + - ARM Holdings to be taken over by Japanese firm (bbc.co.uk)

Retron writes: One of the UK's leading tech companies, ARM Holdings, has been the subject of a hostile takeover bid from the Japanese firm Softbank. The bid values the shares at £17 each, a far higher price than the £11.88 they were worth at the close on Friday.

Chips using ARM technology are used in all sorts of gadgets and devices, from washing machines to iPads.

Submission + - Attacking Ransomware By Watching The Filesystem (phys.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Ransomware — what hackers use to encrypt your computer files and demand money in exchange for freeing those contents — is an exploding global problem with few solutions, but a team of University of Florida researchers says it has developed a way to stop it dead in its tracks.

The answer, they say, lies not in keeping it out of a computer but rather in confronting it once it's there and, counterintuitively, actually letting it lock up a few files before clamping down on it.

"Our system is more of an early-warning system. It doesn't prevent the ransomware from starting ... it prevents the ransomware from completing its task ... so you lose only a couple of pictures or a couple of documents rather than everything that's on your hard drive, and it relieves you of the burden of having to pay the ransom," said Nolen Scaife, a UF doctoral student and founding member of UF's Florida Institute for Cybersecurity Research.
Scaife is part of the team that has come up with the ransomware solution, which it calls CryptoDrop.
Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-07-e...

Submission + - Why Google Stores Billions of Lines of Code in a Single Repository (acm.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Google proves that distributed version control systems can't replace centralized ones. The centralized approach to source control has served Google well for more than 16 years, and today the vast majority of Google's software assets continues to be stored in a single, shared repository.

The Google codebase includes approximately one billion files and has a history of approximately 35 million commits spanning Google's entire 18-year existence. The repository contains 86TB of data, including approximately two billion lines of code in nine million unique source files.

Submission + - Judge rules No-Fly list unconstitutional

schwit1 writes: A federal judge ruled last week that the method by which the federal government places people on the no-fly list is inherently unconstitutional, and must either be changed, or cease.

Specifically, U.S. District Judge Anna Brown said the process doesn’t give Americans on the list an effective way to challenge their inclusion. The Oregonian reports: “In a 65-page opinion issued Tuesday Brown ordered the government to come up with a new way for the 13 plaintiffs to contest their inclusion on the list that prohibits them from flying in or through U.S. airspace. The government must provide notice to the plaintiffs that they are on the roster and give the reasons for their inclusion, Brown wrote. She also ordered that the government allow the plaintiffs to submit evidence to refute the government’s suspicions.

“The decision marks a big win for the plaintiffs, all U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and the American Civil Liberties Union, which argued the case on their behalf. The plaintiffs have all been denied boarding due to their placement on the list, they argue, despite never having been charged with a terrorism-related offense.”

Submission + - C++17 Committee Draft Approved

lefticus writes: The upcoming C++17 standard has reached Committee Draft stage, having been voted on in the standards committee meeting in Oulu, Finland this Saturday. This makes C++17 now feature complete, with many new interesting features such as if initializers and structured bindings having been voted in at this meeting.

An interview with the C++ committee chair, Herb Sutter, about the status of C++17 has also been posted.

Submission + - SPAM: Britain Votes To Leave The European Union

cold fjord writes: In a national referendum of enormous consequence the people of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland have voted to leave the European Union by a margin of 51.8% to 48.2% with 95% of the votes counted in a record turnout of 72.2% of the electorate. The consequences of the U.K. leaving the E.U. will unfold over a period of years and Europeans are left wondering if Britain will be the only country to leave the E.U., or only the first. With this decision comes reports that Sinn Fein in Northern Ireland and the SNP in Scotland will be calling for dissolving their union with the United Kingdom. The future of the current Prime Minister, David Cameron, is uncertain. The British Pound has taken a beating. But Britain is now moving into a very different future from the one it appeared to have just yesterday, able to make choices independent from Brussels.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Bugs in OpenJDK project

El_programmer writes: Nowadays a lot of projects are opening their source code and letting those who are interested in the development of it edit the code. OpenJDK is no exception, programmers PVS-Studio have found a lot of interesting errors that are worth paying attention to.

OpenJDK (Open Java Development Kit) — a project for the creation and implementation of Java (Java SE) platform, which is now free and open source. The project was started in 2006, by the Sun company. The project uses multiple languages- C, C++, and Java. We are interested in the source code written in C and C++. Let's take the 9th version of OpenJDK. The code of this implementation of Java platform is available at the Mercurial repository.

During verification, the analyzer found different errors in the project including: copy-paste, bugs in the operation precedence, errors in logical expressions and in pointer handling and other bugs, which are described in detail in this article.

It's always amusing to check a project which is used and maintained by a large number of people. The better and more accurate the code is, the more safely and effectively the program will work. Those bugs we found, are another proof of the usefulness of an analyzer, as it allows the detection of such errors which would otherwise be hard to detect doing simple code review.

Submission + - Student sues police for fine after refusing Breathalyzer

schwit1 writes: A Michigan high school student who was fined when she refused to take a Breathalyzer test — even though she was only a passenger in the vehicle — has filed a federal lawsuit claiming her constitutional right to be free from unreasonable searches was violated.

The law violates Guthrie’s Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable searches, her Detroit lawyer told NBC News. “Her rights were violated when she was forced to submit to Breathalyzer to prove her innocence,” attorney Mike Rataj said. “That is not how the criminal justice system works. This is a girl who has never been in trouble before and has no criminal history.”

It can be argued that a driver has made a deal with the state, which provides roads and regulates their safe use, and must submit. She however was merely a passenger, and thus any search of her body really does require a warrant, as per the Bill of Rights.

Submission + - Court bans smart meter blueprints from public, requester sued amid terror fears (theregister.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: Phil Mocek, the sysadmin-activist at the center of a bizarre legal battle over a smart meter network in Seattle, Washington, says he never expected a simple records request to turn into a lawsuit.

"We all assume these meters simply monitor the amount of energy usage in the home," Mocek explained. "But they monitor it in real time in ways that other meters did not." When he asked Seattle City Light, a public power utility, to provide details on the designs and rollout of its smart power meter grid, he was simply hoping to find out what security safeguards the city and hardware providers Landis+Gyr and Sensus USA planned to use.

This, says Mocek, is where things started to get real odd.

After an email exchange with Seattle City Light officials, he obtained a mix of unredacted and redacted documents by the city, which he uploaded to the web – only to be told that the smart meter suppliers objected to the release of the information on the grounds that the unredacted documents would disclose their trade secrets and open the public to terrorist attacks on their infrastructure. Landis+Gyr and Sensus promptly sued the city, Mocek and Muckrock, and filed for an injunction: ultimately, the suppliers wanted the documents taken down, and the unredacted copies banned from public view.

On Thursday, a temporary restraining order was granted by the King County Superior Court in Washington – and Muckrock founder Michael Morisy confirmed the unredacted documents have been taken down pending the outcome of the case.

Submission + - ESA and Tim Peake to rent out room on ISS on AirBnB

RockDoctor writes: After their successful deployment of the inflatable broom cupboard on the International Space Station, the ESA and Tim Peake are planning to rent it out on AirBnB.

https://twitter.com/esa/status/736848338708992000

No comment on when the road there will be improved — it's unsurfaced (and un-foundationed) for the last 100+ km — but the parking for your vehicles could easily be described as "spacy". Driving up there — particularly in a convertible car — is literally breathtaking. You'll feel all the pressures lifting from you.

I'm writing like an advertising agent. I'd better commit sepukku with an IBM mechanical keyboard.

Submission + - HP 12c, Thirty-Five Years of The Calculator that Never Dies

dkatana writes: Two revolutionary computer products were born in 1981: the IBM PC, that brought computing to the masses, now a museum piece, and the HP 12c, a financial calculator that has been one of the most successful products of our generation.

The HP 12c was designed by a team led by Dennis Harms, a former Iowa farm boy, under orders of Bill Hewlett. Now, thirty-five years later, it is still selling in its original form and is used by over 100 million people worldwide.

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