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Submission + - HAARP Comes Alive Once Again

Freshly Exhumed writes: News on Hackaday today informs that the famous HAARP antenna array is to be brought back into service for experiments by the University of Alaska. Built in the 1990s for the US Air Forceâ(TM)s High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program, the array is a 40-acre site containing a phased array of 180 HF antennas and their associated high power transmitters. Its purpose it to conduct research on charged particles in the upper atmosphere.

Submission + - Is Vodafone's new broadband service a man-in-the-middle attack? (vodafone.co.uk)

Duncan J Murray writes: Vodafone's recent entry into the competitive broadband ADSL and fibre market in the UK has been met with accusations that they are partaking in a man in a middle attack by providing certificates from contentcontrol.vodafone.co.uk. bored writes "Vodafone are performing a man-in-the-middle attack... Rather than subverting a wifi router, they have a proxy server which is intercepting your encrypted data requests, making the connection to the encrypted endpoint itself and getting you to send your requests to the Vodafone proxy server...."

Vodafone broadband also seems to be falling foul noscript's Application Boundary Enforcer designed to prevent DNS rebinding attacks, requiring system ABE rules to be disabled to access https addresses.

So far vodafone have responded by suggesting a security exception is created for each occurrence, and another reply from vodafone respond "I've double checked this with our Broadband team and this is how our routers are set up, we're unable to change any settings at our end."

Though we should not attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity, is this unwittingly compromising the security of vodafone broadband users?

Comment Re:Only a penny a page, duplex? (Score 1) 3

I based the estimate on $5o for a cartridge that prints an average of 3,000 pages. A color laser would be nice, but as you say, far more expensive both in up-front costs and toner. And changing toner in a color printer is a PITA, at least the ones at work were.

Submission + - Techdirt asks judge to throw out suit over "Inventor of E-mail" (arstechnica.com)

walterbyrd writes: Michael Masnick, who founded the popular Techdirt blog, filed a motion today asking for a defamation lawsuit against him to be thrown out. Masnick was sued last month by Shiva Ayyadurai, a scientist and entrepreneur who claims to have invented e-mail in 1978 at a medical college in New Jersey.

In his motion, Masnick claims that Ayyadurai "is seeking to use the muzzle of a defamation action to silence those who question his claim to historical fame."

Submission + - SAP "named-user" license fees are due even for indirect users, court says (networkworld.com)

ahbond writes: Beverage firm Diageo could be on the hook for an additional £55 million in license fees because it gave Salesforce users access to data held in an SAP system. SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

"Business are signing up to an open-ended direct debit which they can't withdraw from. It's really not surprising that many are now choosing the certainty and low cost of Google and Amazon Web Services"

Comment Re:Well, duh! (Score 1) 140

The problem is that Facebook T&Cs, as well as granting Facebook an almost unlimited license to anything you upload also includes a clause that you agree to indemnify them against this kind of claim. So, while you might be able to take Facebook to court and win if they took a video your friend uploaded of you and sold it, they would then be able to turn around immediately and sue your friend for whatever amount the court awarded you.

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