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Comment Re:50% is nothing without a confidence interval (Score 1) 140

There are about 500 nuclear power plants worldwide and 24 years for this prediction to come true. There is a 1 in 24,000 chance that a given plant will have a Chernobyl event this year or a 1 in 48 that any plant will have a Chernobyl disaster this year. Both those numbers seem remarkably high and I agree that they are getting pretty liberal with their numbers to get to a 50% chance.

Comment Re: Bullshit (Score 0) 143

Face it, no one in their right mind would want a traceable record of their visit to a prostitute.

Which is quite impossible to avoid when you use a "call girl" and don't pick up a "hooker" from the street.

How is that impossible, you can meet at a hotel you paid cash for, call her on a throw away phone or a pay phone. Where is the personal information leak?

Comment Re:Fastest in what way? (Score 1) 183

It's not hard to build a dragster that can outrun a Bugatti Veyron in a quarter mile but I wouldn't call one faster than a Veyron until it beat it around a track with corners.

A Veryon did the 1/4 mile in 9.7 seconds, if you go to any drag strip there are very few street legal cars that are going that fast. It's not as easy a putting a turbo or nitrous on a stock car and ripping out the extra weight.

Submission + - New Guccifer 2.0 docs on "wobbly" Democrats (thehill.com)

An anonymous reader writes: New documents from DNC hacker Guccifer 2.0 highlight "wobbly" Democrats on the Iran deal and why they won't be using Philidelphia's Holiday Inn ("We are not Chingy").

Submission + - Infants Have Gender Identity (sciencedaily.com)

Texmaize writes: It is in vogue today to pretend that gender is fluid and a mere social construct. Some parents even gleefully go out of their way to give their children toys that traditionally are for the other gender, in hopes of making them......better? A study published in Infant and development suggests that babies seem to know better than some confused adults.

"Children as young as 9 months-old prefer to play with toys specific to their own gender, according to a new study. The research suggests the possibility that boys and girls follow different developmental trajectories with respect to selection of gender-typed toys and that there is both a biological and a developmental-environmental components to the sex differences seen in object preferences."

Submission + - DoJ uses obsolete software to subvert FOIA requests (theguardian.com)

Bruce66423 writes: An MIT PhD student has filed a suit in Federal court alleging that the use of a 21yo IBM green screen controlled search software to search the Department of Justice databases in response to Freedom of information requests constitutes an deliberate failure to provide the data that should be being produced

Submission + - It's a federal crime to visit a website after being told not to vis (washingtonpost.com)

Okian Warrior writes: he U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit has handed down a very important decision on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, Facebook v. Vachani which decision is quite troubling. Its reasoning appears to be very broad — it says that if you tell people not to visit your website, and they do it anyway knowing you disapprove, they’re committing a federal crime of accessing your computer without authorization.

Submission + - Are fat people less intelligent than thin? (dailymail.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: Fat people are less intelligent than people with a normal weight, a provocative study claims.

Overweight men and women have less grey and white matter in key areas of the brain.

They also have greater impulsivity and ‘altered reward processing’, the study said.

The researchers said that their findings could explain why overweight people make poor diet choices — they do not have the mental capacity to control themselves.

Nor are they able to stop themselves from making poor choices when the do eat something.

The theory is likely to prove controversial as weight loss campaigners have emphasised that each individual has different reasons for their struggle with their body.

Submission + - Honda Unveils First Hybrid Motor Without Heavy Rare Earth Metals (engadget.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Honda has unveiled its new hybrid motor this week that doesn't use heavy rare earth metals like dysprosium and terbium — though it still does contain neodymium. The motor was co-developed alongside Daido Steel and will use their magnets in replace of the rare earth metals because they cost 10 percent less and weigh 8 percent less. Honda is the first automaker to develop a hybrid motor that doesn't use heavy rare earth metals. The company says the new engines will reduce its reliance on the metals that are primarily supplied by China. They're expected to make their debut in the compact Freed minivan this fall, a vehicle that is already on the road in Asia.

Submission + - SEC Investigating Tesla For Possible Securities-Law Breach (usatoday.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Tesla hasn't had the best month so far as not one, not two, but a total of three crashes have been reported with the car's Autopilot self-driving system engaged at the time — two of which resulted in fatalities. In addition, The Wall Street Journal is reporting today that the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating whether Tesla violated securities law by failing to disclose more quickly a fatal accident in Florida in May involving a Tesla Model S that was in self-driving mode. The SEC didn't comment on the report, and Tesla issued a statement saying it has "not received any communication from the SEC regarding this issue." As for the Autopilot crash that was reported today, the driver said he activated Autopilot mode at the beginning of his trip. Tesla is looking into the crash and has yet to confirm whether or not Autopilot was a factor. Tesla CEO Elon Musk teased a "Top Secret Tesla Masterplan, Part 2" via Twitter that he is "Hoping to publish later this week."

Submission + - Two anti-fracking/anti-oil industry environmental papers retracted (retractionwatch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two environmental papers, one claiming increased air pollution near fracking sites and the second claiming that the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill caused air contamination, have now both been retracted because of “crucial mistakes.”

According to the corresponding author of both papers, Kim Anderson at Oregon State University, the journal plans to publish new versions of both papers in the next few days. In the case of the fracking paper, the conclusions have been reversed — the original paper stated pollution levels exceeded limits set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for lifetime cancer risk, but the corrected data set the risks below EPA levels.

The fracking paper received some media attention when it was released, as it tapped into long-standing concerns about the environmental dangers of hydraulic fracturing (fracking), which extracts natural gas from the earth. A press release that accompanied the paper quoted Anderson as warning: “Air pollution from fracking operations may pose an under-recognized health hazard to people living near them.”

Both papers, published in Environmental Science and Technology, were retracted on the same day (June 29), both due to mistakes in reported levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pollutants released from burning oil, gas, and other organic matter.

They say that the errors were due to an “honest spreadsheet error.”

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