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Submission + - Are you liable if you run a public Wi-Fi hotspot? (arstechnica.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: If you run a public Wi-Fi service, can you be held responsible if someone uses it to infringe copyright, defame someone or commit a crime? Ars Technica examines the situation under English law on intermediary liability, as well as looking at data protection law and obligations (or not) to store traffic data for law enforcement.

According to Ars, much publicised "guidance" for would-be Wi-Fi operators indicates that an operator would be liable, but the legal experts who spoke to Ars are far less convinced.

Submission + - SPAM: New Jeep hack proves cars still exposed

lkcl writes: When automotive security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek take the stage Thursday morning (August 4) at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas, they will outline new methods of CAN message injection. The two researchers who now work for Uber’s Advanced Technology Center will demonstrate how to physically seize control of the braking, steering, and acceleration systems in a vehicle.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - US Air Force Declares F-35A Ready For Combat (defensenews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Air Force on Tuesday declared its first squadron of F-35As ready for battle, 15 years after Lockheed Martin won the contract to make the plane. The milestone means that the service can now send its first operational F-35 formation — the 34th Fighter Squadron located at Hill Air Force Base, Utah — into combat operations anywhere in the world. The service, which plans to buy 1,763 F-35As, is the single-largest customer of the joint strike fighter program, which also includes the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy and a host of governments worldwide. "Given the national security strategy, we need it," [Air Combat Command (ACC) head Gen. Herbert "Hawk" Carlisle] said. "You look at the potential adversaries out there, or the potential environments where we have to operate this airplane, the attributes that the F-35 brings — the ability to penetrate defensive airspace, the ability to deliver precision munitions with a sensor suite that fuses data from multiple information sources — is something our nation needs." Carlisle said in July that even though he would feel comfortable sending the F-35 to a fight as soon as the jet becomes operational, ACC has formed a “deliberate path” where the aircraft would deploy in stages: first to Red Flag exercises, then as a “theater security package” to Europe and the Asia-Pacific. The fighter probably won’t deploy to the Middle East to fight the Islamic State group any earlier than 2017, he said, but if a combatant commander asked for the capability, “I’d send them down in a heartbeat because they’re very, very good.”

Submission + - Genetically modified mosquitoes released in Cayman Islands (wral.com)

Okian Warrior writes: The first wave of genetically modified mosquitoes were released Wednesday in the Cayman Islands as part of a new effort to control the insect that spreads Zika and other viruses, officials in the British Island territory said.

Genetically altered male mosquitoes, which don't bite but are expected to mate with females to produce offspring that die before reaching adulthood, were released in the West Bay area of Grand Cayman Island, according to a joint statement from the Cayman Islands Mosquito Research and Control Unit and British biotech firm Oxitec.

[Note from submitter: This November Florida will hold a referendum to decide whether to release genetically modified mosquitos to combat Zika]

[Also, here's some background on the process.]

Submission + - Gawker Founder Nick Denton Files For Bankruptcy (nydailynews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Gawker's founder Nick Denton filed for personal bankruptcy Monday after a Florida appeals court refused to give him an emergency order that would block wrestler Hulk Hogan from collecting on a $140 million jury verdict. The District Court of Appeal in Lakeland, Fla., denied a request by Gawker and Denton to stay a ruling by lower court judge Pamela Campbell — who said Hogan could start collecting on his award immediately. But declaring bankruptcy will give Denton protection from collectors including Hogan, whose real name is Terry Bollea. In the filing, Denton says he has assets of $10 to $50 million and liabilities of $100 to $500 million. His debts includes $125 million that he owes to Hogan, an $11.5 million loan that he took out on June 10 from Silicon Valley Bank, a $50,000 loan he took from his 401(k) at Gawker and his Time Warner Cable bill for $120.88. The jury's March verdict was the result of Gawker's decision to publish a tape on the internet of Hogan having sex with a friend's wife. The former WWF star said it was an invasion of his privacy. Gawker filed for bankruptcy shortly after the jury's verdict, but Denton resisted, asking the bankruptcy court to protect him as part of the process. The federal court refused. Now that the Florida courts have opened the door for Hogan to start collecting from Denton, he is expected to follow Gawker into federal bankruptcy court in lower Manhattan.

Submission + - Inside the BlackHat Las Vegas NoC where even the Zeus trojan is cool (theregister.co.uk)

mask.of.sanity writes: Neil Wyler and Bart Stump are responsible for managing what is probably the world’s most hostile wireless network. They are part of a team of 23 who run the network operations centre at the Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas taking place this week, and reveal how they need to loosen their normally strict defensive rulebooks for the conference networks to prevent only the worst attacks from taking place.

Submission + - DoJ uses obsolete software to subvert FOIA requests (theguardian.com)

Bruce66423 writes: An MIT PhD student has filed a suit in Federal court alleging that the use of a 21yo IBM green screen controlled search software to search the Department of Justice databases in response to Freedom of information requests constitutes an deliberate failure to provide the data that should be being produced

Submission + - It's a federal crime to visit a website after being told not to vis (washingtonpost.com)

Okian Warrior writes: he U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit has handed down a very important decision on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, Facebook v. Vachani which decision is quite troubling. Its reasoning appears to be very broad — it says that if you tell people not to visit your website, and they do it anyway knowing you disapprove, they’re committing a federal crime of accessing your computer without authorization.

Submission + - SPAM: Are fat people less intelligent than thin?

schwit1 writes: Fat people are less intelligent than people with a normal weight, a provocative study claims.

Overweight men and women have less grey and white matter in key areas of the brain.

They also have greater impulsivity and ‘altered reward processing’, the study said.

The researchers said that their findings could explain why overweight people make poor diet choices — they do not have the mental capacity to control themselves.

Nor are they able to stop themselves from making poor choices when the do eat something.

The theory is likely to prove controversial as weight loss campaigners have emphasised that each individual has different reasons for their struggle with their body.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Honda Unveils First Hybrid Motor Without Heavy Rare Earth Metals (engadget.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Honda has unveiled its new hybrid motor this week that doesn't use heavy rare earth metals like dysprosium and terbium — though it still does contain neodymium. The motor was co-developed alongside Daido Steel and will use their magnets in replace of the rare earth metals because they cost 10 percent less and weigh 8 percent less. Honda is the first automaker to develop a hybrid motor that doesn't use heavy rare earth metals. The company says the new engines will reduce its reliance on the metals that are primarily supplied by China. They're expected to make their debut in the compact Freed minivan this fall, a vehicle that is already on the road in Asia.

Submission + - SEC Investigating Tesla For Possible Securities-Law Breach (usatoday.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Tesla hasn't had the best month so far as not one, not two, but a total of three crashes have been reported with the car's Autopilot self-driving system engaged at the time — two of which resulted in fatalities. In addition, The Wall Street Journal is reporting today that the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating whether Tesla violated securities law by failing to disclose more quickly a fatal accident in Florida in May involving a Tesla Model S that was in self-driving mode. The SEC didn't comment on the report, and Tesla issued a statement saying it has "not received any communication from the SEC regarding this issue." As for the Autopilot crash that was reported today, the driver said he activated Autopilot mode at the beginning of his trip. Tesla is looking into the crash and has yet to confirm whether or not Autopilot was a factor. Tesla CEO Elon Musk teased a "Top Secret Tesla Masterplan, Part 2" via Twitter that he is "Hoping to publish later this week."

Submission + - AT&T Wants $100 Million From California Taxpayers For Aging DSL (dslreports.com)

An anonymous reader writes: AT&T is asking California taxpayers to give them $100 million so that AT&T can provide several parts of the state with unreliable, slow and expensive DSL service. As Steve Blum’s blog notes, under Assembly Bill 2130 (written by AT&T lobbyists), AT&T would receive $100 million from state taxpayers. In return, AT&T would only need to provide 10 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload and would have little to no oversight over whether the $100 million is even being used for the DSL service. According to Blum, AB 2130 would:

Submission + - Can living in total darkness for 5 days "reset" the visual system? (nautil.us)

the_newsbeagle writes: That's what one neuroscientist is aiming to find out. He wants to put patients with a type of amblyopia, the vision problem commonly called lazy eye, into the dark for 5 days. His hypothesis: When they emerge, their brains' visual cortices will be temporarily "plastic" and changeable, and may begin to process the visual signals from their bad eyes correctly. Before he could do this study, though, he had to do a test run to figure out logistics. So he himself lived in a pitch black room for 5 days. One finding: Eating ravioli in the dark is hard.

Submission + - Sexual health clinic accidentally publishes HIV status of 800 patients (rt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "A sexual health clinic in London has accidentally disclosed the HIV positive status of nearly 800 patients, it has emerged."

What were these records even doing on a computer a) in the clear and b) connected to the Internet ?

Submission + - SourceForge assumes ownership of GIMP For Win, wraps installer in adware (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It appears that SourceForge is assuming control of all projects that appear "abandoned." In a blog update on their site, they responded saying in part "There has recently been some report that the GIMP-Win project on SourceForge has been hijacked; this project was actually abandoned over 18 months ago, and SourceForge has stepped-in to keep this project current. "

SourceForge is now offering "to establish a program to enable users and developers to help us remove misleading and confusing ads."

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