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Submission + - "HP pre-programmed failure date of non-HP ink cartridges in its printers" (myce.com)

An anonymous reader writes: HP has programmed a failure date for non-HP / private label ink cartridges in its printers. Users around the world started to complain on the 13th of September this year that their printer rejected their non-HP cartridges. HP claimed that a firmware update was the culprit, but also printers who never received an update since they were unpacked rejected the cartridges starting at that particular date.

Submission + - NYC Threatens To Sue Verizon Over FiOS Shortfalls (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: New York City officials yesterday notified Verizon that the company is in default of an agreement to bring fiber connections to all households in the city and could file a lawsuit against the company. The road to a potential lawsuit has been a long one. In June 2015, New York released an audit that found Verizon failed to meet a commitment to extend FiOS to every household in the five boroughs by June 2014. City officials and Verizon have been trying to resolve the matter since then with no success, as Verizon says that it hasn't actually broken the agreement. The default letter (full text) sent yesterday by the city Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications (DoITT) says Verizon has failed to pass all residential buildings in the city with fiber. As of October 2015, there were at least 38,551 addresses where Verizon hadn't fulfilled installation service requests that were more than a year old, the letter said. "Moreover, Verizon improperly reduced, from $50 million to $15 million, the performance bond required [by] the Agreement on the basis of Verizon's incorrect representations that Verizon had met the prescribed deployment schedule, when in fact it had not," the letter said. City officials demanded that Verizon restore the bond and wants a response within 30 days. The default letter also accuses Verizon of failing to make records related to its provision of cable service available to the city during its audit. "Officials say they could sue Verizon unless the carrier shows clear plans for stepping up installations," and that the notice is the first step in that process, The Wall Street Journal reported. The citywide fiber agreement lets NYC seek monetary damages from Verizon if it fails to deliver on the fiber promises.

Submission + - Surveillance Capabilities of Future Employee ID Badges

Presto Vivace writes: Bosses can take biometrics of employees with an ID badge that monitors motion and listens.

In the Washington Post, Jeff Heath tells the story of Humanyze, an employee analytics company that took technology developed at MIT and spun it into identification badges meant to hang off employees' necks via a lanyard. The badge has two microphones that do real-time voice analysis, with sensors that follow where you are and motion detectors that record how much you move while working.

A report in Bloomberg reveals the origins of the company. In 2014, 57 stock and bond traders "lent their bodies to science" by allowing MIT finance professor Andrew Lo to monitor their actions in a conference room. The study subjects were given a $3 million risk limit and told to make money in various markets. Lo discovered that the successful subjects were "emotional athletes. Their bodies swiftly respond to stressful situations and relax when calm returns, leaving them primed for the next challenge." Traders who encountered problems "were hounded by their mistakes and remained emotionally charged, as measured by their heart rate and other markers such as cortisol levels, even after the volatility subsided."

Submission + - Is media coverage of the F-35 fighter overly negative?

Rei writes: The F-35 Lightning II, the most expensive weapons project in history, has often received criticism in the media, including extensively on Slashdot, for being overbudget, behind schedule and underperforming. But is this coverage justifiable? Writing today in Forbes, defense analyst and industry consultant Loren Thompson takes the media to task for only reporting negatives on the F-35 program. With the program now having delivered 200 planes and each batch being cheaper than the last, Lockheed has now further cut their estimated cost per plane to just 30% more than upgraded legacy aircraft like the F/A-18 Super Hornet. He also cites the preference of pilots for the F-35 over legacy systems, quoting officers and pilots finding it demoralizing trying to engage the F-35 with legacy aircraft. "We turned hot, drove for about 30 seconds and we were dead, just like that. We never even saw [the F-35] .. It can feel like you are out there with a blindfold on."

Without being able to acquire a high-frequency radar lock, detection methods can be limited to low frequency radar, which is large and yields a noisy return poorly suited for targeting; and IRST, which can clearly see and target the F-35, but only through a very narrow aperture. Potential adversaries such as Russia have been working to upgrade their air defenses specifically against these emerging threats, such as the Sunflower radar and the S-500 missile defense system; however, their effectiveness in being able to provide a capable kill chain against targets like the F-22 and F-35 is in dispute.

Submission + - Are you liable if you run a public Wi-Fi hotspot? (arstechnica.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: If you run a public Wi-Fi service, can you be held responsible if someone uses it to infringe copyright, defame someone or commit a crime? Ars Technica examines the situation under English law on intermediary liability, as well as looking at data protection law and obligations (or not) to store traffic data for law enforcement.

According to Ars, much publicised "guidance" for would-be Wi-Fi operators indicates that an operator would be liable, but the legal experts who spoke to Ars are far less convinced.

Submission + - SPAM: New Jeep hack proves cars still exposed

lkcl writes: When automotive security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek take the stage Thursday morning (August 4) at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas, they will outline new methods of CAN message injection. The two researchers who now work for Uber’s Advanced Technology Center will demonstrate how to physically seize control of the braking, steering, and acceleration systems in a vehicle.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - US Air Force Declares F-35A Ready For Combat (defensenews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Air Force on Tuesday declared its first squadron of F-35As ready for battle, 15 years after Lockheed Martin won the contract to make the plane. The milestone means that the service can now send its first operational F-35 formation — the 34th Fighter Squadron located at Hill Air Force Base, Utah — into combat operations anywhere in the world. The service, which plans to buy 1,763 F-35As, is the single-largest customer of the joint strike fighter program, which also includes the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy and a host of governments worldwide. "Given the national security strategy, we need it," [Air Combat Command (ACC) head Gen. Herbert "Hawk" Carlisle] said. "You look at the potential adversaries out there, or the potential environments where we have to operate this airplane, the attributes that the F-35 brings — the ability to penetrate defensive airspace, the ability to deliver precision munitions with a sensor suite that fuses data from multiple information sources — is something our nation needs." Carlisle said in July that even though he would feel comfortable sending the F-35 to a fight as soon as the jet becomes operational, ACC has formed a “deliberate path” where the aircraft would deploy in stages: first to Red Flag exercises, then as a “theater security package” to Europe and the Asia-Pacific. The fighter probably won’t deploy to the Middle East to fight the Islamic State group any earlier than 2017, he said, but if a combatant commander asked for the capability, “I’d send them down in a heartbeat because they’re very, very good.”

Submission + - Genetically modified mosquitoes released in Cayman Islands (wral.com)

Okian Warrior writes: The first wave of genetically modified mosquitoes were released Wednesday in the Cayman Islands as part of a new effort to control the insect that spreads Zika and other viruses, officials in the British Island territory said.

Genetically altered male mosquitoes, which don't bite but are expected to mate with females to produce offspring that die before reaching adulthood, were released in the West Bay area of Grand Cayman Island, according to a joint statement from the Cayman Islands Mosquito Research and Control Unit and British biotech firm Oxitec.

[Note from submitter: This November Florida will hold a referendum to decide whether to release genetically modified mosquitos to combat Zika]

[Also, here's some background on the process.]

Submission + - Gawker Founder Nick Denton Files For Bankruptcy (nydailynews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Gawker's founder Nick Denton filed for personal bankruptcy Monday after a Florida appeals court refused to give him an emergency order that would block wrestler Hulk Hogan from collecting on a $140 million jury verdict. The District Court of Appeal in Lakeland, Fla., denied a request by Gawker and Denton to stay a ruling by lower court judge Pamela Campbell — who said Hogan could start collecting on his award immediately. But declaring bankruptcy will give Denton protection from collectors including Hogan, whose real name is Terry Bollea. In the filing, Denton says he has assets of $10 to $50 million and liabilities of $100 to $500 million. His debts includes $125 million that he owes to Hogan, an $11.5 million loan that he took out on June 10 from Silicon Valley Bank, a $50,000 loan he took from his 401(k) at Gawker and his Time Warner Cable bill for $120.88. The jury's March verdict was the result of Gawker's decision to publish a tape on the internet of Hogan having sex with a friend's wife. The former WWF star said it was an invasion of his privacy. Gawker filed for bankruptcy shortly after the jury's verdict, but Denton resisted, asking the bankruptcy court to protect him as part of the process. The federal court refused. Now that the Florida courts have opened the door for Hogan to start collecting from Denton, he is expected to follow Gawker into federal bankruptcy court in lower Manhattan.

Submission + - Inside the BlackHat Las Vegas NoC where even the Zeus trojan is cool (theregister.co.uk)

mask.of.sanity writes: Neil Wyler and Bart Stump are responsible for managing what is probably the world’s most hostile wireless network. They are part of a team of 23 who run the network operations centre at the Black Hat hacking conference in Las Vegas taking place this week, and reveal how they need to loosen their normally strict defensive rulebooks for the conference networks to prevent only the worst attacks from taking place.

Submission + - DoJ uses obsolete software to subvert FOIA requests (theguardian.com)

Bruce66423 writes: An MIT PhD student has filed a suit in Federal court alleging that the use of a 21yo IBM green screen controlled search software to search the Department of Justice databases in response to Freedom of information requests constitutes an deliberate failure to provide the data that should be being produced

Submission + - It's a federal crime to visit a website after being told not to vis (washingtonpost.com)

Okian Warrior writes: he U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit has handed down a very important decision on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, Facebook v. Vachani which decision is quite troubling. Its reasoning appears to be very broad — it says that if you tell people not to visit your website, and they do it anyway knowing you disapprove, they’re committing a federal crime of accessing your computer without authorization.

Submission + - SPAM: Are fat people less intelligent than thin?

schwit1 writes: Fat people are less intelligent than people with a normal weight, a provocative study claims.

Overweight men and women have less grey and white matter in key areas of the brain.

They also have greater impulsivity and ‘altered reward processing’, the study said.

The researchers said that their findings could explain why overweight people make poor diet choices — they do not have the mental capacity to control themselves.

Nor are they able to stop themselves from making poor choices when the do eat something.

The theory is likely to prove controversial as weight loss campaigners have emphasised that each individual has different reasons for their struggle with their body.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Honda Unveils First Hybrid Motor Without Heavy Rare Earth Metals (engadget.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Honda has unveiled its new hybrid motor this week that doesn't use heavy rare earth metals like dysprosium and terbium — though it still does contain neodymium. The motor was co-developed alongside Daido Steel and will use their magnets in replace of the rare earth metals because they cost 10 percent less and weigh 8 percent less. Honda is the first automaker to develop a hybrid motor that doesn't use heavy rare earth metals. The company says the new engines will reduce its reliance on the metals that are primarily supplied by China. They're expected to make their debut in the compact Freed minivan this fall, a vehicle that is already on the road in Asia.

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