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Comment Re: Correcting myself (Score 1) 730

You should be aware that you don't need to be an engineer to perform most work. The exceptions where you do need to be an engineer are things like designing industrial machinery and bridges.

Or medium- to high-voltage electrical equipment, which is what anyone claiming to be an "electrical engineer" is asserting that they're competent to do.

Really, it should be required for anything where poor design can negatively impact the public. At a minimum, that should include safety-critical things like the software running on medical equipment, but I would argue that the scope should be much broader, e.g. by holding IoT device makers accountable for their product's lack of security.

Comment Re: Correcting myself (Score 1) 730

So because of falling bridges, you can't solder your own radio?

That's a strawman argument. You can solder your own radio all you want, obviously.

What you can't do is offer your radio-building services to the public, claiming that your expertise as an engineer means they can trust that the radios you create will be (a) electrically safe (which is an issue once you're talking about stuff with more transmission power than a cellphone or walkie-talkie) and (b) comply with FCC regulations.

such for specific projects rather than for extremely vague words such as "engineer" in a broad sweep?

Except for low-voltage electronics (that have only become prevalent relatively recently -- i.e., in the least few decades), the vast majority of things engineers do are safety-critical! Claiming to be an "electrical engineer" is claiming to be competent to design things like high-voltage electrical substations, or (if you want consumer product examples) at least cathode ray tubes, microwave ovens or switching power supplies -- i.e., stuff that actually can kill people if someone screws up the design. It's not just about insignificant shit like integrated circuits and PCBs.

Comment Re: Correcting myself (Score 1) 730

and saying "I'm am engineer" to lend his letter more weoght.

AND THAT'S THE PROBLEM!

If you haven't proven yourself to be competent (e.g. by earning the license), you don't deserve to have more weight lent to your opinion. Claiming to be something you're not in order to gain advantage is fraud.

Comment Re:It's true (Score 2) 286

Pixar was unique in Silicon Valley companies in that we had deadlines that could not move. The film had to be in theaters before Christmas, etc. I'd see employees families come to Pixar to have dinner with them. I took the technical director training but decided to stay in studio tools, first because Pixar needed better software more than they needed another TD, and second because of the crazy hours.

Comment Re:I like functions... (Score 1) 417

It's quite a bit more than that, at least if you're talking about pure functional programming. You also have to get rid of most all of your old notions of flow control. Imperative programming is about defining sequences of steps, some of which are conditional. Functional programming is all done with nested transformations; there are no sequential steps, there are no branches, there is no iteration.

If you think about it, those are inevitable consequences of the constraints I mentioned. However, it's good that you highlighted them.

If this sounds freakish and impossible to someone raised on imperative programming paradigms... yes, it is. Functional programming requires thinking in an entirely new way.

Yep, both recursion and constructs like map/filter are incredibly useful (even in procedural/OO languages) once you get the hang of them.

Comment Re:I like functions... (Score 3, Insightful) 417

Yes, it means your functions aren't allowed to have side effects (i.e., all parameters are passed by value and the only result is the value returned to the caller).

Personally, I like it because it's a good way to manage complexity -- kind of like the encapsulation of object-oriented programming, except applied to the verbs instead of the nouns.

Comment Re:No brainer (Score 4, Insightful) 174

The other thing which bugs me is the white washing of old news articles how often that trick gets pulled, I might personally remember an event but find the contemporary records are missing that happens a lot especially in Politics when a past stance becomes embarrassing and then you get told black was white...

This is the single most important reason there could ever be!

Comment Re: The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 307

If you look in the FEMA site, they say that they provide gramts to perform repairs not covered by insurance. And no, they don't do a needs test. Now, the typical rich person does not let their insurance lapse just so that they can get a FEMA grant. Because such a grant is no sure thing. They also point out that SBA loans are the main source of assistance following a disaster. You get a break on interest, but you have to pay them back.

Comment Re: The problem with your explanation (Score 1) 307

I understand your point about view land being desirable even though it's a flood risk. I live a mile or so from the Hayward fault. But I have California's risk pool earthquake insurance. The government wouldn't be paying me except from a fund that I've already paid into. I imagine that the government does pay some rich people in similar situations, but as far as I'm aware disaster funds go to the States from the federal government and should not in general become a form of rich people's welfare. Maybe you can find some direct evidence to show me that would make the situation more clear.

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