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Comment Re:One can hope (Score 1) 113

I like Red Hat and I appreciate all they've done for open-source in the enterprise, but the desktopification of core Linux aspects is a bad thing.

Uh you realize Red Hat only has one little side project for workstations and it's essentially the server version with a GUI and a cheaper license? Fedora is just their testbed, they don't care about the desktop. For me it's pretty clear that the core feature of systemd is resource management for containers and other forms of light virtualization. If you run a dedicated server, you don't need it. If you use a hypervisor and full VMs you don't need it. If you want to "app-ify" your servers with Docker then systemd is the management tool around it. It's a huge selling point to cloud providers which is core business for Red Hat. They're not doing it to compete with Linux Mint...

Comment Re: He cheated OTHER players (Score 2) 223

The players cheated.

They did not mark any cards, they noticed a flaw that could be used as a mark. No rule of the casino was broken, they're nullifying it because state law says the presence of marked cards means the game is not lawfully played and thus void regardless of whose fault that is. But this means that all games played with this deck should be declared void, every win and every loss. Otherwise you're saying the casino can write the values on the back of the card, they win it was a fair game but you win and they call foul. So I'm actually with Ivey on this one, he's played with the same deck under the same rules as other players but they're cancelling just his games because he won. That's not a legally sound reasoning.

Comment Re:Internet access in Cuba (Score 1) 53

The cost of access has dropped to $1.50/hour, but that's a lot of money in a country where the average monthly income is $25.

Then maybe it's a good idea to do something about the latter instead of the former... I've paid more than that back in the dial-up days and that wasn't on an island that doesn't have any cheap ways to connect to the rest of the world.

Comment Re:Busses, Street Sweepers and Garbage Trucks (Score 1) 54

They drive the same route day after day, they don't need to go fast, they are either owned by the city or by companies that have major relationships with the city so they can avoid major regulatory hurdles. These are the obvious first adopters of driverless technology.

No, but buses are big and most needed during rush hour. The moment something doesn't work you're likely to inconvenience a lot of people on the bus and on the same road. Garbage trucks are better, but usually noisy so people want collection in daytime with other traffic and you'd need a lot of technology to automate emptying the containers to really automate it. I think sweeper cars would be perfect, nobody would care if they drive at 10 mph with the yellow warning lights say 01-04 AM, if they get stuck or have a breakdown you have time to send a mop-up crew to collect them before the morning rush.

Comment Re:Top priority? Always? (Score 1) 114

If your companies top priority is to keep data secure, they how/why did you get hacked. They always say that, but clearly that is not the Top Priority

I see you're doing your part by not using dangerous apostrophes where they are needed!

Implicit in any company's statement that security is their top priority is the large bundle of compromises that don't go away whether or not that is your top priority. They could make the data perfectly secure by disconnecting the servers and putting them in a bank vault. They could make sure the data can't be breached by simply destroying all of it. See?

Security can be your Top Priority, but it has to be done in the context of things like still making it available to users across the internet. Doing it while not going bankrupt. Making the service competitively priced so that it can actually be afforded and put to work.

They could have said that the system could only be used on equipment they ship to their clients, connected to the back end through a hardware-based dedicated VPN with biometrics, dongles, and constant nagging by three-factor comms surrounding every time someone hits the enter key ... and of course nobody could or would want to use the system or pay the monthly fee needed to keep something like that alive.

They may very well put security at a higher priority than chipping away at a long list of UX updates, performance under load, documentation, multi-language support, and a thousand other things. Doesn't mean that doing so means they'll be perfect in their security results. Ever run a business like that? No? Give it a whirl. Make security your top priority, and then start paying attention to what that decision means in real life - including in your ability to get and retain customers during that balancing act.

Comment Re:There will be no train (Score 1) 369

"Now add in 90 minutes at the airport before and after which don't exist on trains. Now add in the extra pollution and carbon usage of the planes. Now add in lower prices because rail is cheaper to run and uses less gas. Now add in the lower congestion at airports because some percentage is now using rail. You end up with a trip that's cheaper, barely if at all longer, more comfortable, less polluting, and improves things for everyone else too. I'm very glad to have voted for it."

Extending the rail between LAX and Union Station would be a hell of a lot cheaper, disrupt far fewer neighborhoods (and the court battles have only just started to rumble as track approaches the San Fernando Valley). And it would be a hell of a lot cheaper to streamline security.

Further, Amtrak suggests one arrive at least 30 mins prior to train boarding. Earlier for busy stations. The train will be more expensive than air, will cost immensely more to build than we were told and displace a *LOT* of lower income homes. I'm very glad to have voted against it.

Comment Re:That's not how it works... (Score 1) 201

That's a broken financial model. The intersection of people with the capabilities, ideas, enthusiasm, and available time is extremely small. Actually, the highly skilled people are least likely to be available because they are most likely to be working already. My apparently crazy idea is that we need better financial models first. My favorite pipe dream is a kind of a crowd-funding model around clear project proposals.

No, ideas are a dime a dozen. That's the delusion most of these proposals have, that if only they got to share their great proposal with the world lots of people would come help pay for it and lots of developers would come do it for little or nothing. Your proposal sounds extremely similar to other crowdfunding / bounty / donation proposals that have been done, but most of them amount to "Now I've made a tip jar and put in the first $5, why is nothing happening?"

If you're real lucky you find a project where you put in a feature request and somebody says that's a great idea, I'll do it. If you're hiring at full commercial cost, there's tons of contractors willing to do it. Between there you might find people willing to work on it for everything from beer money to paying the bills, but then they mostly work on what they want, not what you want because they're contributing most of the value. The good thing is that they're usually in control of the scope and complexity of the tasks they agree to, so you usually get what you pay for. Still due to whiny brats it's best to put up a tip jar with no guarantees.

If you're looking for someone to create something that doesn't exist and thus probably is nobody's itch, you probably have to get close to commercial funding. Maybe some will do it for somewhat less since it's non-profit and for open source, but not beer money cheap. That means you have to get lots of people on board, which means mediating between all their pet ideas. And when push comes to shove you have to actually have to both get the funding and find someone willing to do it.

What you describe is the perfect waterfall spec, everything is described up front down to the smallest detail. Everyone who's worked with it in the real world knows it's a giant pain in the ass to create, which is why they go agile. Most likely it will have flaws and then the fun starts dealing with your co-sponsors and developer complaining about any inaccuracy in the spec, delay in delivery and what actually constitutes fulfillment. And you don't have any budget or power to approve change orders. Worst case you have a lawyer on your ass because the developer is fed up and wants to get paid.

...at which point 99.99% of the people with ideas will have said "shit I didn't want all this crap, I just had this great idea.... you fix it" and disappear in a puff of righteous indignation that the world didn't just take their great idea and ran with it. I mean that was the hard part right, like coming up with the script for a movie. Once you have that, actors, directors, producers and camera men will come running... or maybe not. I think you can build any platform you want for script writers and movie producers to meet each other, but it won't change the fundamentals. Same with idea people and open source developers.

Comment Re:Well, duh. Mass transportation is a slush fund. (Score 3, Informative) 369

It may work eventually, but it's a boondoggle for construction companies and mayors/governors.

So I must have been just dreaming when I thought I remembered zipping from London to Paris in just over two hours and sending emails from under the Atlantic seabed.

Your response is strange; the article and the GP are about cost overruns not whether the project is completed or not. The Chunnel did indeed overrun by about 80%.

Comment Re:Coast Starlight (Score 1) 369

Because Amtrak is a corporate welfare basket case that will never come close to justifying itself economically. We have aircraft now. Passenger rail is for short-distance commuting, and it's barely cost effective at that.

Aircraft can't bring you city center to city center. If you add up travel to and from the airport the break-even is usually 3-3.5 hours. The question is whether there's many enough passengers to justify it, laying down rail costs almost the same no matter how many travel. Airplanes are much closer tied to number of flights = cost of delivering service.

Comment Re:There will be no train (Score 3, Interesting) 369

"LAX is right on the coast, as far from the city center as one can get. It's a half-hour ride through traffic to downtown."

Yup. LAX is about 30 mins away from the center of downtown. Union station is about 10 min away from the center. Clearly we must spend billions and billions of dollars to turn a 60-90 min flight in to a 3 hour train ride that costs more and breaks the bank so a few people who can afford it can travel in comfort and shave 20 mins off their cab ride.

Makes perfect sense.

Comment So you'd deny the benefits to all but big cities? (Score 1) 513

I would restrict H-1Bs to only areas of the country where residential rents (per sq. foot) are in the lower 50 percentile.

So you'd give all the jobs-for-locals benefits to residents of a few big cities and leave the rest of the population in competition for high-value jobs with underpriced H1-Bs?

Looks to me like you completely missed the point of the Trump Win. He was elected by exactly those people you propose to leave out in the jobless cold, over a set of issues of which loss of jobs to foreigners by H1-B visas, illegal immigration, and outsourcing topped the list.

This election - not just the Presidential, but all down the ticket - was largely a revolt by the rural and the downtrodden against the urban elites. Trying to fix the problem only for those living in pricey cities and leave it in full force for these voters is a recipe for more extreme shakeups.

If the soapbox and the ballot box both don't work, and the jury box is unavailable, the only one they've go left is the ammo box.

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