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Comment Re:Borders. (Score 1) 128

The airport is located in Covington, KY (which gives the airport its code, CVG) and begrudgingly associates itself with Ohio and Cincinnati, which is about 10 miles away and across the river. Amazon already has a number of facilities in Covington and Erlanger down by the airport (completely in Kentucky) and there's a lot of capacity as Delta winds down operations, so this isn't too surprising.

Little bit of history about the airport: http://www.wcpo.com/news/our-community/from-the-vault/from-the-vault-why-cincinnatis-airport-is-in-kentucky-70-years-after-first-flights/

I moved here a few years ago. It's a very weird area.

Submission + - Creator of Pac-Man Dies at Age 91 (wsj.com)

An anonymous reader writes: WSJ, CNET, Fox News, NYT and others are reporting that Masaya Nakamura, the “Father of Pac-Man”, has died at the age of 91.

Nakamura founded Namco, part of Bandai Namco, in 1955. It started out as just two mechanical horse rides on a department store rooftop but went on to pioneer game arcades and amusement parks.

"The game was nonviolent but just challenging enough to hook players into steering the Pac-Man for hours through its mazes on the hunt for ghostly tidbits."

Submission + - Facebook Unveils Delegated Recovery Account Security System

Trailrunner7 writes: Facebook has developed a new account-recovery system that eschews the typical communications channels used for this process, and instead relies on a user’s connections with other services. The scheme allows users to regain access to accounts without providing any identifiable information to other services.

The Delegated Recovery system, which Facebook introduced at the Enigma conference here Monday, could be a major step forward in the way that sites handle the messy and sensitive process of account recovery. Right now, most sites use either email, SMS, or a combination of the two when a user needs to recover her account. A user typically clicks on a link, which will generate an email or text with a link that the user can follow to reset a password or go through other account-recovery steps.

The system that Facebook has implemented allows a user to link her Facebook account with an account on another site. Instead of using email or SMS, the two sites exchange cryptographically secured packages with data tokens. The two sites don’t change any identifiable information about the user during the process and the communications are done over HTTPS.

“The only thing that gets learned is that you have an account on the other site,” said Brad Hill, a Facebook engineer, who spoke at the Enigma conference. “No user-identifiable information is exchanged, so it’s not tied to a username, or email, or phone number.”

Submission + - Google quietly makes "optional" web DRM mandatory in Chrome 2

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: The World Wide Web Consortium's Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) is a DRM system for web video, being pushed by Netflix, movie studios, and a few broadcasters. It's been hugely controversial within the W3C and outside of it, but one argument that DRM defenders have made throughout the debate is that the DRM is optional, and if you don't like it, you don't have to use it. That's not true any more. Some time in the past few days, Google quietly updated Chrome (and derivative browsers like Chromium) so that Widevine (Google's version of EME) can no longer be disabled; it comes switched on and installed in every Chrome instance. Because of laws like section 1201 of the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act (and Canada's Bill C11, and EU implementations of Article 6 of the EUCD), browsers that have DRM in them are risky for security researchers to audit. These laws provide both criminal and civil penalties for those who tamper with DRM, even for legal, legitimate purposes, and courts and companies have interpreted this to mean that companies can punish security researchers who reveal defects in their products.

Submission + - Virtual reality to diagnose and treat vertigo in pioneering study (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: irtual reality could be used to diagnose and treat people with vertigo, doctors believe. A team of psychologists from Cardiff University in the UK are building virtual reality simulations that will be used to identify visual triggers in patients, in the hope that it will shed light on the causes of the condition and new rehabilitation techniques.

The study aims to further psychologists' understanding of visual vertigo, an often debilitating condition causes episodes of severe dizziness and nausea in sufferers. The condition can be caused by damage to vestibular system, the part of the inner ear responsible for balance and spatial orientation in mammals.

Submission + - SPAM: 'Father of Pac-Man,' Masaya Nakamura, dies at age 91

AmiMoJo writes: Masaya Nakamura, the founder of game developer Namco and known as “the father of Pac-Man,” has died at age 91. He founded Nakamura Seisakusho in 1955, which was renamed Namco in 1977. The company developed numerous hit video games, including “Galaxian,” “Pac-Man” and “Ridge Racer.” Pac-Man,” designed by Namco’s inhouse video game maker Toru Iwatani, is one of the most recognizable and popular video games in history. In 2005 it was listed by Guinness World Records as the “most successful coin-operated arcade machine.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Soyuz launches successfully from French Guiana (nasaspaceflight.com)

schwit1 writes: A Russian Soyuz rocket, built for Arianespace and launched from French Guiana, successfully placed a commercial satellite in geosynchronous orbit on Friday.

The launch has some significance. First, it was the first time a Soyuz rocket placed a payload into geosynchronous orbit. Second, the payload was the first satellite built by a German company in more than 25 years

Finally, and most important, it demonstrated that at least one configuration of the Soyuz rocket is still operational as Russia investigates the corrupt practices at the company that has been building upper stage engines for both its Soyuz and Proton rockets.

Submission + - Universities of Delft, Munich beat MIT in Hyperloop pod competition (yahoo.com)

mrvan writes: Two international university teams clinched top honors for the first test phase of Elon Musk's Hyperloop competition that ran this weekend. The Delft Hyperloop team, of Delft University in the Netherlands, got the highest overall score. Technical University of Munich, Germany secured the award for the fastest pod. And MIT placed third overall in the competition, which was judged by SpaceX engineers. Although teams have been participating in the SpaceX Hyperloop competition since 2015, this weekend marked the first time qualifiers got the opportunity to test their Hyperloop pod on the mile-long SpaceX track. In 2016, SpaceX selected 30 teams to participate this weekend after passing through the design phase of the competition.

Submission + - Deep Learning Algorithm Diagnoses Skin Cancer As Well As Seasoned Dermatologists (extremetech.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Remember how that Google neural net learned to tell the difference between dogs and cats? It’s helping catch skin cancer now, thanks to some scientists at Stanford who trained it up and then loosed it on a huge set of high-quality diagnostic images. During recent tests, the algorithm performed just as well as almost two dozen veteran dermatologists in deciding whether a lesion needed further medical attention. The algorithm is called a deep convolutional neural net. It started out in development as Google Brain, using their prodigious computing capacity to power the algorithm’s decision-making capabilities. When the Stanford collaboration began, the neural net was already able to identify 1.28 million images of things from about a thousand different categories. But the researchers needed it to know a malignant carcinoma from a benign seborrheic keratosis. Dermatologists often use an instrument called a dermoscope to closely examine a patient’s skin. This provides a roughly consistent level of magnification and a pretty uniform perspective in images taken by medical professionals. Many of the images the researchers gathered from the Internet weren’t taken in such a controlled setting, so they varied in terms of angle, zoom, and lighting. But in the end, the researchers amassed about 130,000 images of skin lesions representing over 2,000 different diseases. They used that dataset to create a library of images, which they fed to the algorithm as raw pixels, each pixel labeled with additional data about the disease depicted. Then they asked the algorithm to suss out the patterns: to find the rules that define the appearance of the disease as it spreads through tissue. The researchers tested the algorithm’s performance against the diagnoses of 21 dermatologists from the Stanford medical school, on three critical diagnostic tasks: keratinocyte carcinoma classification, melanoma classification, and melanoma classification when viewed using dermoscopy. In their final tests, the team used only high-quality, biopsy-confirmed images of malignant melanomas and malignant carcinomas. When presented with the same image of a lesion and asked whether they would “proceed with biopsy or treatment, or reassure the patient,” the algorithm scored 91% as well as the doctors, in terms of sensitivity (catching all the cancerous lesions) and sensitivity (not getting false positives).

Submission + - House science chairman: 'Get your news directly from the president' (cnn.com) 1

ClickOnThis writes: CNN has reported that Rep. Lamar Smith (R), chairman of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee is asking Americans to trust the information they get from the President over the news produced by the media. From the article:

Republican Rep. Lamar Smith saluted President Donald Trump from the floor of the House on Tuesday evening, rattling off his first-week accomplishments but saying Trump is not getting the press coverage he deserves.

"The national liberal media won't print that, or air it or post it," Smith said. "Better to get your news directly from the President. In fact, it might be the only way to get the unvarnished truth."


Submission + - The Government Wants to Regulate Vehicle Software Security

Trailrunner7 writes: A new bill introduced in the House of Representatives Tuesday would force the federal government to perform a long-term study of the security and privacy controls of the software running in vehicles, including their navigation, entertainment and other systems.

The bill is sponsored by Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) and Rep. Joe Wilson (R-S.C.), and it’s another indication that federal regulators are taking a hard look at the security of a wide range of devices, including vehicles, medical devices, and IoT gear. The main thrust of the bill is to require the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, along with NIST, the FTC and the Secretary of Defense, to produce a study on the necessary standards for regulating the cybersecurity of vehicles.

Submission + - Mars Exploration Rover - Opportunity - 13th Anniversary

cusco writes: January 25, 2004 the second Mars Exploration Rover landed on the Red Planet. Opportunity completed its 90-day mission without any major issues, and NASA requested funding for a mission extension. The mission has since been extended over a dozen times, and today marks the beginning of the 13th year of it's '90-day' mission. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missio...

The solar panels provide a maximum of 140 watts of power. The computer has 128 mb of RAM. Each of the six wheels has its own motor, and four of them are steerable. It landed wrapped in air bags and bounced 26 times before coming to a rest in Eagle Crater, within 25 kilometers of its initial target area. Designed to travel less than 100 meters a day, Opportunity has driven over 43 kilometers and returned over 200,000 photographs. It's currently on the rim of Endeavor Crater, traveling towards a water-cut gully a kilometer away. http://mars.nasa.gov/mer/missi...

Opportunity is now officially a teenager! Happy Birthday! http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/...

Submission + - T-Mobile Eliminates Cheaper Postpaid Plans, Sells 'Unlimited Data' Only (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: T-Mobile USA will stop selling its older and cheaper limited-data plans to postpaid customers, shifting entirely to its new "unlimited" data plans that impose bandwidth limits on video and tethering unless customers pay extra. To ease the transition, T-Mobile will offer bill credits of $10 a month to customers when they use less than 2GB per month. T-Mobile began its shift to unlimited data plans in August with the introduction of T-Mobile One, which starts at $70 a month. While there are no data caps, customers have to pay a total of $95 a month to get high-definition video and mobile hotspot speeds of greater than 512kbps. The carrier said in August that the unlimited plan would be "replacing all our rate plans," including its cheaper plans that cost $50 or $65 a month. Nonetheless, T-Mobile kept selling limited postpaid data plans to new customers for a few months, but yesterday CEO John Legere said that as of January 22, T-Mobile One will be the "only postpaid consumer plan we sell." Existing postpaid customers can keep their current plans. For new customers, T-Mobile will presumably keep selling its prepaid plans that cost $40 to $60 a month and come with 3GB to 10GB of data. T-Mobile also said yesterday that it will start including taxes and fees in its advertised rate when customers sign up for new T-Mobile One plans and enroll in automatic payments, essentially giving subscribers a discount. "The average monthly bill for a family of four will drop from $180.48 to $160, according to a company spokesman," The Wall Street Journal reported.

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