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Submission + - Microsoft Teams Launches Out Of Preview

Krystalo writes: Microsoft today announced Microsoft Teams — with Android, iOS, Mac, Windows, and web apps — has hit general availability in 181 countries and 19 languages. The company’s answer to Slack is part of Office 365, meaning Microsoft Teams is for businesses only — there are no plans for a free or consumer version. Microsoft Teams is a web-based chat service aimed at businesses — and schools, though they’re not getting access today — that have multiple teams working on various projects at once. It features channels/groups, private messages, Skype video and audio calls, Office 365 integration (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files), OneDrive support, Power BI and Planner integrations, as well as emoji, Giphy images, memes, and so on.

Submission + - Google Open-Sources Chrome For iOS

Krystalo writes: Google has uploaded its Chrome for iOS code into the open-source Chromium repository. In other words, Chrome for iOS has now been open-sourced like Chrome for other platforms, letting anyone examine, modify, and compile the project. Chromium is the open-source Web browser project that shares much of the same code as Google Chrome, and new features are often added there first. Google intended for Chromium to be the name of the open-source project, while the final product name would be Chrome, but developers have taken the code and released versions under the Chromium name. Eventually, many browser makers started using it as a starting point; Opera, for example, switched its browser base to Chromium in 2013.

Submission + - Adobe Is Killing Contribute, Director, And Shockwave

Krystalo writes: Adobe today announced Adobe Contribute and Adobe Director will no longer be for sale nor supported as of February 1, 2017. At the same time, Adobe is also stopping Shockwave for Mac updates and support on March 14, 2017 after the last release of the product. The reason Adobe gives for the death of Contribute and Director is simple: The company’s customers are embracing “the new features and efficiencies offered by Creative Cloud.” As for Shockwave, its content is made with Director, so the company is merely tying up loose ends. It’s about time.

Submission + - Chrome 56 Arrives With Warning For HTTP Webpages, 28% Faster Page Reloading

Krystalo writes: Google has launched Chrome 56 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. Among the additions is a new warning for websites that collect passwords or credit card numbers but don’t use HTTPS; improvements to performance and efficiency of page reloading; and a ton of features for developers. You can update to the latest version now using the browser’s built-in silent updater, or download it directly from google.com/chrome.

Submission + - Mozilla Releases The Internet Health Report, An Open-Source Document

Krystalo writes: Fresh off its brand redesign, Mozilla has released The Internet Health Report, an open-source initiative to document the state of the internet, combining research and reporting from multiple sources. The report, which will be improved and expanded throughout the year, covers five key topics: decentralization, digital inclusion, open innovation, privacy and security, and web literacy.

Submission + - Asus Unveils ZenFone AR With Google's Daydream And Tango Support, Coming In Q2

Krystalo writes: Probably the most-leaked device at CES 2017 so far has been the Asus ZenFone AR, through no fault of the Taiwanese company. Partner Qualcomm revealed much of the details in a blog post touting the use of its Snapdragon 821 chipset, and infamous leaker Evan Blass (evleaks) added front and back press renders of the phone. The key part that was missing was a release timeframe, which we now have: Q2 2017. The ZenFone AR stands out as the first smartphone that will support both of Google’s Daydream and Tango platforms, and is only the second to support the latter (Lenovo’s Phab 2 Pro was the first). Daydream is a virtual reality (VR) platform built into Android 7.0 Nougat and above. Tango is an augmented reality (AR) platform that detects users’ positions relative to places and objects around them without using GPS or other external signals.

Submission + - Mozilla Will Support Firefox For XP And Vista Until At Least September 2017

Krystalo writes: Mozilla today announced that it will continue to support Firefox for Windows XP and Windows Vista until September 2017. In March 2017, XP and Vista users will automatically be moved to the Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) and in mid-2017 the company will reassess user numbers to announce a final support end date for the two operating systems.

Submission + - Mozilla Updates Firefox Focus For iOS With A Stripped-Down Private Browser

Krystalo writes: Mozilla today launched a new browser for iOS. In addition to Firefox, the company now also offers Firefox Focus, a browser dedicated to user privacy that by default blocks many web trackers, including analytics, social, and advertising. You can download the new app now from Apple’s App Store. If you’re getting a huge feeling of déjà vu, that’s because in December 2015, Mozilla launched Focus by Firefox, a content blocker for iOS. The company has now rebranded the app as Firefox Focus, and it serves two purposes. The content blocker, which can still be used with Safari, remains unchanged. The basic browser, which can be used in conjunction with Firefox for iOS, is new.

Submission + - Google Joins Microsoft's .NET Foundation

Krystalo writes: As part of its slew of announcements at its Connect(); 2016 developer event in New York City today, Microsoft unveiled that Google is joining the .NET Foundation. Specifically, Google is becoming a member of the Technical Steering Group, which Microsoft says “reinforces the vibrancy of the .NET developer community” and also underlines “Google’s commitment to fostering an open platform that supports businesses and developers who have standardized on .NET.”

Submission + - Microsoft Joins The Linux Foundation As A Platinum Member

Krystalo writes: At its Connect(); 2016 developer event in New York City today, Microsoft announced it is joining The Linux Foundation. And the company isn’t joining just to say it did: Microsoft is becoming a Platinum member, the highest level of membership, which costs $500,000 annually. John Gossman, architect on the Microsoft Azure team, will sit on the foundation’s Board of Directors and help underwrite projects.

Submission + - Benchmark Battle October 2016: Chrome Vs. Firefox Vs. Edge

Krystalo writes: It’s been more than a year since our last browser benchmark battle, and the competition remains fierce. Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge have all gained a variety of new features and improvements over the past year. It’s time to see if any of them have managed to pull ahead of the pack. It appears that Edge has made the biggest gains since last year. That said, browser performance is improving at a very rapid pace, and it shouldn’t be your only consideration when picking your preferred app for consuming Internet content.

Submission + - Chrome 54 Arrives With YouTube Flash Embed Rewriting To HTML5

Krystalo writes: Google today launched Chrome 54 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This release is mainly focused on developers, but the improvements to how the browser handles YouTube embeds is also noteworthy. You can update to the latest version now using the browser’s built-in silent updater, or download it directly from google.com/chrome. Chrome 54 rewrites YouTube Flash players to use the YouTube HTML5 embed style. YouTube ditched Flash for HTML5 by default in January 2015, but the old embeds still exist all over the web. Google says the change improves both performance and security for its desktop browser.

Submission + - Google Open Sources Chrome For Android

An anonymous reader writes: Google has uploaded the majority of the remaining Chrome for Android code into the open-source Chromium repository. In other words, Chrome for Android now matches Chrome for desktop in terms of available open-source code, letting anyone examine, modify, and compile the project. Chromium is the open-source Web browser project that shares much of the same code as Google Chrome, and new features are often added there first.

Submission + - Google Releases Android Studio 1.0, The First Stable Version Of Its IDE 1

An anonymous reader writes: After two years of development, Google today released Android Studio 1.0, the first stable version of its Integrated Development Environment (IDE) aimed solely at Android developers. You can download the tool right now for Windows, Mac, and Linux from the Android Developer site. Google first announced Android Studio, built on the popular IntelliJ IDEA Java IDE, at its I/O Developer conference in May 2013. The company's pitch was very simple: this is the official Android IDE.

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