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Comment Re:So give us your tax money (Score 1) 125

You want to waste money on all that?

What, do they write treaties on gold-pressed latinum now?

Compare costs of a typical treaty negotiation meeting to a just a single strike of ~50 Tomahawk cruise missiles at ~$325M each.

Diplomacy is ^always^ the cheaper option.

Now compare that same ballpark figure of the costs of negotiating a new treaty to the cost of effectively being cut out of the economic, technical, and scientific benefits of space exploration/exploitation.

Diplomacy is far and away the better option.

Strat

Comment Re:So give us your tax money (Score 1) 125

The treaty is required especially on the basis of preventing nuclear weapons use in space.

No.

*A* treaty is required, *this* one can be replaced/renegotiated. Isn't that what civilized nations do when circumstances change, renegotiate or replace a dated treaty with a new, more comprehensive one that accounts for current realities?

Strat

Comment Re: This needs to stay (Score 1) 269

you're dumb enough to esteem the judgment of a guy who hired someone dumb enough to take money from foreign sources and not report it

Oh, you're referring to the guy THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION gave a security clearance to in 2016, following a review of his business dealings in Russia? That guy? One of the reasons he didn't get even more scrutiny while being considered for that job was the fact that the previous administration had just vetted him post Russian involvement and considered him worthy of an unsponsored security clearance. Which you know, but you're pretending you don't so you can spew your usual phony ad hominem. Thanks for tending so carefully to your ongoing hypocrisy display. Continue!

Comment Re:EE Degree (Score 1) 184

Ever studied dynamic systems? The journey from Newton's first principles to the Hamiltonians and Lagrangians too a couple hundred years for a reason: the math of modeling the evolution of a stateful classical system is very distant from the math that describes that system in some elegant way. The connection between the two is non-obvious, to say the least.

State in programming is very straightforward, though I guess it's equally distant from the elegant mathematical systems of the lambda calculus and combinator logic.

Not to mention the fact that the best programming is only frugally stateful anyway.

That's certainly the current fad. The best programming is "whatever approach keeps things simple", which is never going to be the same tool for all jobs.
 

Comment Re:So what's the issue? (Score 1) 203

So you're telling me that they should have owned the issue that they caused, and worked around it instead of putting the burden and blame on the customer? Why, that's like an airline unexpectedly needing 4 seats to get its employees to another airport on time, and thus putting them on a turboprop or in a company car instead of calling the cops to beat up the passenger who won't give up his seat!

Comment Re:The correct course of action (Score 1) 195

but there's clearly a necessity that those services be provided in some form or function, and the 538 members of Congress are clearly not up to the task of managing all of that on their own, especially once you consider that most of those agencies are far larger than Congress itself.

That's precisely the point; those who wrote the Constitution and those today who believe similarly do not believe many of those things are the job of the federal government, and for those things which are, Congress should be the only body in government with the power to pass laws, as they are elected which gives the people some direct way to keep them accountable and not appointed/hired. This delegation of powers is a large part of how the government has gone about expanding it's powers and scope.

The other problem is reinterpretation and redefining words and meanings of the Constitution to achieve political/ideological goals rather than using the means provided in the document to alter it. Maybe there's some civil right like the 2nd Amendment you disagree with (not accusing, I don't know nor care, this is just for discussion) and maybe this achieves your short-term goal(s), but it weakens all the other civil rights most people, including yourself, value, and renders them vulnerable to the same methods and strategies to effectively nullify/rewrite/abolish them. A case of "be careful what you wish for, you just might get it!" for those

Strat

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