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Comment Re:More science (Score 1) 241

It's basic physics man. This has been understood for over 100 years. Welcome to the 19th century.

As another reply above points out, this is about making predictions about specific behaviors and trends in a super-massively-chaotic system. The number of variables able to substantially change outcomes is staggering in a system as massively-chaotic as the Earth.

When we have the computing power to model and predict the precise orbits of every bit of rock in the asteroid belt bigger than a basketball, you *might* have sufficient computational muscle to be able to create a model accurate enough to make life-and-death decisions for billions of people. Until then all you have is hand-waving, and that's with a 'gimme' assumption that the proper data is able to be acquired to construct such a model and that the algorithms work properly.

Sorry, but humanity does not yet possess sufficient understanding of global climate nor the computing power necessary to create models with sufficiently-small margins of error to justify many of the extreme actions/measures that are being called for by alarmists.

Strat

Comment Re:Let's hope they do arrest him (Score 1) 356

but we got American spies killed in the process

No, those US intelligence agencies and the people who run them who broke US laws, violated US citizen's civil rights, and actively suppressed whistleblowers to avoid legal repercussions for their criminal actions are getting American spies killed by making these kinds of "dumps" of secret/classified info the only practical option to reining in their abuses.

Strat

Comment Re:Choices. (Score 1) 106

Not all my neighbors have noisy kids, because statistics.

Not all your neighbors rent through ABnB because statistics. Why is the garage band next door OK but not someone putting a spare room on ABnB for some extra cash? ABnB guests who are noisy or otherwise objectionable are the exception because statistics.

Yup. As long as it doesn't prevent other people from enjoying their properties.

Ah see, and there's the rub! Who defines and sets the standards for what "preventing other people from enjoying their properties" constitutes exactly, and what all does that or can that cover?

Too much legal gray area has been left and so is being legislated through the court system and defined by corporate lawyers instead of being addressed and definitions/limits set by the appropriate legislature. The result is abuse of the system by those with money and legal teams and the loss of individual freedom and property rights.

Strat

Comment Re:Choices. (Score 1) 106

AirBNB is pretty good for the customers, no real argument there.. It just forces the neighbors who signed up to live in a residential area to live like they were next to a hotel.

You mean as opposed to living next door to the houses in practically every suburban neighborhood where the kids have a garage band 'rehearsing' after school?

How about we just limit the number of properties/rooms someone can put up on ABnB and/or require the property be the primary residence of the property owner who must occupy it a minimum number of months per year to prevent commercial exploitation?

It seems to me that a private homeowner should be given the maximum amount of freedom to do with his property as he pleases, and it should be the laws and regulations which should adapt accordingly to the extent reasonably and pragmatically possible to maintain equal protections for all while doing so, rather than limiting a homeowner's freedom and property rights as the primary option.

Strat

Comment Re: That's not the reason for expense (Score 1) 123

yep sounds like he's mistaking a grant and a loan.

Doesn't invalidate the gist of OP's post, however.

Forcing by law that all student loans to be of the government-guaranteed type means universities and colleges are free to raise their prices because the taxpayer's pockets are deep and the government doesn't effectively cap loan guarantees in such a way as to discourage educational price-gouging by the schools. This naturally translates to increases in associated costs, like textbooks in this case.

Heck they *want* a lot of heavily-indebted students because; "Want to get your government-guaranteed student debt discharged? Just come to work as $GOV/MIL/LEOJOB for $YEARS. Serve your community and your nation while becoming debt-free! Fast tracks to becoming student-debt-free available to those with security/crowd-control/corrections skills and experience."

The government gets people even less-free to object/quit than Silicon Valley H1B workers as the government might deport an H1B worker, but defaulting on a loan-repayment agreement with the IRS for your student loan debt could easily land you in jail, maybe even killed if they send a SWAT team to serve the warrant (already happened, the SWAT team for student loan default, not the 'killed' part, although it easily could have ended tragically).

Strat

Comment Re:How Long Until M$ deliberately breaks this... (Score 1) 218

How obtuse do you have to be to think it's a good idea to copy your username into the body of your post.

You use this word, but I do not think it means what you think it means. Besides, I'm so old you're lucky I didn't sign it using hieroglyphs and sent it using RFC 2549.

My lawn, off it you'll get!

Strat

Comment Re:How Long Until M$ deliberately breaks this... (Score 1) 218

Serious tin foil hat time pal. You may want to install foil around your house too.

I guess you missed the whole Snowden/NSA thing, and all the other revelations about US domestic spying/mass-data collection and analysis, "parallel construction", "Stingray" IMSI-catchers, etc etc, huh?

Sorry AC, but now all but the most "fringe" people who used to be labeled tinfoil-hat-wearing conspiracy-theorists regarding the lengths the US government has gone and is willing to go to monitor the domestic populace are now labeled "prescient" and are running around shouting "See!? I *told* you so!!"

Strat

Comment Re:How Long Until M$ deliberately breaks this... (Score 3, Interesting) 218

I'm half convinced that money is only part of what they're after. Windows 10 gives them more or less complete control over the computer; they can use your computer for whatever they want, and you have no say about it unless you yank the plug out of the wall or wipe the drive and install something else.

It also means they can put anything they want on your computer or remove anything, and they can sell this ability to the US government (and/or the highest bidder) in exchange for continuing to turn a blind eye to MS's shenanigans.

With Win10, using parallel construction to discredit/destroy/imprison government whistle-blowers, political/ideological enemies, or other "inconvenient people" is as easy as point-and-click. Ah, progress!

Strat

Comment Re:No (Score 1) 478

The only solution is to not make movies about the Armenian genocide .

Or Scientology.
Or feminism.

Those are OK, relatively-speaking, compared to making a video recording of abortion providers discussing selling baby parts for profit! That will actually get your house raided, any videos there confiscated, and yourself arrested and charged. Darned pesky 1st Amendment, but at least that particular use of free press and free speech rights to expose criminal actions was crushed! Another victory for Progressives.

Strat

Comment Re:He is an idiot... (Score 1) 303

....and why the Federal government was meant to be extremely weak domestically, and States and local governments were intended to do nearly all domestic governing.

No. Anyone who still believes this stupid crap needs to go back to 9th grade and take US History again. The Constitution was written because the confederacy of states was exactly what you describe... weak federal, strong state.

And the US Constitution made the Federal government *somewhat* more powerful in a few select areas, but the Federal government still remained relatively weak. Now we have a government that re-interprets the plain meaning of words to expand it's power & scope, like Commerce Clause/Wickard v Filburn and requiring every citizen to purchase something from a private third-party simply to remain within the law and avoid penalties including prison under threat of lethal force, and then there's civil forfeiture where you don't even have to be charged with any crime to have cash and other valuables seized 'because reasons'.

They had to pass a Constitutional Amendment to both prohibit alcohol and another to un-prohibit it, but magically, now after some dudes in funny black robes declared that silly old Constitution didn't really mean what it said, drugs can be declared 'controlled' and/or 'prohibited/illegal' and placed in, and moved around between, various levels of legal control and prohibition by unelected government bureaucrats, the Federal government ties our border agent's hands to prevent them from doing their job of stopping illegal aliens coming in, but practically no resource or manpower is spared to check carefully for trucks crossing the border with contraband toilets that flush over the legal US federal limit. Then there's domestic spying, "parallel construction", the IRS and other agencies/departments used as political weapons to suppress dissent.

The US Federal government has "gone rogue" as it no longer recognizes any limits to it's power when those limits stand in the way of one of it's primary agendas.

Strat

Comment Re: He is an idiot... (Score 1) 303

What we see in the US today is largely the result of too much domestic power in the hands of the central government.

Funny, because NOT using that power is exactly what people are criticizing him for doing, as the actual action taken was to repudiate a rule that had the central government forbidding the very behavior we find objectionable.

Methinks that BlueStrat is letting his ideology lead his thinking, not the actual facts and circumstances.

Emotional reactions are common on the right-wing though, so it is no surprise.

Methinks you're either being intellectually dishonest/obtuse or missing the forest for the trees, bigly. Since you post in 'coward'-mode, I find the former most likely.

The point is that if the government was not so corrupt because having tons of concentrated power attracts bad people, asshats like this Congressman would not be in office and/or saying such stupid crap because he's been co-opted by those with wealth and power.

Strat

Comment Re:He is an idiot... (Score 3, Interesting) 303

Why the hell was this guy the Chairman of the House Committee on Science and Technology anyway?

The US version of "Game of Thrones", that's why and how.

Whenever there are "thrones" of power and wealth, there will be "Game of Thrones" Machiavellian politics and machinations robbing the people of their wealth and freedom. It's a part of human nature, and one that collectivist political ideologies always fail by ignoring when they place power in the hands of a few.

This is why the US Constitution was written so as to distribute power and discourage it's concentration in one area/branch/office-holder of government and why the Federal government was meant to be extremely weak domestically, and States and local governments were intended to do nearly all domestic governing.

What we see in the US today is largely the result of too much domestic power in the hands of the central government. Until the central government's powers and scope are reined-in, anything else is simply treating the symptoms at best.

Strat

Comment Re:Dumb (Score 2) 230

No, they are just holding them wrong.

Don't try to blame this on Apple. Those vape pen are running Samsung firmware, those sailors must have accidentally activated 'incendiary grenade mode'.

Nah, they were made by Zorg Industries right alongside their (in)famous ZF-1 infantry weapon systems, complete with the little red button.

No, of course the OP is right, every similar vaping incident I've heard about was ultimately the result of ignorant and stupid people doing Tim Allen/'Tool Time' impersonations trying to "give it more *power*! ugh-ugh!" with their vaping gear.

Instead of throwing FDA regulations at the vaping industry to try to cripple it because it threatens 'big tobacco' and the taxes tobacco generates, the government should instead assist in bringing industry leaders together to set technical standards for the manufacture of vaping hardware, like fittings sizes, battery and compartment sizes, etc etc, to make it a lot of work to fit a too-powerful battery into a unit that fits a too-weak coil for that capacity battery and so on, the same general idea applied to the range of vaping hardware. Standard sizes and threadings of component parts in the various ratings/classes created in this way can be adopted industry-wide so that dangerously-incompatible components are a lot more trouble for some idiot to put together.

As usual, government's actions belie their actual priorities, and equally no surprise that the safety of regular people is way down the list.

Strat

Comment Re:Driverless (Score 1) 271

So you're saying they're going to take an entire array of sensors from a fighter jet and put it in a regular car and it's still going to be affordable for people... ooooo k

Stop being intentionally obtuse. Much of the technology in a modern vehicle came as spin-offs from military and the space program. Where/why do you think forward-looking radar (used in a Tesla's forward-looking sensor) came from/was developed?

You're tilting at the wrong windmills again.Don Quixote.

Strat

Comment Re:Driverless (Score 1) 271

I'm just saying this because it seems like people talk about a lot of sensors. Cameras are definitely not useful in winter. If they are covered they are covered. Doesn't autopilot use cameras? I keep hearing that Radar and Lidar each have weaknesses. Lidar is apparently fooled by fog so I'm not envisioning how that could work through ice.

Well, they've had sensors on all-weather fighter jets for how many decades, now? And that's not mentioning sensor tech in the newer aircraft designs, especially the near-future AI/drone types of aircraft, fighter/military and other.

The sensors really are not the weak link here. It's the software and algorithms that make sense of the data from the sensors and other inputs, and output control signals to the vehicle. If you want to pick something to doubt on, that's the area to do it, not sensor tech which is quite arguably far more advanced and far exceeds the capabilities of the hardware and software meant to control these things has to effectively use the data.

Strat

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