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Comment Javascript (Score 1) 88

The VAST majority of fingerprinting and most of the useful stuff relies on whoever is doing the fingerprinting running their javascript in your browser (client). Using something like NoScript to block javascript by default and limiting what you allow is quite effective at fighting fingerprinting.

Definitely not a magic bullet but it's super helpful for this and lots of other web annoyances.
Plus, you get to learn just how much useless javascript most sites want you to run (3rd party that has no impact on functionality)

Comment Re:Mac sales lead to other sales (Score 2) 230

This right here.

Look at my username. LOOK AT IT.

I was a Mac-only guy back in the late 90's. I had a subscription to MacAddict magazine for several years. My first computer was a beige G3/300 running MacOS 8.1. I eventually upgraded that box to 224MB of RAM and added a Voodoo3 3000 card (with the firmware flashed for the Mac).

I hated Windows and everything it stood for. But I started using white-box hardware running Windows when I wanted to make Unreal Tournament maps in 2002.

When I got over that phase (in 2005 or so), I started running Linux. But it was annoying and limiting and didn't play any good games. So I went back to Windows.

Not too long after that, I switched from being a primarily PHP/Java developer to a .Net/C# developer. This was around the 2007 to 2008 time-frame, so a good, solid, paying job was nothing to scoff at just for requiring the use of Microsoft software. As I began to learn more about .Net, I found that it's the "it just works" of software development ecosystems. When Windows 7 came along, I jumped on it. Windows 8.1 was good on a tablet. Windows 10 has been just fine. And through it all, .Net has been great. I've made a comfortable living for most of the last decade doing .Net development.

Sure, I kept buying Macs up until about 2007 or so. I had an iPhone (original model) for a while. But Apple's shit just gets on my nerves. Over and over they promised things that never happened. They produced shiny hardware that never performed. They kept nerfing the software. And when OSX 10.5 came out and replaced the normal IP firewall with an application firewall, I knew it was over. I haven't bothered with a new Mac since. I have actively pushed people away from Apple products. When people ask for help with esoteric Apple issues, I tell them "I don't know anything about Apple products", which, funny enough, is what I used to say about Windows.

So I've been there, and I've done that. Your journey away from Apple is just beginning. Mine has finished, and I have no regrets about it. And Apple should take it to heart if they want to survive.

Comment Re:Was Obvious from the Start (Score 1) 330

I happen to find that having to pull my phone out of my pocket is dramatically harder than simply looking at a watch on my wrist. Sounds crazy but I had ditched watches long ago in favor of checking my phone for the time until I randomly received a watch as a gift. I started wearing it and realized how much more convenient it was! Seems like most people are so used to checking their phones that they forgot how nice having a watch can be (-8

Comment Re:Doesn't matter. (Score 2, Informative) 80

Windows is far superior to Mac OS X. So is Linux.

Having been a user of all three, and a developer on all three, systems for many years, I actually know what I'm talking about.

I would readily recommend Windows workstations and, for some tasks, servers. I would readily recommend Linux for servers. I have written software for both. I would not recommend Macs for anything, as the hardware is unimpressive and not different from anything any other PC manufacturer makes, and the software is stifling and foam-padded so as not to be "unfriendly". Personally, I find that exact quality to be rather unfriendly in and of itself.

So if you need a Fisher-Price computer, and you feel you need to pay double the market rate for it, by all means, buy an Apple. And don't be too sad when your "new" computer is poorly supported, gets cut off from necessary updates, and bogs down under the "burden" of minor software updates over the course of the next two years. Everyone who has ever bought a Mac certainly understands your pain.

I used to be a fanboi like you, and if you don't believe me, check my username.

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