Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! ×

Comment Re:You may not like this (Score 1) 339

No, this is not promoting race hatred, it's an explanation of the political differences between two parties and what they mean to the little people.

It's not only the Blacks who are having their chains forged right now. Loss of privacy, loss of social safety-nets, loss of ecological protection (so that people who breathe bad air or drink polluted water get sick all of the time), each one of those is a link in a chain.

Comment Re:As someone who grew up disadvantaged (Score 1) 339

Uhm... okay, so care to explain to me how you know all the kids at the library are rich?

It's the designer sneakers, iPhones, and the glow of good nutrition and medical care.

Go out on the street and see what you can tell about the people who walk by from what they wear and the appearance of nutrition and medical care. It's pretty easy.

Comment Re:Background and the real issue (Score 1) 339

Allowing states to block issuance of lifeline broadband to the poor influences how they vote, whether they get jobs, and many other aspects of their lives.

Some providers just got ordered to disconnect their poor customers and let those customers wait for the states to provide them another way to connect - or more likely for the states to not provide them a way to connect.

Comment Re:Background and the real issue (Score 1) 339

Yes. If you had some variant of Condorcet as the voting process, you would have cast a valid first choice for Stein and a second choice for Clinton, and perhaps Clinton would have gotten the same number of votes overall but not more, and Stein would have had a fair chance

The proposition here that I have a problem with, however, is that Trump would have gotten more votes if some people were convinced that those votes did not matter. He would at best have gotten the same amount of votes, and other conservative candidates would have had at least a fair chance against him if they didn't win.

Comment Re:Nickle and dime pricing, I'm sure. (Score 1) 51

You're conflating two types of customers: individuals (who just want to grab a tool and get on with their job) and corporations (who want every procurement to have a business case and approval from IT Security, Legal, Supply Chain, a Business Analyst, and 3-4 managers). The open source product wins because the developer/engineer/analysts/creative can just use it and ...er... ask for permission later (like maybe never, later). The big Oracle-like products win because they can afford account reps who will wine-and-dine the C-class folks (who can cut thru the crap required to swipe the company credit card). The micro-ISV loses because--while they may have folks in the company who passionately want their product--there's just too much bureaucracy in the way to make it happen.

I recently advocated for my company to buy a cloud-based product from an existing ISV whom we already had a relationship with. It took MONTHS, despite this product being mission-critical (the older on-premise version had no DR, wasn't getting backed up, etc.). Legal went around in circles trying to revise the ISV's standard contract before capitulating. (Duh... they have a monopoly on this industry segment and they're the only source of the data.) Much hand-wringing was made about using a vendor-hosted solution (okay, somewhat valid, but the data was at more risk sitting on an unpatched server in our DMZ). At least 3 managers and 1 business analyst had to stomp for it, and we only had ~1 month left in the fiscal year when we inked the deal. If that arbitrary date had passed, there would have been a huge headache about how to fund it. If the hard drive in that server had failed, we would have been hemorrhaging money for weeks.

Comment Re:Background and the real issue (Score 1) 339

Supression of the Black vote is well documented, and doesn't particularly concern the race of the Black people, but the fact that they tend to vote Democratic and are an easy target for suppression because they are already disenfranchised and poverty-stricken.

If the Republicans suppress someone's vote, they can not shield themselves by saying that anyone who fights it is accusing them of racism. They have to face the well-documented evidence that those votes have been suppressed, and continue to be suppressed.

Comment Re:Self inflicted (Score 1) 225

Well, financially speaking bankruptcy doesn't happen because you don't make profit. It happens because you run out of cash flow to meet your current obligations.

Had Westinghouse back in the 90s gone all-in on a fuel cycle it had no practical experience with, it would be pretty much where it is today: building the first power plants of a new design, after a multi-decade hiatus in commissioning nuclear power plants. Either way it's a recipe for construction delays, which equal cost overruns without corresponding new revenue, which equals bankruptcy.

The only way to get a large-scale nuclear power plant business off the ground is to have vast quantities of cash on hand, which businesses don't like to do because keeping cash relatively idle costs money too.

Comment Re:What do you get with a TV-celeb as prez? (Score 1) 284

5 is a lot younger than 9. In fact developmentally it's a lot younger than the 45% chronologically younger it is.

Once a medical entomologist I was working with came to me with a flow chart he'd done in Visio. "I need a program that can do this," he said. "I've looked at different modeling applications but it won't be easy in any of them. I'm pretty sure I'll need custom software."

I glanced at his flow chart, scribbled a polynomial on a scrap of paper and handed it to him. "There. Plug that into Excel and you're good to go."

He was flabbergasted. "How did you do that?"

"My job isn't writing programs," I said. "My job is transforming hard problems into easy ones. I only write actual software to prove I'm right."

Coding as an academic activity is a very narrow intellectual pursuit. Coding as a real life activity draws on a lifetime of intellectual experiences, both academic and non-academic.

Children at the age of 5 should be preparing for those experiences. If you want to know what kids that age should be doing, you should look at what public television shows like Sesame Street and Arthur targeted at them depict them doing. They go outside and play. They explore. They make real physical things. They make friends (and enemies). They express themselves by participating in art and music. They learn to deal with winning and losing by playing games.

You know the one thing that kids on those programs almost never do? Watch TV. Real kids spend way too much time in front of screens.

Now I'm all for giving 9 year-olds a taste of programming. Seymour Papert did wonderful work along those lines, including with children as young as the fifth grade -- roughly 10 years old. There isn't much difference between a 10 and a 9 year old, but there's a huge difference between a 5 and 6 year-old.

Teaching a 5 year-old about coding is just virtue signalling. It's not something you do for the kid, it's something you do for your reputation.

Comment Re:The law has changed since 1934 (ie 1996) (Score 1) 339

I think the problem that chairman Wheeler was trying to solve was states that attempted to block all provision of broadband service under the universal service rules. I'm still trying to figure out why a state would ever deny an internet provider permission to be a lifeline provider. It can't be a profit-maker for those internet providers. It can't be that there aren't poor people who need service in the provider's area, or there would be no lifeline business. It can only be that the state did not wish for there to be broadband at all under the universal lifeline rules.

Slashdot Top Deals

You cannot have a science without measurement. -- R. W. Hamming

Working...