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Comment BASIC (Score 1) 496

BASIC, back in the day. I started teaching myself at 13, on a TI 99/4A. The school I was attending at the time had barely heard about computers, much less come up with a way to try to teach someone that young about them. I was actually starting to dabble in assembly language on that machine, and managed to get a sprite to move in response to me moving a joystick around. The school may have been woefully uninformed, but the public library was a pretty good resource.

A fortunate move to upstate New York put me on a track to pick up some classes on BASIC and Pascal at the high school and Watfiv and assembly language at a local university that had a high school summer program. My senior project in high school was a graphing program that generated several kinds of graphs using Apple Pascal and the turtle graphics package that came with it. The system could barely handle it, but it was pretty spiffy. I wrote my own keyboard input routines that would allow me to set up fields of a specific size that would only allow certain characters to be typed into them.

College was more Basic, which I was entirely fucking sick of by then, and some scripting languages. I got my intro to REXX there, which was much nicer than Basic. I switched schools into a more CS-oriented program and picked up C, Ada and COBOL. By then I was starting to hear about this newfangled C++, which really sucked back in the early '90's, let me tell you. They didn't even have a STL yet. They started talking about adding templates to the language a few years later.

By then I knew my way around C pretty well, but mostly had to work on the shitty proprietary languages of the 90's. I got into some work that involved actual C programming in the mid 90's, and had a pretty solid decade of C programming. Since 2005 it's been a pretty steady mix of Java and C++, along with a bit of maintenance on some really badly-designed projects in Perl, Ruby and TCL. I'm currently doing a mix of C++ for hardware-level access to some specialty hardware I'm working on, and Java to provide some web services associated with that hardware. I might get into some Javascript to put it all together, but I'm going to try to leave that to the guys who are more comfortable with Javascript than I am.

I don't see much new coming along the road. .net, go and rust are all sufficiently close to Java or C++ that they really don't interest me. Maybe if someone offers some large briefcases full of cash to work with them. I'd be more interested in doing some hand-optimized assembly language and perhaps some GPU programming, but that would probably take another decade to get good at.

Comment Re:The only assistant that's good (Score 1) 120

That would be Majel Barrett-Roddenberry, who voiced all of the computers in all of the various Star Trek shows and films, except the most recent ones. I met her at a fan run SF convention, Con*Cept, in Montreal, and she was a really nice person. I do think that we have enough of her speaking as the computer along with her other spoken roles to have a fairly complete vocabulary for a voice assistant. I am sure many others in addition to myself would like to have this on their phone, house assistant, car, GPS, etc.

As the saying goes:

MAKE IT SO!

Comment Re:Oops (Score 2, Insightful) 215

All the 'normal' sized people I know who drink soda drink diet soda.

But, the "normal" person today, is pretty much obese as compared to someone as recent as maybe 20 years ago or so....

But heaven forbid you say that to people....you cannot "fat shame" people, and everyone is to feel good about themselves.

Hence, overweight is now the accepted new normal.

While that might help peoples' self image, it won't ever help their physical health.

Comment Re:Its pretty important... (Score 2) 304

Seafood doesn't even factor into this. "More" ocean is supposed to translate into less seafood? Seriously?

Actually it will.

The brackish water of the marshes that is eroding...is a major part of the ecosystem of birth and lifecycle on a lot of fish that start there, breed there, but move more into the ocean. Oysters live on that edge between fresh and salt water....if you lose the marshes, you lose that wide area they can proliferate.

There's also the bird population that depends on this area.

So, no, it is not as simple as "more ocean". That entire ecosystem between the ocean and the fresh water is very important and if not replaced and allowed to disappear, will have great consequences for the seafood and other life that feed a good bit of the US.

Comment Re:Its pretty important... (Score 1) 304

That's your choice. Why should the rest of society subsidize your poor choices?

No, to suggest that they just pack up and move is common sense. The U.S. is a mighty big country. Just pick another location, and move. To continue living anywhere that continues to get battered by Mother Nature is just plain ignorant. Just because they think it's "home" is not a valid reason. Just because they were born there is not a valid reason. At some point in your life, you have to take responsibility for your actions. And that includes where you choose to live.

The point is...if this happens off the coast of LA to the point of the worst case scenario....this will not just affect those people who "choose to live there"...it will effect a great portion of the US economy, which will affect the whole country.

If you even discount the amount of domestic seafood that this part of LA produces for the whole of the US, you'll definitely feel it in the shortages of oil and gas that come from this area. Not only production from the Gulf coming in (those people that work those platforms live close to the coast for access to work)....but also the large processing plants in LA for oil from all over the world that feeds into the US.

Chances are, no matter where in the US you live, you likely get your gas from the processing plants in southern LA.

And for many parts here, New Orleans for instance, it is OLDER than the United States itself. The danger has evolved over the years, and a lot of this erosion is due to the pipes cutting across the bayous and the artificial water ways dug to transport all that oil from the Gulf to the processing plants and then to your tank.

SO, if you drive a car, or fuel your home heater...you do have a stake in the coastal erosion of southern LA.

NIMBY the rest of the US, doesn't want the oil refineries....we've given our coastline for the rest of the US, so why not shows some togetherness and thankfulness for that and help restore the coast.

If you're going to be that way....there is NO safe place in the US to live. Should we tell all the folks along the MS river to move, since it floods there? What about all those folks living where wildfires annually are rampant in CA? NYC is pretty much a huge terrorist target, why should we pay to protect it...etc?

Don't be so fucking selfish....

Comment Its pretty important... (Score 4, Informative) 304

This area of LA....a large percentage of the US's seafood comes from here, and, a large portion of the US's domestic oil comes from the Gulf into LA, and processed here.

Oil from all over the place is processed here.

The people that work these jobs, live on the coast and the sealife that supports these folks and provides a good amount of seafood to the US will disappear if this coastal erosion is allowed to continue.

This isn't just for the people of Louisiana, but for the great resources it provides the rest of the US.

Comment Re:Ick (Score 0) 131

Once again, common sense has flown right out the window....

Seriously, if you do NOT want to risk having nude or even more compromising images of yourself being posted online or in dead tree form....DON"T TAKE NAKED PICTURES OF YOURSELF!

And..don't let someone else take them of you either.

Simple really. I"m just amazed at how this simple truth evades so many people.

Comment Re:TED ideas = super obvious ideas (Score 2) 262

Why would they broadcast one entirely in Spanish?

If this is for US only....ENGLISH!!!

If you're wanting to become a citizen here, one of the prerequisites is to show a level of proficiency in English.

If these are TED talks for Mexico or other Spanish speaking nations, fine, but having an immersive situation in the US, where everything is published and spoken in English, would certainly help visiting and immigrating folks learn how to speak the country's language faster.

It sure worked in college....why not on a larger nation scale?

Wow..really? 2 for 2 troll?

When did it become unpopular to be proud of the US being an English speaking country?

This just used to be common sense...or, have we been "invaded" successfully at this point?

It's sad to see what used to be unwritten truths, values and common sense overridden.

But seriously....it is well known, in the US, if you are an English speaking person, you will be more successful in the country, and what's wrong with that? Learning the most common language would seem to be in everyones' best interest, no?

Comment Re:Wow! (Score 1) 262

Anyone concerned about illegal immigration and crime, as a combined subject, is at best misinformed or at worst racist or xenophobic, considering the statistics on the matter.

Well, Illegal Immigrant, by definition is someone here by criminal act.

They committed a crime coming here illegally...what part of that do you not understand?

That's not racist or xenophobic.

Most US citizens absolutely do NOT have a problem with people immigrating into this country....

We just want them to sign the fucking guest book on the way in, you know?

Comment Re:TED ideas = super obvious ideas (Score 0, Troll) 262

Why would they broadcast one entirely in Spanish?

If this is for US only....ENGLISH!!!

If you're wanting to become a citizen here, one of the prerequisites is to show a level of proficiency in English.

If these are TED talks for Mexico or other Spanish speaking nations, fine, but having an immersive situation in the US, where everything is published and spoken in English, would certainly help visiting and immigrating folks learn how to speak the country's language faster.

It sure worked in college....why not on a larger nation scale?

Wow....

Not many years ago, this would have been taken as "common sense", now it gets modded troll....?

Why?

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