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Comment Re:Or just go back to the way things were before (Score 1) 5

This is personal to me. A friend I knew in high school, went into the service with, and kept in touch with couldn't afford insurance and caught appendicitis. It ruined his credit and nearly his family. In 1992 when he had a heart attack, he just laid down and died rather than calling 911.

That's what happens in the US when you work full time and can't afford insurance.

Comment "As a cost-cutting measure..." (Score 4, Insightful) 32

This is the problem with subscription services; the provider can change their mind at a whim as to what they provide, leaving subscribers in the lurch. We saw it with the disappearing e-books a while back. Cell phone providers are changing plans all the time, as are TV providers. The situation will only get worse with Software-As-A-Service providers. What are you going to do when your budget software service goes under, or is acquired by a bigger provider and is shut down? Or when your backup provider stops supporting your OS?

... and this is on top of all the third party data sharing, affiliate advertising, and security bypass "features" that modern services employ.

I heartily recommend avoiding subscription services like the plague.
User Journal

Journal Journal: Sixteen: The Final Chapter 2

It's that time of year again. The time of year when everyone and their dog waxes nostalgic about all the shit nobody cares about from the year past, and stupidly predicts the next year in the grim knowledge that when the next New Year comes along nobody will remember
that the dumbass predicted a bunch of foolish shit that turned out to be complete and utter balderdash. I might as well, too. Just like I did last year (yes, a lot of this was pasted from last year's final chapter).

Comment Bzzt, failed analysis on "free speech" (Score 3, Informative) 157

Seriously.

First, it's explicit in the Constitution that "Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two thirds, expel a member." Whatever rules a House likes for its proceedings are the rules, and whatever punishment it designates for violating them is the punishment. The case law on that goes on to state that this means that the courts may not hear a case on such matters; no Federal court has the authority to even hear a case on the rules, much less get to the point that it can rule whether something is free speech or not.

Second, the Speech or Debate Clause only protects members form being held responsible "in any other Place"; their own House is perfectly allowed to hold them responsible for what they say. In accordance with the previous bit.

Third, this isn't a law, it's a proposed rule of the House, in the decidedly non-public forum of the floor of the House. The First Amendment doesn't remotely apply, at all, either literally or in any of its court-extended meanings. Even if the courts were allowed to rule on the rule (see the first problem), current precedent would fall on the side of the rulemakers.

Comment Uber is off mission (Score 1) 92

Uber started out as a simple middleman, matching up people with a car with people needing a ride. Now they're burning billions of dollars trying to shape the future of transportation. Instead of letting market forces shape the future transportation market and adapting to it, Uber has a grandiose vision they're trying to cram down the market's throat.

I don't think people really want the future Uber is trying to push. They should stop the self-driving car research, today. That future will happen anyway but it's not clear when cars will be able to transport passengers without a driver. Uber and Lyft are already treating human drivers like the machines they're working on to replace them. Neither will survive until robots are ready to take over unless they go back to basics. They'll need human drivers at least three years, probably closer to five. They can't survive that long burning through cash like they are today. The rider experience is already suffering from second rate drivers and high turnover.

Think about self checkouts at grocery stores when contemplating how long it will be before cars can drive themselves.

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