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Comment Re:67% is not that good (Score 1) 61

It's good for the NAO. When you're pushing the boundaries, anything over 50% is good.

For long-term climate models, things like the NAO average out across many years. For short-term weather forecasting, you have a week or more before the system diverges enough to cease to be useful. But it's tougher working on those in-between scales.

Comment Re:No it can't (Score 1) 61

Should be well worth it in terms of things like planning for agricultural products, natural gas supplies, etc.

The real issue however is that they've validated it with hindcasting. Which is certainly something, but isn't as ideal as you'd want. It's trivially easy to fit any arbitrary past dataset to a statistical model if you have enough parameters that can be tweaked, but that doesn't mean that you're actually capturing the underlying dynamics. That said, from the sound of it it's built around a physical model, so that increases the odds that it actually is, rather than just fitting to some arbitrary curve.

Comment Re:gloves? (Score 1) 324

Pretty much this. Aren't these the FIRST areas where I'd WANT a personalized gun? Rifles that cannot be looted by the enemy and be used against you? Undeniable proof who used the pistol to fire the shot in a shootout in a seedy neighborhood?

That is where anyone who puts his money where his mouth is would WANT such personalized and traceable guns.

Comment Heh, haven't heard that name in a while. (Score 1) 111

I used to follow some of what The Jester wrote. There are a number of people out there who think he's overrated, more brag than anything else. Still, I saw some pretty clever things out of him. For example, at one point he was going after some other hacking collective (I don't recall which one), and he announced a successful attack against them and posted a list of all of their names and real IP addresses. Only, the list wasn't real. Instead, anyone who tried to download the list had their connection logged and probed, an exploit used to trigger the computer to make a (real) TCP connection back to one of his computers, and a number of automated attacks launched against targets it considered particularly suspect (for example, if there was evidence of being logged into a known member twitter account). I.e., it wasn't actually a list of suspects, it was bait to build a list of suspects. I think he did the same trick with QR codes later.

Comment Re:Another obvious defense against this (Score 4, Interesting) 289

I want a "panic" finger such that it displays a "could not read fingerprint - try again" message and then immediate sets "allow_unlocking_with_fingerprint=False" internally so that a password is required. Make it indistinguishable from the usual unlock failure message so that it's impossible to tell that it was triggered (even by examining the on-device logs, if that's possible).

Submission + - "Splat" of Schiaparelli Mars lander likely found (spaceflightnow.com)

Tablizer writes: SpaceFlightNow.com: "Views from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter released Friday show the crash site where Europe’s experimental Schiaparelli lander fell to the red planet’s surface from a height of several miles, leaving a distinct dark patch on the Martian landscape...

The image from MRO’s context camera shows two new features attributed to the Schiaparelli spacecraft, including a large dark scar spanning an estimated 50 feet (15 meters) by 130 feet (40 meters). Schiaparelli’s ground team believes it is from the high-speed impact of the lander’s main body...

A little more than a half-mile (1 kilometer) to the south, a bright spot appears in the image, likely the 39-foot-diameter (12-meter) supersonic parachute and part of Schiaparelli’s heat shield, which released from the lander just before ESA lost contact."

Comment Hold down power button and ... (Score 5, Informative) 289

... keep holding it down.

Seriously, this is such an unconscionable violation of basic privacy that even people who have done nothing wrong should automatically have that reaction. And anybody who has done something wrong should know better than to use a fingerprint for unlocking anyway. What was this supposed to prove other than that they have a judge who will rubber-stamp any order no matter how appalling?

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