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Submission + - SPAM: Bitcoin for helping Teens

cellurl writes: In the future, your car will know the speed limit. It won't come from Navteq which is locked down. It will come from Wikispeedia.org which is going on its 8th year of narking on teens for speeding. And building other cool things like Speed Limit Aware Cruise Controls. Log the most speed limits with their free apps and win some Bitcoin thru Aug.

Submission + - Drone rules for Burning Man established. (suasnews.com)

garymortimer writes: Participants flying unmanned aerial vehicles (aka drones, RC airplanes, etc.) have developed a set of best practices for flying at Black Rock City this year.

The best practices came out of a July 17“Drone Summit” at Burning Man headquarters that had 40 in attendance and an estimated 100 on a teleconference. Burning Man organizers arranged the summit following participant complaints from BM2012 that included UAVs flying over crowds at the Man burn, one UAV flying at the Temple burn, and a concern that UAVs with cameras were invading peoples’ privacy.

Submission + - The Death of the American Drive-in

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Claire Suddath writes in Businessweek that the number of drive-ins in America has dwindled from over 4,000 in the 1960s to about 360 today and since Hollywood distributors are expected to stop producing movies in traditional 35 millimeter film by the end of this year and switch entirely to digital, America’s last remaining drive-ins—the majority of which are still family-owned and seasonally operated, could soon be gone. "We have challenges that other movie theaters don’t,” says John Vincent, president of United Drive-In Theater Owners Association and the owner of Wellfleet Drive-In in Cape Cod, Mass. “We have fewer screens and can only show one or two movies a night. Now we have to spend tens of thousands of dollars just to stay in business.” According to Vincent, only 150 drive-ins have converted to digital so far—the other 210 have until the end of the year either to get with the program or go out of business. It may seem silly to fret over the fate of 210 movie theaters whose business model is outdated, even compared with regular movie theaters but Honda Motor Co. is offering help with a program called “Project Drive-In.” The car company is planning to give away five digital projectors by the end of the year. Winners will be determined by voting from the public, which can be done online through Sept. 9 at ProjectDriveIn.com. “Cars and drive-in theaters go hand in hand,” says Alicia Jones, manager of Honda & Acura social marketing, "and it’s our mission to save this slice of Americana that holds such nostalgia for many of us."

Submission + - San Diego Drops Red-Light Cameras (utsandiego.com)

gannebraemorr writes: "From utsandiego.com: "San Diego on Friday became the latest in a cadre of California cities turning their backs on red-light cameras — aloof intersection sentries that have prompted $490 tickets to be mailed to 20,000 motorists per year here. Mayor Bob Filner announced his decision to take down the city’s 21 cameras at a news conference set at the most prolific intersection for the tickets, North Harbor Drive and West Grape Street, near San Diego International Airport. A crew went to work immediately taking down 'photo enforced' signs throughout the city. 'Seems to me that such a program can only be justified if there are demonstrable facts that prove that they raise the safety awareness and decrease accidents in our city,' Filner said of the cameras. 'The data, in fact, does not really prove it.'"

I have to say I'm a bit surprised that my city is voluntarily shedding potentially $9.8M in revenue after objectively evaluating a program. I wonder how much a system would cost that could switch my light from green to red if it detected a vehicle approaching from a red-lit direction at dangerous speeds."

Data Storage

Submission + - IronKey Releases Windows 8 Certified Bootable Flash Drive (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: IronKey has released a thumb drive certified to be used as a bootable Windows 8 device, enabling users to use Windows To Go — an enterprise feature of Windows 8 — to deliver a fully portable desktop. While Imation doesn't promote this feature, users can also boot up this USB on any Intel-based Apple computer. The flash drive has its drawbacks. It's not yet FIPS certified, it can't be provisioned as storage, and it lacks admin management features. The IronKey Workspace drive comes in 32GB, 64GB and 128GB capacities. It offers either 128-bit or 256-bit full disk encryption. Users must purchase the Windows 8 software separately. According to Imation's specifications, the IronKey Workspace has a maximum average read speed of 300MB/sec. and an average write speed of 100MB/sec. to 200MB/sec. When I timed the boot-up times, the initial boot-up from the USB drive was slow — 3 minutes and 40 seconds — but the drive was configuring itself. Subsequent boot-ups took a mere 35 seconds. Shutdown is near instantaneous — about 2 seconds. The flash drive is priced from $129 to $389 depending on capacity.
Cloud

Submission + - Rackspace Flips, Won't Support Third-party OpenStack Distros (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "Last year, Rackspace planned to support third-party OpenStack distributions as part of its private cloud offering. That was then. 'Things have evolved quickly as enterprises start evaluating their options in the cloud generally and the OpenStack market specifically,' said Jim Curry, general manager of Rackspace Private Cloud, in an email interview with ITworld's Nancy Gohring. Customers, it seems, want to run a cloud model internally that 'looks and feels like what Rackspace delivers in the public cloud. To deliver that experience, we needed to develop software that deploys an OpenStack cloud that Rackspace can operate and support.'"
China

Submission + - First Details of Chinese Spacecraft's Asteroid Encounter

the_newsbeagle writes: Chinese aerospace engineers have revealed, for the first time, details about their Chang’e-2 spacecraft’s encounter with the asteroid Toutatis last month. They have plenty to boast of: The asteroid flyby wasn’t part of the original flight plan, but engineers adapted the mission and navigated the satellite through deep space.

Exactly how close Chang'e-2 came to Toutatis is still unclear. The article states that the first reports “placed the flyby range at 3.2 km, which was astonishingly—even recklessly—tight. Passing within a few kilometers of an asteroid only 2 to 3 km in diameter at a speed of 10 730 meters per second could be described as either superb shooting or a near disaster.” If the Chinese spacecraft did pass that near, it could provide a “scientific bonanza” with data about the asteroid’s mass and composition.
Piracy

Submission + - RIANZ Blows $250,000 on NZ Three Strikes Law to Gain $616.57 (freezenet.ca)

Dangerous_Minds writes: Earlier, Slashdot posted a story where RIANZ convicted its first file-sharer under the New Zealand three strikes law. While the fine totaled $616.57, a New Zealand Herald report points out that in order to get that fine, RIANZ had to spend $250,000. Freezenet makes an interesting point that HADOPI (France's version of the three strikes law) faced similar problems when the Socialist party commented that 12 million euros was a lot of money to pay 60 agents to send out 1 million e-mails. In making this connection, the question raised is whether or not this money pit trend will continue when the Copyright Alert System (CAS) starts processing strike notices in the United States.

Submission + - Nokia receives $1.35B grant to develop graphene tech (tomshardware.com)

silverpig writes: It now appears that graphene has reached a point worthy of serious, direct industrial attention. The grant money itself comes from the European Union for the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET), but that the work will be done by a large non-governmental company with eyes on developing useful real-world applications is encouraging. Smartphones contain many components with high potential for actually making use of graphene — screens, batteries, ICs.

I'm no expert, but I hope that the funding model will ensure the developments remain in the public domain.

"Nokia is leading the electronic firms within the Graphene Flagship Consortium, which includes 73 other companies and academic institutions from a number of mediums. The Finnish handset manufacturer has received a grant of $1.35 billion to research and develop graphene for practical applications, with the European Union for the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) providing the grant itself."

Submission + - Car moders rejoice! (blogspot.com)

cellurl writes: "If you are an inventor, you know that the most expensive part of any computer or automotive MOD is obtaining the connectors. Molex, et al make connectors that can be quite pricey. For example, a simple connector found under the dashboard of your car can cost you $10. Many you can't even buy direct, only through a big OEM purchase.

In comes SLA (stereo lithography). Oops my bad, its new name is 3D printers. Don't be fooled. I bought a piece of SLA from Autocad artwork back in 1990 for $100. I had to go to a circuit board manufacturer in Mississippi who had the funky printer.

Anyway, I spoke with my buddy the other day about car-mods and it always comes back to "connector prices". No longer. My buddies at Hypertech in Bartlett now PRINT their connectors. Yep, 3M, Molex lawyers listen up, people are printing their own connectors. I asked how they get the metal piercing thing in the connector and they said they put it in afterwards.

Car moders rejoice, the new money is in 3d-cad-libraries, get em while they are hot!

-cellurl"

Submission + - Walmart installing 10,000 automated checkout systems this year (computerworld.com) 1

dcblogs writes: Walmart this week said it will offer a job to any honorably discharged veteran in his or her first 12 months off active duty. It also said it will buy an additional $50 billion in U.S. products over the next 10 years. Something else Walmart is doing is buying 10,000 automated checkout systems. The chain now has self-checkout systems installed in 1,800 stores; this new purchase will allow the chain to expand self-checkout to 2,500 of its approximately 4,000 stores. The company says the automated systems will not result in job cutbacks or reduced hours for employees. But others aren’t so sure. Automated self-checkout "does eliminate jobs, there's not much question about that. The question is how many?" said Frank Levy, an MIT professor emeritus of urban economics. Producing the automated systems will create jobs, but Levy said that the net overall effect may be job loss. "We should be thinking about it as a big problem," he said.
Japan

Submission + - Fukushima's fallout of fear (nature.com)

gbrumfiel writes: "Experts believe that the many thousands who fled from the Fukushima nuclear disaster received very low doses of radiation. But that doesn't mean there won't be health consequences. Nature magazine travelled to Fukushima prefecture and found evidence of an enormous mental strain from the accident. Levels of anxiety and PTSD-like symptoms are high among evacuees. Researchers fear that, in the long run, the mental problems could lead to depression and substance abuse among those who lost their homes. In other words, even if no one develops cancer as a direct result of radiation, the health effects could still be very real."
The Military

Submission + - DARPA Wants to Hide Naval Assets on the Sea Bottom (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has seen the future of naval warfare and it’s falling upward. As part of an effort to reduce the logistics of sending equipment into trouble areas, the agency’s Upward Falling Payloads project is aimed at developing storage capsules capable of remaining on the deep seabed for years. These would contain non-lethal military assets that could be deployed on the spot years in advance and rise to the surface as needed.
China

Submission + - NASA releases orbital photos of Beijing's air polution (washingtonpost.com)

skade88 writes: This story should remind all of us that air pollution controls are not just about addressing global warming. They also help us have cleaner air and fewer health problems resulting from smog and haze. Starting earlier this month, Beijing, China started having worse than normal air pollution issues. On Jan 14, 2013 the US Embassy's air pollution sensors in Beijing found the density of the most dangerous small air particles, PM 2.5, at 291 micrograms per cubic meter of air. The world Health Organization's guidelines for air pollution state that PM 2.5 above 25 micrograms per cubic meter of air is dangerous to a person's health.

To put the problem into perspective for anyone not living in Cloud City..... I mean Beijing, NASA has released two orbital photos of Beijing showing a before and during photo of the air pollution. The photo from Jan 4 shows parts of the Beijing still visible from space. The photo from Jan 14 shows nothing but a huge, thick cloud of haze with no buildings visible.

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