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Comment Re:More BS (Score 1, Interesting) 55

If a human driver, using the same map and their set of eyes, can't get the guy to his front door, what makes him think a car programmed by humans will be any better, especially by humans who have never seen the place you're going to?

When I was in college, and for the first couple of years of grad school, I drove a taxicab. Not a fruity Uber car, but an honest-to-god hack. For part of that time, I drove an actual Checker Marathon, which may have been the finest automobile ever built.

Decades later, I can still find my way around that city (Chicago), to any address and give you the best route. If you dropped me blindfolded anywhere within the Chicago city limits, I could find my way (as long as I was allowed to take the blindfold off after you dropped me). If there are Uber drivers who can't find their ass with both hands, it has nothing to do with maps. Maps? Pshaw. Learn your town and don't rely on the goddamn Google maps for everything. Learn how to navigate by the stars like we did back in my day (only partly kidding).

Comment Re:More BS (Score 1) 55

Sort of. That's only half of the problem. The other half is:

* Bad data
* Incomplete or missing data

In California and Washington I've seen incorrect map data both with Google Maps and Apple Maps. Sure a better driver _could_ (and should) be able to work around that but are they forced to in the first place??

The road data should both be:

[ ] complete
[ ] accurate

Obviously construction will cause some of that but it shouldn't take _years_ for a non-moving road to be added to the system.

--
GIMP v2.8 still sucks compared to Photoshop. Where are any of the Layer Effects???

Comment Re:But of course (Score 1) 197

Absolutely correct. What people forget is that the Mississippi used to have flood plains all along its path. When there was heavy rain anywhere along its course, the waters would raise and it would overflow its banks depositing rich soil and silt all along the way. Now, we've replaced the flood plains with housing developments and mini-malls.

That's not so much the case in the Baton Rouge area because of the protected Atchafalaya Basin and the big lock between it and the Mississippi. In other parts of the Midwest, though, you're absolutely right. Wetlands are for water, not for strip malls, oil pipelines or fracking sites.

Comment Re:Or the other reason.... (Score 1) 197

And yet the Netherlands has no problems with flooding despite most of the country being below sea level..

Of course, the Netherlands don't have a 3M km^2 watershed dumping water into them, either. And the Netherlands is smaller than Louisiana alone (by a factor of about 2.5), much less the Mississippi watershed (by a factor of about 80)....

Comment Re:Driving in reverse (Score 0, Troll) 98

But, does that mean that the removal of the physical headphone jack from the iPhone 7 is actually a form of social progress?

The removal of the headphone jack is basically the same as killing whales for oil.

It's bad for the environment, makes people mad but is a profit center for Apple and their "strategic partners".

Fuck Apple and fuck Tim Cook.

Comment Re:Or... (Score 1) 70

The USA is the country which was in the right place at the right time to dominate everything for the last couple hundred years.

Couple??? No, the USA has dominated for the last century, maybe. In the 19th century, we were mostly a non-entity outside North America (and arguably South America). We didn't really take over as the dominant world power till WW2. Before that, the UK was still the big dog....

Submission + - This crypto puzzle might unlock the other half of the NSA files (businessinsider.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Hacker 1x0123 says he has the other half of the NSA Equation Group files for sale, and he's offering a sample for those who can solve his crypto puzzle. So far, 1x0123 has refused to give up any samples to journalists who've asked, so this all could be a clever troll. But he has offered some hints on Twitter in recent days, with the .onion URL encrypted as: 02010403. On Tuesday, he offered up another hint and said at least two people had solved it.

Comment Re:No surprise - same erorrs in finance & ops (Score 1) 312

In the year 2016, a disturbing amount of human activity is run through Excel instead of proper databases.

A similar study from 2009 tested for errors in various operational spreadsheets and concluded, "Our results confirm the general belief among those who have studied spreadsheets that errors are commonplace." The Financial Times commented on the prevalence of spreadsheet errors in business, saying it's probably a function of training and organizational culture.

I've heard from a few salespeople in the software industry that their biggest competitor in the SMB space isn't $BigCRMCorp, but Excel spreadsheets that have acreted over the years.

This absolutely doesn't surprise me. The concept of thinking about where one's data lives is nearly extinct outside of technical circles, and even Access is seen as "too complicated" by a lot of people. The utility of third normal form is obvious to us, but lots of people are perfectly served with pivot tables. How many people receive formal training in any form of database anymore? Even lots of web designers who use MySQL on the back end of their CMS software don't do a whole lot in PHPMyAdmin unless they have to.

Excel is very simple, ubiquitous, and has a low ceiling of functionality. It's the lowest common denominator, and unfortunately, it's "good enough" for lots of people.

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