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Comment Re:Will their implementation allow tracking? (Score 1) 35

When banks implement blockchains, will their version allow tracking of all the individuals involved in the whole chain?

Of course it will. They want to use a blockchain for maintaining an efficient high-speed ledger of all bank-to-bank transactions. When you do a funds transfer from, for your account to an account at another bank, they'll write an entry to the block chain and both parties will be able to validate the time at which the transaction occurred. Having an unforgeable ledger is the entire point of the system that they're proposing.

Comment Re:Best selling computer? (Score 1) 90

I'm surprised that it was that few. I remember seeing them for £50 in Argos about a decade after they were first released. They were incredibly popular as games machines and a load of shops had a row of C64 game tapes for around 50p each (NES games were around £10, if I remember correctly, at the same time).

Comment Re:A Lot of Effort to Bury the Lede (Score 1) 52

There's no vast left- or right-wing media conspiracy. There's a small number of owners of the mainstream press, and they will not print anything that directly contradicts the interests of these owners. This has no allegiance to any political party or ideology other than a desire for certain individuals to increase their personal power.

Various governments have allowed mergers and acquisitions among news companies until there's very little independent press. Most countries don't want to regulate press freedom too heavily (for good reason - there's a very fine line between regulating truth in journalism and forcing propaganda and it's incredibly easy for the former to slip into the latter), so we're left with the majority of the population being informed by untrustworthy sources.

Comment Re:Pretty shocking (Score 1) 59

I find the map pretty surprising. Zoom in on the UK, and most of England is yellow (11-15 g/m3), but Reading (dense traffic, industrial areas, lots of diesel trains passing through) is green (<10), yet completely surrounded by yellow areas. I'd probably be inclined to trust the point samples, but their averaging between them looks like it's nonsense. The middle of Wales is pretty green, but with squares of yellow. The green makes sense (it's basically a big space full of hills and sheep), but the yellow doesn't seem to correspond with any human habitation or industry.

Comment Re: don't get your hope up (Score 1) 192

Indeed. Under the Consumer Rights Act and the earlier Sale of Goods Act, you are entitled to a refund for a variety of reasons. Any claims made by the seller that influenced your decision and are false gives you grounds for a refund (or a replacement with a version that meets these requirements). I had the battery on an Apple laptop fail after the warranty expired, but because of the SoGA they replaced it without quibble: their website claimed that it would retain 80% of its charge after 300 discharge cycles and the system monitor showed that it was retaining about 15% of its charge after about 120 complete cycles.

Comment Re:But then who audits the auditors? (Score 1) 165

The auditors usually won't need access to open-ended person search tools, they mostly just check existing cases.

And the top-level auditors (auditors of auditors) should probably be rotated and/or lent cross-agency so that a bad apple doesn't have time to spoil an entire agency.

Nothing is 100% foolproof; it's a matter of reducing average risk.

Comment Re:don't get your hope up (Score 1) 192

I don't recall a single instance where they've actually required compensation, let alone refunds, be paid to someone who fell for the misleading advertising before it got pulled.

Can't you already just return stuff in the UK if it doesn't do what it says on the tin? This seems like low-hanging fruit.

Comment Re:don't get your hope up (Score -1, Flamebait) 192

Really? You're not going to bother explaining that?

Really.

Well, in any case, for people who don't want to go hunting for earlier, unmentioned discussions,

Are you going to hold their dick for them when they have to piss, too? Is this hand-holding, dick-jerking Slashdot the one you want yo participate in? Let 'em learn to internet like the rest of us. At most, give 'em a LMGTFY link (if not fuckinggoogleit, pls)

Comment Re:Who are these people? (Score 1) 364

Intelligence being good for you is not the same as stupidity being bad for you.

Of course it is. Intelligence is a scale, at one end we call it stupidity and at the other we call it intelligence. Less of one is more of the other.

But correlation is required for causation. Are you suggesting intelligence is irrelevant to income-earning potential for most people?

I'm outright saying that income-earning potential is relevant to eventual performance on an IQ test. And it's not news, this is a well-known critique of IQ testing. People who use it to try to prove things usually fail.

Intelligence is a benefit as long as it doesn't impede your ability to breed. And it doesn't. It's good in all kinds of situations, even smashing things with a rock. Getting just the right smash on is aided by intelligence.

Comment Reverse Competition [Re:Clearly Samsung's QA dep (Score 1) 128

When I complained to the store (Sears) they said that all washing machines are made that way now [90's]

That's a really dumb justification for suckage. "Sure, we suck, but so do our competitors now." I see now it's not just limited to telecoms and presidential candidates.

I suppose the appliance makers could argue that power-saving regulations limit their ability to make the "big iron" washers you talk about. Some of the older stuff from say the 50's were tough, stable, lasting, and easy to repair, but were also power-hogs.

By the way, our semi-old washer only has that problem if you wash big items like winter blankets or jackets. One has to be home to monitor it during such, else it dances around the garage. Being in a warmer region, it's usually not a problem.

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