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Comment Re:They seem to think they have a say in this (Score 2) 346

What they haven't learned is the Universe doesn't care about the FBI, or even criminals for that matter. If mathematics makes hard-to-break encryption possible, then that is simply that. Unless Congress plans to pass laws banning encryption, or demanding back doors, which will set it up for a big fight in the Supreme Court, the government should just shut its fucking pie hole and get about investigating crimes. Criminals have been hiding and destroying evidence as long as there have been criminals, and I've seen absolutely nothing that suggests that more criminals are getting away with crimes now than they did a couple of decades ago.

Comment Re:For the Yanks who are confused. (Score 1) 531

It's not like a treaty, it IS a treaty. The ECC has been around in one form or another for nearly sixty years, and the whole point of the common market is to allow the free flow of goods and services between member states. That requires rules to deal with member states who try to gain unfair advantage by, say, granting large multinationals absurdly low tax rates, and, once they've set up shop, can now gain access to the entire Common Market.

I'm not clear what critics are objecting to here. Are they saying nations should be able to just ignore treaty provisions which they willingly and freely signed up for whenever they want? Are critics saying that other signatories to said treaties have no right to demand redress?

Comment Re:countries are no more? (Score 1) 531

If they want to be part of the European Common Market, they have to abide by the rules all the members, including Ireland, agreed to. If Ireland wishes to go its own way, it can invoke Article 50 like Britain has. Of course, that would likely mean companies like Apple and Microsoft would move their European headquarters, because the real reason that Ireland and these companies struck up these rather favorable tax deals was because they could gain access to the Common Market while gaining a very advantageous tax rate from being taxed in Ireland, rather than, say, Britain or Germany.

Comment Re:SubjectIsSubject (Score 2) 531

If Ireland doesn't like EU rules it can always depart the EU. If course then it will lose its privileged access to the Common Market, and let's be clear here, the tax deal with Apple was littl more than the creation of a tax haven for Apple to gain cheap access to the Common Market.

Comment Re:Good (Score 2) 531

If Irish tax law contravenes it's treaties with the rest of the EU, that very treaty requires Ireland to abide by the EU's decision. Ireland willingly and knowingly violated it's treaty obligations in its deals with Application and Google, so there is nothing arbitrary or capricious about this ruling.

Comment Re:'Refutes' or 'denies'? (Score 2) 531

They are going to attempt to refute the ruling. Whether they refute it or not in fact depends greatly upon whether their appeal is successful.

At any rate, Ireland's reputation for basically being a tax haven that allows cheap access to EU markets has long been established. The EU is finally getting around to fixing what amounts to a significant problem. If Ireland wants to be part of the Common Market, it needs to play by the Common Market's rules.

Comment Re:I hate Apple, but no (Score 4, Insightful) 531

Forcing companies to pay taxes on earnings they made in a country, rather than allowing them to move that money to a lower-tax jurisdiction is hardly breaking that company's back. It's about time international bodies started going after these race-to-the-bottom tax avoidance schemes.

Comment Re:Misleading (Score 1) 152

The driver will not be able to reactivate the Autopilot until the car is stopped and put in 'Park.'

That's a really bad idea. If they really want to punish them, they should use a timer instead.

A few years ago, a friend drove a Prius and the GPS navigation input function didn't work unless she went less than 5 miles an hour, so what my friend ended up doing was slowing down at the most inappropriate places on freeways and highways just so she could use the built-in navigation.

No doubt, frustrated Tesla drivers will just start parking their car in the middle of the roads just so they can re-engage their auto-pilot. That's what happens when one tries to use technology to control human beings. Those human beings start rebelling and start acting like even bigger idiots, possibly causing even more accidents. Also, I suspect that many Tesla owners will just try to disable/postpone this last update for as long as they can.

Comment Re:We have K&R on PDF (Score 1) 224

Even if you did, it strikes me that this is an absurd metric. Since a lot of C development goes on within communities; either closed source shops, or open source projects, where it's likely only a portion of the mailing list archives, if any of them at all, are archived. The majority of the BSD and Linux kernels are written in C, along with a significant percentage of the toolsets, so clearly there's one helluva lot of C coding going on. Whether search engines index that activity or not is irrelevant.

A better metric, though not perfect, would be to look at the activity in places like Git, to see how many lines of code roughly are in any given language.

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