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Submission + - Intel unofficially cuts prices for its x86 CPUs across the board 1

Artem Tashkinov writes: In an expected turn of events, now that AMD Ryzen is less than a week away from going public, Intel has unofficially cut prices for a long range of its CPUs. The biggest price cuts involve the following CPUs:
  • Intel Core i7-6850K, Broadwell, 3.6GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $700, now $550 (21% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6800K, Broadwell, 3.4GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $500, now $360 (28% off)
  • Intel Core i7-5820K, Haswell, 3.3GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $420, now $320 (24% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6700K, SkyLake, 4.0GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $400, now $260 (35% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6600K, SkyLake, 3.5GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $270, now $180 (33% off)

It's so good to finally have a competition in the x86 CPU market back after more than ten years since Intel released its Core 2 CPUs.

Comment Re: pointless (Score 1) 132

Just because you have a "smart" TV doesn't mean you're stuck using the "smart" bits. Plug in an HDMI cable or three to the video source of your choosing, and you never have to touch the smart OS stuff unless you want to.

Just because it has a network connection doesn't mean you have to connect it to a network.

Government

FCC To Halt Rule That Protects Your Private Data From Security Breaches (arstechnica.com) 96

According to Ars Technica, "The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information." From the report: The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information -- such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data -- from theft and data breaches. The rule would be blocked even if a majority of commissioners supported keeping them in place, because the FCC's Wireline Competition Bureau can make the decision on its own. That "full commission vote on the pending petitions" could wipe out the entire privacy rulemaking, not just the data security section, in response to petitions filed by trade groups representing ISPs. That vote has not yet been scheduled. The most well-known portion of the privacy order requires ISPs to get opt-in consent from consumers before sharing Web browsing data and other private information with advertisers and other third parties. The opt-in rule is supposed to take effect December 4, 2017, unless the FCC or Congress eliminates it before then. Pai has said that ISPs shouldn't face stricter rules than online providers like Google and Facebook, which are regulated separately by the Federal Trade Commission. Pai wants a "technology-neutral privacy framework for the online world" based on the FTC's standards. According to today's FCC statement, the data security rule "is not consistent with the FTC's privacy standards."

Comment Re: Well yeah (Score 1) 327

Don't count on that.

Let's say robots end up planting, tending, and harvesting all our crops. Crop prices will not drop to some amazingly cheap level, because there will still be the inherent costs of seeds, fertilizer and irrigation, as well as the costs of transporting the crops to market.

Then add in the power and maintenance costs of the robots.

Then add in any overhead I missed.

Then add in the profit margin for the corporation who owns the farm and robots.

Comment Re:Fake News (Score 1) 262

Not all of the fake reporters have those aims. Some of them simply want ad views, lots and lots of ad views. Making up news is a good way to get them. If you post a story titled "Trump's issues order permitting execution of illegal immigrants" or "Obama's secret terror cells in the white house' or 'Kim Kardashian to perform televised surgery" you are going to get a lot of views.

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