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Comment Re:Well... (Score 1) 75

No, what he is referring to is that you get into a command shell, you can invoke an unsigned PowerShell script with PowerShell.exe -file. But that's not much different than source in bash.

But it's hard to imagine a social engineering attack that would get a user to download a file and then get them into a CLI session to override execute flags or signing to invoke the script file.

Comment Re:Not that big a leap (but I doubt OOP @ times) (Score 1) 75

This is one of the reasons micro kernels have a much more manageable security model. The problem being microkernels have some performance penalties that, at least in previous generations of CPUs, lead most OS developers to work in monolithic or mixed models. Yes, there are user space device drivers, so there has been a lot of work done to move device drivers a lot further away from Ring 0 and Ring 1, but even this simply makes monolithic kernels even more complex, and complexity is always the enemy of security.

Comment Re:(bash|sh|ksh|zsh) && !PowerShell (Score 1) 75

The kinds of vulnerabilities that PowerShell suffers would be suffered by any operating system that has a fairly comprehensive scripting language. The issue simply is if you can automate OS functions like creating, altering or deleting files and other system resources, someone can write a malicious script that, if run even in an non-super user context, can wreak havoc, but if run in a super user or similar higher access context can lead to enormous damage or to compromised systems. There are ways to mitigate this for both Windows and *nix, but more often than not you have to be proactive about it.

Comment I wouldn't use this if it existed (Score 1) 253

There is no way that watching a movie on my Samsung 32" LCD TV (with in-built stereo speakers) or my even smaller Samsung PC monitor (and fairly generic Creative Labs 2.1 speakers) can come close to watching that movie on the big screen with full surround sound.

And the experience at the movies is great. The cinema I go to only charged me $4.50 (I get concession prices) for my last ticket (although because Disney are so evil they make Darth Vader look like a saint, I will have to pay $6.50 for Star Wars and any other big Disney films going forward). The munchies aren't overpriced either. And I have never experienced any of the negatives of people talking through the movie or using their phones in a way that's annoying or anything else that ruins the experience.

Comment Re:More likely medical practice, not evolution (Score 1) 242

What I considered really interesting was the question: if cesarean became the normal method of delivery for an extended period of time (many generations) could humans end up at a point where natural birth was not possible?

I think it's likely that before too many more generations the normal process will be to grow babies in artificial wombs, and that could eventually make it so that a significant percentage of women become unable to bear children the old-fashioned way. Although we'd lose the evolutionary pressure for wide hips for birthing, it doesn't seem like there are any evolutionary pressures against wide hips, so I don't see why they'd disappear.

Comment Movie Makers do NOT get money from candy. (Score 1) 253

...that by offering you new titles so early they are going to lose on all the overpriced cold drinks, and snacks they sell you at the theatre.

This is incorrect. Movie theaters make ZERO money on ticket sales for the first few weeks, then a small portion of the ticket sale, and then eventually a good portion. Pretty much ALL ticket money goes to the makers of the movie.

THE REASON why you have those overpriced drinks and such, is because it's the only source of income for the movie theater itself.

Comment Re:People use this? (Score 1) 59

Anyone who defends this convenience-over-privacy should download and print Jihadi-type information, nuke plans, bio-weapons info, etc. through this service and see how long it is before there is a knock on their door.

Sure. Got a link? I have absolutely zero concern about any sort of problem like that.

Comment Re:People use this? (Score 1) 59

I can't believe people willingly send their documents to Google where they will be processed by their systems and stored for however long.

I love it. It's super convenient to be able to print to my printer from any device, anywhere. Even when I'm printing from a computer rather than my phone or tablet, I frequently find that the native print drivers are unreliable and buggy over the network, and especially over Wifi. Not so much that I can't get it to connect and print with a little fiddling but Google Cloud Print just works, every time. As for Google "processing" the documents, (a) I'm fairly certain they don't data mine Cloud Print data and (b) I don't care. Most of what I print I either created in Google Docs or received in Gmail anyway. And even where that's not the case, the only thing Google would do with anything learned from my print jobs is to make better choices about what ads I might find interesting.

However... my printer is an Epson, and it was bootlooping a couple of days ago (I turned it off). I assumed the printer itself was having some problem and was planning to investigate when I have time this weekend. Sounds like I just need to wait for Google to sort this problem out and I'll be good.

Note that I work for Google, though not on Cloud Print. I'm just a (usually) happy user of Cloud Print.

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