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Submission + - Mozilla Thunderbird Finally Makes Its Way Back into Debian's Repos

prisoninmate writes: A year ago, we told you that, after ten long years, the Debian Project finally found a way to switch their rebranded Iceweasel web browser back to Mozilla Firefox, both the ESR (Extended Support Release) and normal versions, but one question remained: what about the Mozilla Thunderbird email, news, and calendar client? Well, that question has an official answer today, as the Mozilla Thunderbird packages appear to have landed in the Debian repositories as a replacement for Icedove, the rebranded version that Debian Project was forced to use for more than ten years do to trademark issues. Make sure you read the entire article to find out what steps you need to take if you want to migrate from Icedove to Mozilla Thunderbird.

Submission + - Faulty phone battery may have caused fire that brought down EgyptAir flight MS80 (ibtimes.co.uk)

drunkdrone writes: French authorities investigating the EgyptAir crash that killed 66 people last year believe that the plane may have been brought down by an overheating phone battery.

Investigators say the fire that broke out on the Airbus A320 in May 2016 started in the spot where the co-pilot had stowed his iPad and iPhone 6S, which he placed on top of the instrument panel in the plane's cockpit.

Submission + - Scientists scramble to protect research on climate change (cnn.com)

ClickOnThis writes: Scientists are concerned that an incoming Trump administration would remove existing datasets on climate-change. They are scrambling to ensure that existing data is preserved. From the article:

Some scientists and academics are embarking on a frenzied mission to archive reams of scientific data on climate change, energized by a concern that a Trump administration could seek to wipe government websites of hard-earned research.

Environmentalists and researchers encountered a friendly White House over the last eight years that encouraged inquiry into global warming and signed historic agreements meant to lower global carbon emissions. But the surprise victory of Donald Trump last month has ignited a scramble among those minds who are alarmed by the President-elect's comments on climate change and a string of appointments who do not share the Obama administration's views or attention to this type of scientific research.

The chief concern: publicly available climate change data and research found on government websites would be wiped clean or made otherwise inaccessible to the public. Some worry the information could only be retrieved with a taxing Freedom of Information Act request.


Submission + - Is LED, light-emitting diode, making DST, daylight saving time, obsolete?

Max_W writes: More and more countries stop using the DST, daylight saving time. These are India, China, Russia, Brazil, etc. The LED technology significantly reduces energy consumption on lighting. Do we really need this trouble of changing time on our clocks twice a year? Besides, the DST makes the software excessively complicated and prone to "fluid time" bugs.

Submission + - Delta Airlines seeking a "Operations Manager IT - Crisis Management" (greatjob.net)

McGruber writes: Delta Air Lines, grounded around the world after an unexplained computer glitch (https://it.slashdot.org/story/16/08/08/1251252/delta-air-lines-grounded-around-the-world-after-computer-outage), has an opening for an "Operations Manager IT — Crisis Management" (https://delta.greatjob.net/jobs/JobDescRequestAction.action?PSUID=66c3ea1e-88b3-4ad4-b1e6-7b79cec74147) The job responsibilities include "Help to resolve identify, troubleshoot and resolve Crisis Situations within the IT organization; Ensure the availability, performance and operational integrity of the Information Systems and Networks serving the Delta enterprise; and Communicate the business impact and ensure the right resources are available and engaged to quickly resolve any technology issue."

Submission + - SPAM: MH370 Pilot Flew a Suicide Route on His Home Simulator Closely Matching Final Fl 1

schwit1 writes: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was likely steered into the sea intentionally, by its own captain, in a pre-planned mass murder-suicide, a new report reveals.

In an exclusive story posted online Friday, New York magazine says that the plane’s captain, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, “conducted a simulated flight deep into the remote southern Indian ocean less than a month before the plane vanished under uncannily similar circumstances.”

Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: Use Hypnotism to Make Your Kids Behave?

kheldan writes: Apparently someone thinks hypnotizing kids to make them do their homework, chores, and otherwise 'behave' is a good idea. Lisa Machenberg, a professional hypnotist, has been using this on over 1000 kids in the last 23 years. “I hypnotize my children and my husband to do things for my benefit all the time,” she says.

But hypnosis can have serious side effects, including tiredness, crisis of identity, insomnia, irritability, fears, panic attacks, deficit of attention, distorted sense of self, confusion, sexually abberant behaviors, unexpected trance-like state, delusional thinking, depression, dizziness, syncope, fearfulness, feelings of guilt, histrionic reactions, impaired memory, nausea, obsessions, changes in personality.

Panacea, or child abuse? You be the judge.

Submission + - Do You Have a Living Doppelganger?

HughPickens.com writes: Folk wisdom has it that everyone has a doppelganger; somewhere out there there’s a perfect duplicate of you, with your mother’s eyes, your father’s nose and that annoying mole you’ve always meant to have removed. Now BBC reports that last year Teghan Lucas set out to test the hypothesis that everyone has a living double. Armed with a public collection of photographs of U.S. military personnel and the help of colleagues from the University of Adelaide, Lucas painstakingly analysed the faces of nearly four thousand individuals, measuring the distances between key features such as the eyes and ears. Next she calculated the probability that two peoples’ faces would match. What she found was good news for the criminal justice system, but likely to disappoint anyone pining for their long-lost double: the chances of sharing just eight dimensions with someone else are less than one in a trillion. Even with 7.4 billion people on the planet, that’s only a one in 135 chance that there’s a single pair of doppelgangers. Lucas says this study has provided much-needed evidence that facial anthropometric measurements are as accurate as fingerprints and DNA when it comes to identifying a criminal. “The use of video surveillance systems for security purposes is increasing and as a result, there are more and more instances of criminals leaving their ‘faces’ at a scene of a crime,” says Ms Lucas. “At the same time, criminals are getting smarter and are avoiding leaving DNA or fingerprint traces at a crime scene.”

But that's not the whole story. The study relied on exact measurements; if your doppelganger’s ears are 59 mm but yours are 60, your likeness wouldn’t count. “It depends whether we mean ‘lookalike to a human’ or ‘lookalike to facial recognition software’,” says David Aldous. If fine details aren’t important, suddenly the possibility of having a lookalike looks a lot more realistic. It depends on the way faces are stored in the brain: more like a map than an image. To ensure that friends and acquaintances can be recognized in any context, the brain employs an area known as the fusiform gyrus to tie all the pieces together. This holistic ‘sum of the parts’ perception is thought to make recognizing friends a lot more accurate than it would be if their features were assessed in isolation. Using this type of analysis, and judging by the number of celebrity look-alikes out there, unless you have particularly rare features, you may have literally thousands of doppelgangers. “I think most people have somebody who is a facial lookalike unless they have a truly exceptional and unusual face,” says Francois Brunelle has photographed more than 200 pairs of doppelgangers for his I'm Not a Look-Alike project. “I think in the digital age which we are entering, at some point we will know because there will be pictures of almost everyone online

Submission + - Google staff protest casual sexism by adding "Lady" to their job titles

AmiMoJo writes: More than 800 members of Google's staff are standing together in a showing against sexism today by appending a single word to their job titles: "Lady." This is happening in response to a ludicrous comment made during Alphabet's shareholder meeting last week, when someone referred to company CFO Ruth Porat as the organization's "lady CFO." The idea sprouted in an email group for alums of a Google leadership-development program for women. One employee suggested that they should all change their titles to "Lady ___" in acknowledgement and lighthearted protest of the incident. As in "Lady Systems Engineer," or "Lady People Analytics Manager." As of now, more than 800 Googlers — women and men — have changed their job titles in the company-wide directory or in their email signatures.

Submission + - Prince's death would have broken Wikipedia, but Michael Jackson did it first (wikimedia.org)

The ed17 writes: At one point, over 800 people per second were visiting Prince's Wikipedia article. When coupled with a large number of attempted edits, Wikipedia's "PoolCounter" kicked in. Put into place after the death of Michael Jackson, it protects Wikimedia's servers from traffic spikes. An engineer said “Without PoolCounter, all of [the] servers would have been tied up with the work of displaying and processing the Prince article ... It would have been impossible to view or edit the majority of all other content on Wikimedia.”

Submission + - Carl Sagan received anonymous note predicting Columbia disaster,20 years early (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: You never know what you'll find in the FBI's old files. Case in point: A weird and weirdly prophetic letter in Carl Sagan's files that predicted the Columbia disaster — 20 years before it launched. Of course, the letter got a lot of details wrong: The explosion wasn't followed by World War III, let alone "ARMAGEDDON." At least not yet. But it gets weirder, because the person who supposedly sent the letter, at least as far as the FBI could tell, died 10 years before that. Read the full story, and read the letter, on MuckRock.

Submission + - ISIS use of TrueCrypt, and origins of TrueCrypt software

craighansen writes: While previous articles have suggested that burner phones and not encryption were the primary mechanism for ISIS-linked operations in Europe, a New York Times article describes tell-tale signs of the use of TrueCrypt software by ISIS operatives. A further New Yorker article discusses the origins of TrueCrypt software in E4M software authored by Paul Le Roux, who was arrested by the DEA in 2012 and became a cooperator with the federal government for years, resulting in dropping support in 2014 for the software until a security audit completed in 2015 considered the possibilities of back doors or other security faults. Nevertheless, documents released by Edward Snowden in 2013 indicated that the NSA was having difficulty cracking TrueCrypt absent external breaks.

Submission + - Clean out Distros

wnfJv8eC writes: There needs to a user site to survey distro packages. I just went to remove xfsprogs, some hang over from SGI from the early, very early 2000s. Why is Gnome dependent on this package? Remove it, remove Gnome? Really? The dependency tree is all screwed up. Never mind XFS, which by now I can't imagine anyone using, why aren't such addons a plugin? Why are they still supported. Who uses them. Once Linux dropped support for minix. Now one used it.
It's time for a house cleaning. That starts with a good vote on what is and isn't being used. Then dependency trees can be corrected, not just grandfathered in.
There are many examples of stupid dependencies. For example Rhythmbox requires gvfs-afc, which rpm -qi describes as "This package provides support for reading files on mobile devices including phones and music players to applications using gvfs."
So if I never plug my phone or other mobile device into my computer to play music I must have this thing loaded and running? But remove gvfs-afc, and pull Rhythmbox. The dependency is all wrong.

Submission + - Pale Moon Devs Ponder Dropping Current Codebase and Starting from Scratch (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The developers of the Palo Moon browser are thinking of scratching their current codebase due to the fact that i doesn't support many of today's current Web standards and because future Firefox plans will introduce incompatibilities within its codebase.

The team plans to build a new browser from scratch, which they'll use to replace Pale Moon when it reaches a stable version. As with the old Pale Moon, the browser will keep Firefox's pre-Australis interface and still support many features removed in Firefox, like Tab Groups and full themes.

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