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Comment Re:Technical OR legislative? (Score 1) 241

Then small companies can no longer make any IoT product.

Not necessarily. It depends on what your standards and rules are.

Sure, you could write the rules in such a way that only big companies can afford to comply with them. It doesn't mean you have to. What's more rules could actually ensure small companies could remain competitive by creating safe harbors if you do certain things. Believe me there are lawsuits coming in the future, whether there is legislative or regulatory action or no. It would go a long way toward keeping the little guy competitive if he could point to rules that he was supposed to follow and did. This would socialize the cost novel attack vectors evenly rather than distribute the costs stochastically.

Eliminating the low-hanging fruit could make IoT devices reasonably safe, and "reasonable" is a much more attainable goal than "absolutely". Everyone fails at "absolutely", but only big companies can afford to bear the cost of that failure.

As for stuff getting designed in China, it's the low prices, period. I actually evaluated some Chinese radio linked flow meters a few years ago -- they were intended for metering liquor being poured in casinos (where the "free drinks" paid for by the casinos are acdtually paid for by a subcontractor and poured by a bartender who lives on tips). We wanted to adapt them for pesticide flow metering. The guy we were working with was selling these gizmos at $200, but they arrived on his US loading dock from China all boxed and ready to ship out to customers at a wholesale price of about $3. I was astonished. That's why stuff like that doesn't get made in the first world anymore, it's the jaw-droppingly low wholesale prices. Quality wasn't great, but with a $197 margin you can afford to ship replacements out for free.
Adding regulatory compliance costs to a device like that actually favors domestic producers.

Comment Re:We Were Attacked! (Score 1) 74

"LOL! You think so? Let's say your own DNS infrastructure is a victim of this attack with the same magnitude. Are you able to handle this?"

Yep, all fucking day without even looking, and IPv6 will make it even easier. It's called a static IP address and not having more fucking domain names than you can handle.

While everyone else was fucked, my sites ran without a problem, and they all use DynDNS.

Comment Cui Bono? (Score 1, Insightful) 148

There's lots of senseless finger-pointing going around. Anonymous doesn't get anything by shutting down Netflix (Americans aren't going to pressure the State Dept. over it to restore Julian's internet). So, who benefits by shutting down Twitter while Wikileaks is rolling out anti-Clinton hits and the Twitterverse is trying to work out what the leaks mean? North Korea? Only if they're doing it for the lulz. Or promises of favorable treatment under a Clinton administration.

Comment Re:in other news (Score 2, Insightful) 81

And I don't have to buy them from Tesla â" there are plenty of other sellers out there.

Yeah, but if you have a Tesla roof, Powerwall, and Model 3, then it'll handle the credits for you among the reverse net metering, the panel, and your charge-ups at the SuperChargers.

If you put ten Teslets in at home yesterday, you can take ten Teslets out at the SuperCharger today.

Solar City, on its own, had to make up all of the finance costs from net-metering only. As part of Tesla, they can give you flexibility on how to handle the charges. If you consume way more than your production in your cars, and go past the finance costs for your roof, then they can charge that difference to your credit card. But before that, it's much more economically efficient to keep all the charges in-system.

If you have a non-integrated stack then you can do all the same things, but it's necessarily going to cost more because of transaction costs.

Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 322

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 274

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Re:I'm glad somebody is on the case (Score 1) 191

" Apple chargers are incredibly over-engineered to protect against many problems."

Except for people running them off square-wave inverters, and then your touchscreen goes to utter shit because of the real Apple charger (as in the one that came with my fiance's 4S) passing along some seriously wonky power and signal. Give it a shot, hook up to an O-scope and watch for yourself. You might even be able to hear a slightly audible buzzing from the iDevice itself.

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